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The French and Champagne

Actually I'd go for the French fizzy cider over champagne every time, tastes great & it's pretty cheap.
Burn the heretic!
Cider is neither French or fizzy.
You are talking about cidre, which in English means fizzy pish.
 
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Firstly, this is far nicer than champagne and often on offer for £8 a bottle if you get the right supermarket at the right time...



Secondly - and more importantly - the French didn't invent champagne. We did...

Nice stuff that. And the Co op version of cava @ £6.99 a pop is quite quaffable too.
 
The think that gets me about all this is that the French just happen to live somewhere where you can grow decent grapes.
It's not like jumping up and down on the bloody things is really that much of an accomplishment. Give me a bottle of Rioja any day.
 

NSP

LE
Nice stuff that. And the Co op version of cava @ £6.99 a pop is quite quaffable too.
Co-op one is rank to my palate. Tesco own brand isn't too shabby if chilled sufficiently, though.
 
" I was on Stella and Malt Whiskies. "
Wife beater on your wedding day!
Stay classy, Joker.
:cool:
At our RNA functions, we used to have an alchohol fuelled reception - Cava (fruit based drink for the ladies!) or rum. Being partial to both, I had glasses of rum and cava. Top tip - if giving a speech later, avoid this combination!

On boats in the Mess, during social events we used to float a rum on a Diamond White. It was known as a Purple Parachute aka 'knicker dropper'! (Obvs when there were bus-loads of nurses involved!!)
 

philc

LE
Seaview is a nice drop, however a good champagne is hard to beat, if any of you are in the region I recommend an over night, some bargains to be had in some very fancy places.

We stoped enroute for lunch going home a few times. Once got chatting to the sommelier as he clocked the 110, he had done some Paris-Dakar stuff. Unfortunately I had a room booked in Beaune, other wise would of spent the afternoon sampling his wares, which he was happy to give us for free.
 
I dislike Champagne - actually, any sparkling wine I can take only very sparingly as it seems to encourage reflux.

Oysters - Salty phlegm (and once a peasant staple eschewed by toffs)

Caviar - Unpleasant fishy tasting tapioca pudding

Foie gras - The attraction seems to be concomitant with the level of suffering caused to the goose.

Lobster - Quite nice but an awful lot of faffing about for a poor return

Langoustine - Even more of a faff for an even poorer return

Wagyu beef - Never tried it but can it really be so good that it's worth mortgaging away your life?

White truffle - Dug up by pigs because it shares the pheromone odour of a sow in season. Mmmmmm!

I think perhaps I was born to be a peasant.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Oi, that's sparkling pink, you pooftah!

OZ

Oooooh get HER :-D

It's great for seducing young ladies, so my mate Casanunder tells me !
 

chimera

LE
Moderator
If he is I am not. Ice cold sparkling Red and ice cold 'normal' red is the drink of champions.

Was weaned on it as a young pup back in Italy. The locals all drink it and when in Rome.....

On the odd occasion I am in Rome, I might give it a go. I guess like Aperol, it needs to fit the occasion. I had some red fizz this summer (French), and to be honest, other than the novelty, it was horrible - a bit like drinking flat cool aid.

Anywhere else, I am afraid it has to be something from Eperney, Reims, or the Aube. Most of the cheap supermarket champagne in the UK is the sh*t the French houses want to get rid of (don't worry -- the really bad stuff goes to Belgium, or they chuck in a few extra handfuls of sugar and send it to Russia with a fancy label and sell it for E1000 a bottle).

Anything champagne in the UK under £25 - £30 a bottle will be thin, incipid rubbish. That is not being a wine snob, just reality - as with everything you get what you pay for. As @dingerr said above, if you want good champagne, Pol Roger from the "big names" is as good as you need to go, but there are some great little smaller, independent, houses, but you generally won't see them sold outside France. Otherwise, English sparkling, French "method" cremant (i.e. same grapes and production technique etc, just not from the exact Champagne region), and a few Cavas are just as good. Prosecco, IMHO, is too sweet, and has been over marketed.
 
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Aldi here in Germany generally have a very drinkable Cremant de Loire in stock for about 6 Euros, and Mums Sekt isn't half bad either which can be had on sale for about 4 Euros.
My wife is from Burgundy and introduced me Cremant de Bourgoyne and to the excellent aperitifs that the Burgundians try to keep to themselves. Kir (Blackcurrant Liqueur and Bourgogne Aligote white wine) is the nectar of the Gods - even better is Kir Royale (Blackcurrant Liqueur and Cremant) sets you up nicely for a bottle of Cotes de Beaune with a long lunch. The Cremants tend to be a bit sweeter than Champagne which suits me - dry bubbly does not agree with my stomach.

The Champagne houses are quietly buying up land on the South Downs as the chalky soil is the same as the Champagne region and with Global Warning (!) they reckon they will have to shift production there in a few years.
 
30 years ago, Sainsbury's used to flog an own-brand sekt. Rather nice it was too, speaking as someone who can't abide champagne or the vinegar that passes for French wine. It was quite a bargain too, being priced somewhere between Black Tower and the cheapest champagne.

Don't know why it stopped being sold though I suspect it was because people weren't buying it because it wasn't sufficiently overpriced.
 
The Champagne houses are quietly buying up land on the South Downs as the chalky soil is the same as the Champagne region and with Global Warning (!) they reckon they will have to shift production there in a few years.

It's going to be interesting hearing them argue that they can make Champagne outside the protected region but no-one else can.
 
...

The Champagne houses are quietly buying up land on the South Downs as the chalky soil is the same as the Champagne region and with Global Warning (!) they reckon they will have to shift production there in a few years.
See Post #25.
ETA: Taittinger planted its first vines at Chilham, Kent, in 2017.
First bottles of Taittinger’s ‘English Sparkling’ due to roll out of their new winery in 2024.
 

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