The farming and smallholding thread

They would be 15 000 broilers........ I take it that this isn’t happening in the UK?
With the way our trade works with the US, both sides of the border are getting hit badly in the Ag sector. The septics have been killing off roughly 700 000 pigs per week, as of May 5th they hit the 14 million mark in gassing broilers.
Thats a lot of pork and chicken , what are Septics eating instead ?
 
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It's been the perfect spring here, arable wise ( needed to be after last autumn)
I'm sure @Humble Tiller will give a more accurate report regarding cereal yield prospects, there's nothing going to break any records up here, theres still plenty of spring barley being sown after winter veg crops etc. Itll yield better than early 'mauled in' stuff that's for sure.
I believe snow is still being talked about with you?
We haven’t been hit with too much bad precipitation, just cold. Southern Ontario where I reside is generally quick to warm up, but we are still going below zero at night and the soil hasn’t remotely started to come up to a decent temp. Some started planting a few weeks ago when we had a warm break, but frost has decimated the seedlings that have popped up. As for snow it is expected this weekend, not a build up, just enough to make you shake your head.
 
It's been the perfect spring here, arable wise ( needed to be after last autumn)
I'm sure @Humble Tiller will give a more accurate report regarding cereal yield prospects, there's nothing going to break any records up here, theres still plenty of spring barley being sown after winter veg crops etc. Itll yield better than early 'mauled in' stuff that's for sure.
I believe snow is still being talked about with you?
I don't know about snow, its bloody boiling here.
The wheat looks well, as does the spring barley. The OSR doesn't look as bad as it did, but that could be wishful thinking as there is a lot of charlock in it.
Yield wise I can only speak for myself. The wheat should do 3.75 - 4 t/acre, the spring barley 2.2 -2.5 and the OSR any where from 0.6 -1 depending on whether you are going off area sown or area cut.
Our land will pretty much grow what it will grow, and it is only in exceptional years that there is a great variance either way. One thing that has improved wheat yields and organic matter indices is the chicken litter which goes on ahead of the wheat, especially now we are on our sixth or seventh year of using it.
As ever we need some rain now, something I never thought I would say after last winter.
 
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Thats a lot of pork and chicken , what are Septics eating in stead ?
The majority of what’s being culled was contracted out to the restaurant industry, the processing plant shut downs are what’s causing the septics grief with empty shop shelves. It is the result of letting only a few corporations control the meat end of the food chain, hopefully they will learn from it, but I’m doubtful. As for what they’re eating my guess is something chocked full of sugar.....
 
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The majority of what’s being culled was contracted out to the restaurant industry, the processing plant shut downs are what’s causing the septics grief with empty shop shelves. It is the result of letting only a few corporations control the meat end of the food chain, hopefully they will learn from it, but I’m doubtful. As for what they’re eating my guess is something chocked full of sugar.....
The quantities you quoted are huge so if Septics are still managing to maintain their 300lb sylphlike figures it goes to show how much is wasted in normal times , greedy wasteful cnuts.
 
Today watched as one of the chicken barns next to me had it’s residents gassed. The processors have to keep shutting down as employees test positive so there’s nowhere to send the birds and the new flock arrives in less than a week. Compared to the septics we in the north are getting off lightly.

Couldn't the farmers erect 30ft fibreglass baseball bats outside their gates, with a "Club your own... " sign ?
 

sand_rat

Old-Salt
I don't know about snow, its bloody boiling here.
The wheat looks well, as does the spring barley. The OSR doesn't look as bad as it did, but that could be wishful thinking as there is a lot of charlock in it.
Yield wise I can only speak for myself. The wheat should do 3.75 - 4 t/acre, the spring barley 2.2 -2.5 and the OSR any where from 0.6 -1 depending on whether you are going off area sown or area cut.
Our land will pretty much grow what it will grow, and it is only in exceptional years that there is a great variance either way. One thing that has improved wheat yields and organic matter indices is the chicken litter which goes on ahead of the wheat, especially now we are on our sixth or seventh year of using it.
As ever we need some rain now, something I never thought I would say after last winter.
H T had to Google OSR to find out what you were talking about!
PS for other Arrsers its Oil Seed Rape, that bright yellow plant you get by the field full. And dont say you all knew.
 
H T had to Google OSR to find out what you were talking about!
PS for other Arrsers its Oil Seed Rape, that bright yellow plant you get by the field full. And dont say you all knew.
Sorry, my fault for making assumptions, and we all know what happens when you assume.
One other point: due to the conditions making drilling winter wheat impossible for many farmers, the spring barley acreage is up by 47%. We shall see if it is worth combining, drying and storing it, I have my doubts.
 
