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The farming and smallholding thread

I’d say another problem is farmers buying up farms.

Every time a farm comes up for sale up here it gets snapped up by the farmer who lives next door.

You can never have too much land / outbuildings.

I’d do it if the place that borders mine came up for sale.

However, we need to remember that these are not just nice properties, with a lifestyle attached, but fairly big businesses with large turnovers.

Why shouldn’t they command a high price?

No one bemoans the lack of opportunities for young people to buy factories or quarries or any other business really.

It’s expected that to buy your own business, you need some capital behind you first. This means it’s invariably people in their 40s plus who buy farms. Makes perfect sense to me.

Having said that, there are still hundreds, if not thousands of tenant farms up here. Most are on multi generational AHA leases, but they do come up for lease occasionally.
Much agreement. However, I still hold that land is overpriced, certainly when you compare price per acre with £s output per acre. I know what my gross margin/acre is, and it would take me an awfully long time to earn £8000.
 

9.414

Old-Salt
There is always a perceived bonus on land next door to your own that makes it worth more to an adjacent farmer than to a new incomer.

There is the time honoured reality that they are not making any more of it and it only comes up for sale very infrequently. Although when a foreign investor buys it, they can't take it home with them when they decide to abandon these shores ;)
 
I mentioned a few posts back that we were thinking of investing in a 5 metre Lemken Karat cultivator, with an airseeder on it. Today I tried a 4 metre one ( many thanks Redlynch ) and was very impressed by it.
On reflection, given the uncerrainty over Brexit and ELMS, we are going to stay with our current set-up of a set of Cousins pigtail tines followed by either the Carrier or Vadersradt spring tines. The Carrier is ancient and will just about do another 500 acres, it isn't worth refurbing it, so we will look for another second hand one through Redlynch in a years time. The Cousins cost bugger all, is ancient, and is as simple as a simple thing; it is also built out girders, and having put tungsten tips on it I fully expect it to be in work when ths children are running the place.
 
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Too wet to get on with the last 26 acres of oats to drill, do a visit from the beagles was a nice distraction.
ETA If we were National Trust tenants the beagles wouldn't have been allowed.
20201024_113626_compress36.jpg
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Published by: Philip Case, FARMERS WEEKLY, ON 22 October 2020.

Shock as Red Tractor chair votes ‘to lower food standards’

Farm leaders have expressed disbelief after the chair of the company behind the Red Tractor Assurance scheme voted against measures aimed at protecting British farmers from cheap food imports post Brexit.


Baroness Lucy Neville-Rolfe was appointed as chair of Assured Food Standards (ASF), the company which owns Red Tractor Assurance, in November 2017.

She joined the House of Lords as a Conservative peer in October 2013.

In the House of Lords on Tuesday (20 October), peers voted on important amendments to insert powers in the Agriculture Bill, which aim to protect British farmers from future trade deals that risk flooding the UK market with cheap food imports.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe voted against the Lord Curry amendment 18B requiring the new Trade and Agriculture Commission to submit reports on international trade agreements and their effect on farming for parliamentary scrutiny.

She also voted against the second amendment by Labour peer Lord Grantchester, which seeks to strengthen food standards for imported food, to ensure they meet relevant UK food standards after the Brexit transition ends.

The government was defeated on both votes, with a number of Conservative peers backing the farming industry. The bill will now return to the House of Commons on 4 November when MPs will be under pressure to accept the amendments.

Commenting this week on the appointment of professor Guy Poppy, former Food Standards Agency chief scientific adviser to the AFS board, Baroness Neville-Rolfe said: “This is a critically important time for Red Tractor to demonstrate strong leadership in protecting the integrity of the food chain and British agricultural standards.

“Our standards are the bedrock of the farming industry – it is our duty to understand the implications of any changes in approach to the science of food production and farming.”

‘Farmers betrayed’ . . . .

Liz Webster, chair of campaign group Save British Farming (SBF), said she was shocked by Baroness Neville-Rolfe’s voting decisions.

“It’s more obfuscation and more proof that farmers are being betrayed,” said Ms Webster. “It’s clear that we [farmers] are being frogmarched into retirement.

“In my view, this seriously undermines faith in the Red Tractor assurance scheme.”

She added: “The British public has been misled time and time again by this government, particularly on Brexit and food standards.

“Why did the Conservatives promise in their 2019 election manifesto to uphold farmers’ standards if they have no intention to do so?”

A farming industry leader, who did not want to be named, said: “This is quite worrying. There are quite a few farmers struggling with confidence in Red Tractor at the moment. This appears to confirm some fears.”

Oxford educated . . . .

Before she was appointed ASF chair, Baroness Neville-Rolfe spent 15 years at Tesco where she was an executive director on the main board from 2006 to 2013.

