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The farming and smallholding thread

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
If it’s the 4 cyl 35. Welcome to a world of bad starting in cold weather.
they were allways a dog I’m afraid engine wise.
The 3 cyl 35 X is the one to grab if you see one.

Yep, so I’ve heard.

The family have owned this one since new so it has some sentimental value.

But yeah it’s not a great machine.

Although it’s red and it’s got a dog leg gearbox. It’s basically the same as a Ferrari.
95C33FA1-36CC-4E38-8978-50602FFA451E.jpeg
 

Oops

War Hero
Old (very old) Doris keeps getting pregnant, I'm not killing her with a calf inside, this greeted us a few mornings ago.
Trouble is, Doris is old enough not to be frightened of owt much, especially someone trying to interfere with the new Centre of her Universe.
IMG_20200910_112006.jpg

You have to let the calf develop a bit of fitness before introducing it to eartag regulations, especially when you know Mum is going to escalate the situation to 'dynamic'....
Better safe than sorry, even if we had cars stopping hurling abuse, cos we were chasing a tiny calf with a big telehandler, (that's the trouble with doing owt at weekends round here)
Anyway, message received and finally understood...
IMG_20200925_164537_compress92.jpg

Second Lass off to Uni tomorrow, " You can cook us steak tonight Dad, you do it better than Mum"....
IMG_20200925_202408.jpg

By pure chance it turns out it's Doris's daughter ,born three years ago...

Circle of life, an' all that.
 

anglo

LE
Old (very old) Doris keeps getting pregnant, I'm not killing her with a calf inside, this greeted us a few mornings ago.
Trouble is, Doris is old enough not to be frightened of owt much, especially someone trying to interfere with the new Centre of her Universe.
View attachment 507489
You have to let the calf develop a bit of fitness before introducing it to eartag regulations, especially when you know Mum is going to escalate the situation to 'dynamic'....
Better safe than sorry, even if we had cars stopping hurling abuse, cos we were chasing a tiny calf with a big telehandler, (that's the trouble with doing owt at weekends round here)
Anyway, message received and finally understood...
View attachment 507496
Second Lass off to Uni tomorrow, " You can cook us steak tonight Dad, you do it better than Mum"....
View attachment 507500
By pure chance it turns out it's Doris's daughter ,born three years ago...

Circle of life, an' all that.
If the old girl is still having calves surely she's paying her way, why have her put down,
or as her milk yield dropped?
 
If it’s the 4 cyl 35. Welcome to a world of bad starting in cold weather.
they were allways a dog I’m afraid engine wise.
The 3 cyl 35 X is the one to grab if you see one.
We had a 4cyl about 25 years ago, head off replaced valve guides ,new valves , reset timing and fuel pump serviced.






still needed towing in the cold, once going good for the day.
 

Oops

War Hero
If the old girl is still having calves surely she's paying her way, why have her put down,
or as her milk yield dropped?
Calving ( especially a huge calf such as this) puts a massive strain on the system.
The last thing you want is a cow 'running out of steam' and being UNable(edit) to stand and suckle her newborn.
The even worse scenario,....she goes knackered half way through calving, and you've a live calf literally half way out and stuck at the hips....
Watching a calf gasp for its first breaths whilst Mums' unable to push it out , is absolutely horrific.
The stories of hooking land rovers, etc. to the calf to pull em out aren't made up! ( I never have, but I have the strongest calving aid ( jack) on the market)
It rarely ends well.

I've shot a ( young) cow this year who's calf simply had one foot bent at the ankle inside.....
It wouldn't come,its head swells, then it dies ( once the umbilical's severed) and if you can't imagine how quick a cadaver starts decomposing at 39°C think slow cooker!
It cost £140 to dispose of, plus a £60 vet bill, she would've sold for £750 for beefburgers two months prior.
I can't afford many like that.
We caesarean a couple a year on average, <2%, apart from an inexperienced vet breaching the stomach, we've always had successful results. (touches wood)
With over 40 yrs of sticking my arm in, I'm pretty good at deciding whether they'll 'come' or it's a 'sidedoor job'...
Our Vet sends newly qualifieds, cos they know I'll be fair, dairy farmers maybe less so, they want 'Doris' in the parlour in two days time, the calf is incidental..

BTW.
Next time you listen to our NHS Heroes, or furloughed Graphic Designers and Advertising Executives etc. moaning about their lot..
Our newly qualified Vets start on £23k after 7 yrs training, and will come and perform a major operation in the middle of a Bank Holiday Sunday night, Xmas same, probably getting kicked , certainly getting p#ssed and sh#t on for about 275 quid....

I think they're mad.
They genuinely love it.
 
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Calving ( especially a huge calf such as this) puts a massive strain on the system.
The last thing you want is a cow 'running out of steam' and being able to stand and suckle her newborn.
The even worse scenario,....she goes knackered half way through calving, and you've a live calf literally half way out and stuck at the hips....
Watching a calf gasp for its first breaths whilst Mums' unable to push it out , is absolutely horrific.
The stories of hooking land rovers, etc. to the calf to pull em out aren't made up! ( I never have, but I have the strongest calving aid ( jack) on the market)
It rarely ends well.