Sorry, my fault for making assumptions, and we all know what happens when you assume.
One other point: due to the conditions making drilling winter wheat impossible for many farmers, the spring barley acreage is up by 47%. We shall see if it is worth combining, drying and storing it, I have my doubts.
Re the barley, is it sold to breweries and if so , are sales likely to be up or down?

Wondering if with all the pubs shut, breweries are concentrating on cans and bottles to offies and supermarkets or just cutting production generally.
 

sand_rat

Old-Salt
Sorry, my fault for making assumptions, and we all know what happens when you assume.
One other point: due to the conditions making drilling winter wheat impossible for many farmers, the spring barley acreage is up by 47%. We shall see if it is worth combining, drying and storing it, I have my doubts.
H T no need for apologies, and yes we do all know about assumptions, but please carry on with the posts, for many on here its a breath of fresh air, which when working on a farm doesnt leave you with much spare time.
 

Oops

Old-Salt
Sorry, my fault for making assumptions, and we all know what happens when you assume.
One other point: due to the conditions making drilling winter wheat impossible for many farmers, the spring barley acreage is up by 47%. We shall see if it is worth combining, drying and storing it, I have my doubts.
Our agronomist was talking about us being 1million acres down on wheat, making us nett importers. That in turn puts about £28/ ton on for shipping costs etc. Domestic stuff rises with it.
The compounders ( animal feed mfrs) will switch from wheat to barley for alot of their rations, this putting a 'botton' in the market this year.
@HT will tell you how much premium he needs to cover the 'faf' of producing malting barley,(we struggle to grow it here, too much residual nitrogen) some years there's a fair uplift, this year the difference in price between malting and feed is anyone's guess.....
The big local brewery has shut down, no pub trade, therefore there's nowt going in,there's no by product ( cattle food) coming out.
Dunno about anywhere else in the country, but it's not rained( bar 3mm) in seven weeks now...it always rains here.
People are already mentioning the 'D' word...
That's all we'd need, this year of any.
 
Re the barley, is it sold to breweries and if so , are sales likely to be up or down?

Wondering if with all the pubs shut, breweries are concentrating on cans and bottles to offies and supermarkets or just cutting production generally.
We sell it to a broker, such as Gleadall. Some people do grow under contract to brewers but it's a bit of a punt to take if it doesn't meet the spec.
 
Our agronomist was talking about us being 1million acres down on wheat, making us nett importers. That in turn puts about £28/ ton on for shipping costs etc. Domestic stuff rises with it.
The compounders ( animal feed mfrs) will switch from wheat to barley for alot of their rations, this putting a 'botton' in the market this year.
@HT will tell you how much premium he needs to cover the 'faf' of producing malting barley,(we struggle to grow it here, too much residual nitrogen) some years there's a fair uplift, this year the difference in price between malting and feed is anyone's guess.....
The big local brewery has shut down, no pub trade, therefore there's nowt going in,there's no by product ( cattle food) coming out.
Dunno about anywhere else in the country, but it's not rained( bar 3mm) in seven weeks now...it always rains here.
People are already mentioning the 'D' word...
That's all we'd need, this year of any.
My gross margin on spring barley is £219/acre selling at £150/ton. Feed barley as of 1/5/20 is £124/ton on average . It wasn't that long ago that feed barley went down to £80/ton, given the likely oversupply and uncertainty in the red meat market those halcyon days could be back again. If anyone would like to see a cashflow pm me.
 

Oops

Old-Salt
My gross margin on spring barley is £219/acre selling at £150/ton. Feed barley as of 1/5/20 is £124/ton on average . It wasn't that long ago that feed barley went down to £80/ton, given the likely oversupply and uncertainty in the red meat market those halcyon days could be back again. If anyone would like to see a cashflow pm me.
This ably demonstrates the old saying 'Up horn , down corn' ( and vice versa)
Pre injury, I used fatten bulls mainly, on intensive cereal and whole crop rations, land rent up here starts with a '3' so there's no way of growing enough grub ourselves.
To put things in perspective, when BSE hit in '96 our animal values dropped by 55% in the time Dorrell had finished reading his statement.
We were buying feed barley from a neighbour, cod and our transport, at
£125 /ton. Input costs compared to today were infinitesimally small, I think An was circa £85.
A 120 hp JD would be £30k.and with a man to sit on it cost no more than £15/hr to hire in!
The lowest I gave for barley off the combine afterwards was £67, (it was 19%) on the spin side in 2012 we sold wheat at £200 and fed the cattle spuds at £27/ton ..
Our 'spud man' has a Coors 5 yr malting contract, has very cagey at present about the T&C's therein, maybe that's why I'm struggling to draw my rent!
One things for sure this year, the usual paradigms are out of the window....
When a loo roll was worth more than a barrel of West Texas Intermediate, you just know we're in for a bumpy ride, sector wide...
I'm incredibly grateful for my lot, farming this side of the Pond being one of the greatest . A tenant farmer with unsympathetic landlords and no doubt I'd feel somewhat differently.
No two farms in the UK are the same, that's half of the battle.
 