Until 1997, she was a senior civil servant in the Cabinet Office, the prime minister’s policy unit and the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF).

Baroness Neville-Rolfe was brought up on a mixed farm in Wiltshire, was convent educated and studied philosophy, politics and economics at Oxford University.

Farmers Weekly contacted Baroness Lucy Neville-Rolfe to request a response. Here is what she said:

“The UK is currently negotiating trade arrangements with the EU and many other countries reflecting the end of the transitional period on the 31 December 2020. These are very difficult negotiations which are likely to have a serious effect on our prosperity for many years.

“I have experience of international negotiation – for example on the EU sheepmeat regime when I was an official in the Agriculture ministry. I know that it is highly desirable to allow UK negotiators maximum flexibility so that they can obtain the best overall deal for the country as a whole.

“In parliament there are many attempts to limit our negotiators in one way or another by trying to make this or that concept either essential or unacceptable. The risk is that if UK negotiators are limited in this way the eventual outcome will be worse, overall, for the UK than it would otherwise have been.

“In short, I am wary of all attempts to shackle our negotiators. We have to let them do their best.

“None of this implies that interests, including agricultural interests, should not exert pressure on the government to seek the outcomes they want. Of course they do and sometimes the government accept them.

“But trying to impose limitations by statute on the government is in my view not the best way to do it. Those outside the negotiations, including me, simply do not have enough knowledge of the detail to judge what will work.

“My votes in parliament were based on this appreciation of the realities.”

1603541107054.png

[photo: Baroness Lucy Neville-Rolfe © Richard Gardner/ShutterstockBaroness Lucy Neville-Rolfe © Richard Gardner/Shutterstock].


Also posted on the "What now for EU (after BREXIT) thread; and, the general "All Inter-web video and links" thread.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
Published by: Philip Case, FARMERS WEEKLY, ON 22 October 2020.

Shock as Red Tractor chair votes ‘to lower food standards’

Farm leaders have expressed disbelief after the chair of the company behind the Red Tractor Assurance scheme voted against measures aimed at protecting British farmers from cheap food imports post Brexit.

Baroness Lucy Neville-Rolfe was appointed as chair of Assured Food Standards (ASF), the company which owns Red Tractor Assurance, in November 2017.

She joined the House of Lords as a Conservative peer in October 2013.

In the House of Lords on Tuesday (20 October), peers voted on important amendments to insert powers in the Agriculture Bill, which aim to protect British farmers from future trade deals that risk flooding the UK market with cheap food imports.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe voted against the Lord Curry amendment 18B requiring the new Trade and Agriculture Commission to submit reports on international trade agreements and their effect on farming for parliamentary scrutiny.

She also voted against the second amendment by Labour peer Lord Grantchester, which seeks to strengthen food standards for imported food, to ensure they meet relevant UK food standards after the Brexit transition ends.

The government was defeated on both votes, with a number of Conservative peers backing the farming industry. The bill will now return to the House of Commons on 4 November when MPs will be under pressure to accept the amendments.

Commenting this week on the appointment of professor Guy Poppy, former Food Standards Agency chief scientific adviser to the AFS board, Baroness Neville-Rolfe said: “This is a critically important time for Red Tractor to demonstrate strong leadership in protecting the integrity of the food chain and British agricultural standards.

“Our standards are the bedrock of the farming industry – it is our duty to understand the implications of any changes in approach to the science of food production and farming.”

‘Farmers betrayed’ . . . .

Liz Webster, chair of campaign group Save British Farming (SBF), said she was shocked by Baroness Neville-Rolfe’s voting decisions.

“It’s more obfuscation and more proof that farmers are being betrayed,” said Ms Webster. “It’s clear that we [farmers] are being frogmarched into retirement.

“In my view, this seriously undermines faith in the Red Tractor assurance scheme.”

She added: “The British public has been misled time and time again by this government, particularly on Brexit and food standards.

“Why did the Conservatives promise in their 2019 election manifesto to uphold farmers’ standards if they have no intention to do so?”

A farming industry leader, who did not want to be named, said: “This is quite worrying. There are quite a few farmers struggling with confidence in Red Tractor at the moment. This appears to confirm some fears.”

Oxford educated . . . .

Before she was appointed ASF chair, Baroness Neville-Rolfe spent 15 years at Tesco where she was an executive director on the main board from 2006 to 2013.

Until 1997, she was a senior civil servant in the Cabinet Office, the prime minister’s policy unit and the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF).

Baroness Neville-Rolfe was brought up on a mixed farm in Wiltshire, was convent educated and studied philosophy, politics and economics at Oxford University.

Farmers Weekly contacted Baroness Lucy Neville-Rolfe to request a response. Here is what she said:

“The UK is currently negotiating trade arrangements with the EU and many other countries reflecting the end of the transitional period on the 31 December 2020. These are very difficult negotiations which are likely to have a serious effect on our prosperity for many years.