I've shot a ( young) cow this year who's calf simply had one foot bent at the ankle inside.....
It wouldn't come,its head swells, then it dies ( once the umbilical's severed) and if you can't imagine how quick a cadaver starts decomposing at 39°C think slow cooker!
It cost £140 to dispose of, plus a £60 vet bill, she would've sold for £750 for beefburgers two months prior.
I can't afford many like that.
We caesarean a couple a year on average, <2%, apart from an inexperienced vet breaching the stomach, we've always had successful results. (touches wood)
With over 40 yrs of sticking my arm in, I'm pretty good at deciding whether they'll 'come' or it's a 'sidedoor job'...
Our Vet sends newly qualifieds, cos they know I'll be fair, dairy farmers maybe less so, they want 'Doris' in the parlour in two days time, the calf is incidental..

BTW.
Next time you listen to our NHS Heroes, or furloughed Graphic Designers and Advertising Executives etc. moaning about their lot..
Our newly qualified Vets start on £23k after 7 yrs training, and will come and perform a major operation in the middle of a Bank Holiday Sunday night, Xmas same, probably getting kicked , certainly getting p#ssed and sh#t on for about 275 quid....

I think they're mad.
They genuinely love it.
I doff my cap cap to farmers, a hard job in grim conditions.

Have you ever ejaculated whilst fisting a beast (and for clarification I don't mean your spouse)?
 
We had a 4cyl about 25 years ago, head off replaced valve guides ,new valves , reset timing and fuel pump serviced.






still needed towing in the cold, once going good for the day.
In the days before quad bikes and the ubiquitous 4wd golf carts all hill farms seem to have now, we shepherded on horseback (100 plus trekking horses helped) , and for bigger ( small) jobs we always had a couple of small tractors hanging about.
By far the most versatile were the predecessors to the 35x, two t20 ( grey Ferguson s) that had been converted, I would guess professionally, to take a Perkins p3.
The back of the bonnets were about 3” higher to take the taller engine and they were fitted with ex hurricane ki gas pumps on the dash.
We fitted them with twin back wheels and a cage transport box and you would be utterly amazed where they could go. ( and get out again).
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
In the days before quad bikes and the ubiquitous 4wd golf carts all hill farms seem to have now, we shepherded on horseback (100 plus trekking horses helped) , and for bigger ( small) jobs we always had a couple of small tractors hanging about.
By far the most versatile were the predecessors to the 35x, two t20 ( grey Ferguson s) that had been converted, I would guess professionally, to take a Perkins p3.
The back of the bonnets were about 3” higher to take the taller engine and they were fitted with ex hurricane ki gas pumps on the dash.
We fitted them with twin back wheels and a cage transport box and you would be utterly amazed where they could go. ( and get out again).
As I started my IT career at Perkins Engines, I am pleased that the product is still regarded highly. They were a good employer in the main and I still have a soft spot for them.
 
As I started my IT career at Perkins Engines, I am pleased that the product is still regarded highly. They were a good employer in the main and I still have a soft spot for them.
I must confess that I had a soft spot for the 2.0 diesel normally aspirated Perkins Prima engine in my old Maestro van. Pulled really well and sounded great
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
I must confess that I had a soft spot for the 2.0 diesel normally aspirated Perkins Prima engine in my old Maestro van. Pulled really well and sounded great
Ah, Project Iceberg, istr. Working with BL to produce smaller, lighter engines for cars.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
Wasn't Iceberg also the project to make the Rover/Buick V8 into a diesel ?
Perkins now owned by CAT I think .... hence JCB make their own engines , Manitou fit Merc engines... Massey now use Sisu engines ....
Crikey. It was owned by Massey Fergusson in my day. And I worked on the system that convinced Mr. Bamford to use our engines in his kit.

Time flies.
 

Oops

War Hero
I doff my cap cap to farmers, a hard job in grim conditions.

Have you ever ejaculated whilst ******* a beast (and for clarification I don't mean your spouse)?
Strangely enough, no.
Daughters have actually named one Claribelle cos it displays similar emotions to their mother whenever I'm in the vicinity...
Uncontrolled rage and an unhinged desire to wipe me off(or into) the Face of the Earth!
T'other side of a fence and ditch is near enough for both.
IMG-20200414-WA0000.jpeg

Old and droopy bagged...
Endex this winter.....

Oh, the bovine?
Sorry I was drifting......
 
Soybean harvest is in for 2020, finished up last night just after midnight, best yield in years, average of 53 bushels per acre. From reports it seems Ontario is in for a bumper crop of beans and corn and the drought stricken septics are going to be crying for more handouts as their production has suffered greatly.
Everything is still ahead of schedule and working the bean ground for winter wheat will start as soon as weather permits.

Earlier in the thread l had mentioned the possibility of a big livestock cull this fall due to lack of enough feed to hold over the animals that didn’t make it to slaughter, l am happy to say l am wrong at this point. Since the weather has been so favourable many hay producers are on their 4th cutting with a possible 5th if the weather holds, 2 is the normal here, occasionally 3. Combine that with high yielding corn there should be enough to feed to keep all the leftover cattle that didn’t make it to market this year happy and alive through the winter and early spring.
 
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Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
We’ve got this big heifer who has done us proud over the years. She won her class at the Great Yorkshire Show a few years back and has produced some cracking calfs over the years.

She’s 6 now and her bag has blown so she can’t feed. Too old for meat so we decided to give her one last go with a calf that we’ll let the kids hand rear. The last calf they raised on goat milk has turned out fantastically (pictured below).

Had her scanned today and there’s a healthy looking calf in there.

Happy.

Everything else on the farm looking good. Goats are still dicks. Also spotted a baby deer in one of the fields.
080F9F89-45E2-4724-AD20-9B11B71B64F9.jpeg
1559A7A4-67CC-408D-82BB-6A589623F3AA.jpeg
D5F6F6AB-A178-47CC-8E32-63490AE86290.jpeg
 

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