magumba

Old-Salt
Face book is full of outraged bellends saying farmers should take on prisoners/doleys etc to pick fruit/veg , utter stupidity , theyve clearly never risen above the rank of labourer themselves ,WTF would a farmer want a bus load of paedos/murderers/terrorists and fat lazy cnuts turning up at their farm for training / work ?
charity shops seem to thrive on it
 

holyphuc

Old-Salt
Out of idle curiosity I have just dug out my father and grandfathers invoice book with some prices:
1961 price: value today: current price:
Fertiliser subsidy (yes really!) £64 12s 2d £1354 -
Bacon pig £16 2s 3d £337 £140
Potatoes 56kg £0 19 0d £20.17 £18
1966
35 Bacon pigs £598 9s 5d £10543.98 £4900
19t wheat £447 13s 4d £7887.08 £2850
subsidy on 1 ton fertiliser £8 8s 9d £148.65 -
1972
13 bacon pigs £233.95 £2158 £1820
1975
terraced house (workers accomodation) £1066 £6252 £175K
1977
1t barley £80.44 £350 £130
1 lamb £32.61 £141.66 £4.56/kg deadweight depending on carcass weight and conformation see Oops post below
1982
1t oats £98 £241 £110
1984
1t wheat £103 £231 £150
Some prices would vary wildly every year, potatoes for example, I remember as a kid selling them for £5 at the door after the drought, that would be £25 for a 56lb/25kg bag in todays money. WTF did we do with all the money!?
In the 60's 70's we were a proper mixed farm with cows, sheep, pigs. That gradually changed, as did most of the other farms, 'specialising' in grain and potatoes in the 80's & 90's and now just grains.
The columns get squashed up when I post it, prices read left to right: price then: value in todays money:
todays price.
 
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magumba

Old-Salt
Out of idle curiosity I have just dug out my father and grandfathers invoice book with some prices:
1961 price: value today: current price:
Fertiliser subsidy (yes really!) £64 12s 2d £1354 -
Bacon pig £16 2s 3d £337 £140
Potatoes 56kg £0 19 0d £20.17 £18
1966
35 Bacon pigs £598 9s 5d £10543.98 £4900
19t wheat £447 13s 4d £7887.08 £2850
subsidy on 1 ton fertiliser £8 8s 9d £148.65 -
1972
13 bacon pigs £233.95 £2158 £1820
1975
terraced house (workers accomodation) £1066 £6252 £175K
1977
1t barley £80.44 £350 £130
1 lamb £32.61 £141.66 £166 AHDB figures per kg so not sure about whole lamb prices.]
1982
1t oats £98 £241 £110
1984
1t wheat £103 £231 £150
Some prices would vary wildly every year, potatoes for example, I remember as a kid selling them for £5 at the door after the drought, that would be £25 for a 56lb/25kg bag in todays money. WTF did we do with all the money!?
In the 60's 70's we were a proper mixed farm with cows, sheep, pigs. That gradually changed, as did most of the other farms, 'specialising' in grain and potatoes in the 80's & 90's and now just grains.
The columns get squashed up when I post it, prices read left to right: price then: value in todays money:
todays price.
56kg of tatties in 1961 ?......trend setters ?...early adopters of the metric system ?
 

Oops

Old-Salt
New season lamb circa £100
Hoggs a tenner less.

Excellent and informative post,
As an addendum the wool clip used to pay the shepherds wages, accommodation an all.
Now it's a nett cost.
Slaughter costs for a bullock were nil(5th quarter covered it)up to '96 now it's £100+.

Re. The money...
My Grandfather 'blew' it all on fancy cars/ shooting and fishing.
Buying small farms and flogging the yards off to developers was in its infancy in the '60s, he did it twice and then kinda thought they'd enough!
The blokes that really prospered started with nowt, and were therefore 'hungry' for success....
Plus ça change.
 

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