“I have experience of international negotiation – for example on the EU sheepmeat regime when I was an official in the Agriculture ministry. I know that it is highly desirable to allow UK negotiators maximum flexibility so that they can obtain the best overall deal for the country as a whole.

“In parliament there are many attempts to limit our negotiators in one way or another by trying to make this or that concept either essential or unacceptable. The risk is that if UK negotiators are limited in this way the eventual outcome will be worse, overall, for the UK than it would otherwise have been.

“In short, I am wary of all attempts to shackle our negotiators. We have to let them do their best.

“None of this implies that interests, including agricultural interests, should not exert pressure on the government to seek the outcomes they want. Of course they do and sometimes the government accept them.

“But trying to impose limitations by statute on the government is in my view not the best way to do it. Those outside the negotiations, including me, simply do not have enough knowledge of the detail to judge what will work.

“My votes in parliament were based on this appreciation of the realities.”

View attachment 514652
[photo: Baroness Lucy Neville-Rolfe © Richard Gardner/ShutterstockBaroness Lucy Neville-Rolfe © Richard Gardner/Shutterstock].


Also posted on the "What now for EU (after BREXIT) thread; and, the general "All Inter-web video and links" thread.
Look at her background. Industrial corporate farming. Ideal for the EU facing role, but perhaps we need someone different for our independent future.
 
Published by: Philip Case, FARMERS WEEKLY, ON 22 October 2020.

Shock as Red Tractor chair votes ‘to lower food standards’

Farm leaders have expressed disbelief after the chair of the company behind the Red Tractor Assurance scheme voted against measures aimed at protecting British farmers from cheap food imports post Brexit.

Baroness Lucy Neville-Rolfe was appointed as chair of Assured Food Standards (ASF), the company which owns Red Tractor Assurance, in November 2017.

She joined the House of Lords as a Conservative peer in October 2013.

In the House of Lords on Tuesday (20 October), peers voted on important amendments to insert powers in the Agriculture Bill, which aim to protect British farmers from future trade deals that risk flooding the UK market with cheap food imports.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe voted against the Lord Curry amendment 18B requiring the new Trade and Agriculture Commission to submit reports on international trade agreements and their effect on farming for parliamentary scrutiny.

She also voted against the second amendment by Labour peer Lord Grantchester, which seeks to strengthen food standards for imported food, to ensure they meet relevant UK food standards after the Brexit transition ends.

The government was defeated on both votes, with a number of Conservative peers backing the farming industry. The bill will now return to the House of Commons on 4 November when MPs will be under pressure to accept the amendments.

Commenting this week on the appointment of professor Guy Poppy, former Food Standards Agency chief scientific adviser to the AFS board, Baroness Neville-Rolfe said: “This is a critically important time for Red Tractor to demonstrate strong leadership in protecting the integrity of the food chain and British agricultural standards.

“Our standards are the bedrock of the farming industry – it is our duty to understand the implications of any changes in approach to the science of food production and farming.”

‘Farmers betrayed’ . . . .

Liz Webster, chair of campaign group Save British Farming (SBF), said she was shocked by Baroness Neville-Rolfe’s voting decisions.

“It’s more obfuscation and more proof that farmers are being betrayed,” said Ms Webster. “It’s clear that we [farmers] are being frogmarched into retirement.

“In my view, this seriously undermines faith in the Red Tractor assurance scheme.”

She added: “The British public has been misled time and time again by this government, particularly on Brexit and food standards.

“Why did the Conservatives promise in their 2019 election manifesto to uphold farmers’ standards if they have no intention to do so?”

A farming industry leader, who did not want to be named, said: “This is quite worrying. There are quite a few farmers struggling with confidence in Red Tractor at the moment. This appears to confirm some fears.”

Oxford educated . . . .

Before she was appointed ASF chair, Baroness Neville-Rolfe spent 15 years at Tesco where she was an executive director on the main board from 2006 to 2013.

Until 1997, she was a senior civil servant in the Cabinet Office, the prime minister’s policy unit and the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF).

Baroness Neville-Rolfe was brought up on a mixed farm in Wiltshire, was convent educated and studied philosophy, politics and economics at Oxford University.

Farmers Weekly contacted Baroness Lucy Neville-Rolfe to request a response. Here is what she said:

“The UK is currently negotiating trade arrangements with the EU and many other countries reflecting the end of the transitional period on the 31 December 2020. These are very difficult negotiations which are likely to have a serious effect on our prosperity for many years.

“I have experience of international negotiation – for example on the EU sheepmeat regime when I was an official in the Agriculture ministry. I know that it is highly desirable to allow UK negotiators maximum flexibility so that they can obtain the best overall deal for the country as a whole.

“In parliament there are many attempts to limit our negotiators in one way or another by trying to make this or that concept either essential or unacceptable. The risk is that if UK negotiators are limited in this way the eventual outcome will be worse, overall, for the UK than it would otherwise have been.

“In short, I am wary of all attempts to shackle our negotiators. We have to let them do their best.

“None of this implies that interests, including agricultural interests, should not exert pressure on the government to seek the outcomes they want. Of course they do and sometimes the government accept them.

“But trying to impose limitations by statute on the government is in my view not the best way to do it. Those outside the negotiations, including me, simply do not have enough knowledge of the detail to judge what will work.

“My votes in parliament were based on this appreciation of the realities.”

View attachment 514652
[photo: Baroness Lucy Neville-Rolfe © Richard Gardner/ShutterstockBaroness Lucy Neville-Rolfe © Richard Gardner/Shutterstock].


Also posted on the "What now for EU (after BREXIT) thread; and, the general "All Inter-web video and links" thread.
Weasel words.
 
What’s the reckoning in return per acre? I was trying to do the maths on the shoot today, acres of cover crop in otherwise good land. How do you work out if it would be value for money?
 
What’s the reckoning in return per acre? I was trying to do the maths on the shoot today, acres of cover crop in otherwise good land. How do you work out if it would be value for money?
Do a gross margin comparison. If you need figures John Nix will be able to provide them (Google), otherwise I will pm you my figures over the weekend.
 
Do a gross margin comparison. If you need figures John Nix will be able to provide them (Google), otherwise I will pm you my figures over the weekend.
Thank you very much, I am away at my Mrs’ cottage this weekend. Weather looks crap so once the dog has been walked I can google away to my heart’s content.
 
What is it in pig shite that makes it smell like it does?
A combination of ammonia , hydrogen sulphide, and byproducts of the bacteria breaking down.
I live next to pig farm which l would consider industrial in size and they feed them a diet with whey they get from a cheese factory as the main ingredient. The pigs shïte pure liquid which is a tad more revolting than regular and is a real treat when it’s spread on the field bordering my land if the wind is blowing. Depending on time of year the shïte can be injected into the ground which isn’t too bad, but generally in early spring and fall it’s sprayed into the air to fall like rain, that’s fücking gagging...
 

load_fin

War Hero
A combination of ammonia , hydrogen sulphide, and byproducts of the bacteria breaking down.
I live next to pig farm which l would consider industrial in size and they feed them a diet with whey they get from a cheese factory as the main ingredient. The pigs shïte pure liquid which is a tad more revolting than regular and is a real treat when it’s spread on the field bordering my land if the wind is blowing. Depending on time of year the shïte can be injected into the ground which isn’t too bad, but generally in early spring and fall it’s sprayed into the air to fall like rain, that’s fücking gagging...
Two words: sewage sludge.
Neighbour used it a few weeks ago. As well as the nauseating smell (real appetite suppressant for all the family), it gave us sore throats, runny eyes and a burning sensation in the nose. Most revolting smell I've ever smelled (smelt? Awaiting a pedant in 3, 2, 1...)
 
Two words: sewage sludge.
Neighbour used it a few weeks ago. As well as the nauseating smell (real appetite suppressant for all the family), it gave us sore throats, runny eyes and a burning sensation in the nose. Most revolting smell I've ever smelled (smelt? Awaiting a pedant in 3, 2, 1...)
That's normal here, you can only use whats in your own personel septic holding tank though, not anyone elses. Like pig shitë, they spray it as well but use a water type cannon and it can be a tad amusing watching used tampons flying through the air. Generally it's done in winter with snow on the ground and leaves lovely designs......But yes, your description is spot on.
 

load_fin

War Hero
That's normal here, you can only use whats in your own personel septic holding tank though, not anyone elses. Like pig shitë, they spray it as well but use a water type cannon and it can be a tad amusing watching used tampons flying through the air. Generally it's done in winter with snow on the ground and leaves lovely designs......But yes, your description is spot on.
I'm pretty sure that you can't use the contents of your own septic tank. Perpetuates a closed cycle, and that way lies BSE for humans.

In the UK, the water companies positively encourage farmers to take their sludge. Not sure if money changes hands, but I'm pretty sure they filter the tampons, wet wipes and plastic bog cleaners (those things that hang on the side of the pan) out of the sludge, so it's pure goodness.

Give me pig slurry any day.
 

load_fin

War Hero
Just my thoughts on the offensiveness of different wastes used as fertiliser (least to most horrible):

Farm yard manure (FYM) - semi solid mix of poo and bedding eg straw
Cow slurry (liquid cow poo)
Pig slurry
Poultry bedding (solid mix of chicken shit and bedding)
Sewage sludge

Of course, the end user effect depends on the application method - injection of liquids is far less offensive than spraying or spreading.
 

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