The farming and smallholding thread

Tyk

LE
I am what l consider extremely lucky when it comes to locally sourced food. l trade the use of some of my land to a few hunters l know and they give me finished venison in return. My mate raises beef which l trade some field crop for so l know the cows diets, and l grow all my own long storable vegetables. Pork l source from a neighbour, and not that long ago l still had my own flock of chickens, a mix of layers and broilers. If it can be grown or raised in Canada, it will be available in my region. The only issue happening now is that quite a few farmers are moving away from growing vegetables in greenhouses in the cold months to producing cannabis as the income return is much higher.

I can imagine the appeal of a serious cash crop to folks with the existing greenhouses.
Out of interest do you know how that crop fits in with the classic soil rotation or is that no longer a consideration with greenhouses?
 
I can imagine the appeal of a serious cash crop to folks with the existing greenhouses.
Out of interest do you know how that crop fits in with the classic soil rotation or is that no longer a consideration with greenhouses?
Green house growers who have moved into cannabis for the most part have abandoned rotation and are now strictly growing just that. The majority of greenhouse farmers have land which they still plant vegetables during the traditional season, the houses are generally built on poor non productive land. The big advantage was with such a short growing season it allowed people access to fresh vegetables in the middle of a dark Canadian winter rather than buying imports from the US and South America. As with most supply and demand driven products, hothouse vegetables are still available but since there is now less being grown the prices have constantly risen.

The main appeal with growing greenhouse cannabis is the regulations regarding security required compared to those with just open land. If l wanted to grow cannabis l would have to spend a beyond ridiculous amount of money to have high security fencing topped with razor wire around my fields and numerous remote cameras. A greenhouse just requires door locks and a few cameras which were most likely in place so the getting a license to grow for them is more than easy.
 
Hopefully, others will also wish to Sign & Share . . .

 
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We have been classified as being in a High Risk area for Bovine TB, and so must be tested every six months, as opposed to annually. Getting all the cattle in twice a year is a massive PITA with our wild and wooly creatures, so we are reducing numbers where we can. To that end we caught up the this year's three bull calves today, and hopefully they will go on Tuesday.
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I have been testing the grain in store for temperature and moisture content, both as a management tool and because ACCS requires it. Some of the wheat seems to be a bit warm, so whenever a cold spell is forecast the fans get put on, to drive some cold dry air through the corn.
The grazier has moved his sheep off our place, they will return for lambing in late March early April. Our ram has met up again with his ladies, although they only number six this year, next year there will be twelve to breed from, and so soon we could potentially have quite a respectable number.
There is a s##t ton of fencing repairs to be done, as well as ear tag replacing on cattle various, as well as tree care and some general housekeeping to take care of. I'm not going to honk though, not when the picture below is part of my daily 'commute'.
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Londo

LE
View attachment 619887
We have been classified as being in a High Risk area for Bovine TB, and so must be tested every six months, as opposed to annually. Getting all the cattle in twice a year is a massive PITA with our wild and wooly creatures, so we are reducing numbers where we can. To that end we caught up the this year's three bull calves today, and hopefully they will go on Tuesday.
View attachment 619888
I have been testing the grain in store for temperature and moisture content, both as a management tool and because ACCS requires it. Some of the wheat seems to be a bit warm, so whenever a cold spell is forecast the fans get put on, to drive some cold dry air through the corn.
The grazier has moved his sheep off our place, they will return for lambing in late March early April. Our ram has met up again with his ladies, although they only number six this year, next year there will be twelve to breed from, and so soon we could potentially have quite a respectable number.
There is a s##t ton of fencing repairs to be done, as well as ear tag replacing on cattle various, as well as tree care and some general housekeeping to take care of. I'm not going to honk though, not when the picture below is part of my daily 'commute'. View attachment 619891
Thank you for your never ending hard work keeping all us plebs fed .
 
Thank you for your never ending hard work keeping all us plebs fed .
I don't do bugger all compared to 99.9% of people who go out to work for someone else, and endure a commute, HR, petty office politics, bullying, safety issues, site issues and all the other stuff.
I am incredibly fortunate to be in the position that I am, living a life that is the envy of many, and doing something that I believe in, and being answerable to no-one but myself.
It isn't hard work, it is, in my case, a privilege.
 
View attachment 619887
We have been classified as being in a High Risk area for Bovine TB, and so must be tested every six months, as opposed to annually. Getting all the cattle in twice a year is a massive PITA with our wild and wooly creatures, so we are reducing numbers where we can. To that end we caught up the this year's three bull calves today, and hopefully they will go on Tuesday.
View attachment 619888
I have been testing the grain in store for temperature and moisture content, both as a management tool and because ACCS requires it. Some of the wheat seems to be a bit warm, so whenever a cold spell is forecast the fans get put on, to drive some cold dry air through the corn.
The grazier has moved his sheep off our place, they will return for lambing in late March early April. Our ram has met up again with his ladies, although they only number six this year, next year there will be twelve to breed from, and so soon we could potentially have quite a respectable number.
There is a s##t ton of fencing repairs to be done, as well as ear tag replacing on cattle various, as well as tree care and some general housekeeping to take care of. I'm not going to honk though, not when the picture below is part of my daily 'commute'. View attachment 619891
Are you fitted out with an agitator or sweep to mix the grain about when drying?
 

Londo

LE
I don't do bugger all compared to 99.9% of people who go out to work for someone else, and endure a commute, HR, petty office politics, bullying, safety issues, site issues and all the other stuff.
I am incredibly fortunate to be in the position that I am, living a life that is the envy of many, and doing something that I believe in, and being answerable to no-one but myself.
It isn't hard work, it is, in my case, a privilege.
You do a job many others would be incapable of doing . For which we are thankful .
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

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holyphuc

Old-Salt
I have been testing the grain in store for temperature and moisture content, both as a management tool and because ACCS requires it. Some of the wheat seems to be a bit warm, so whenever a cold spell is forecast the fans get put on, to drive some cold dry air through the corn.
I've just had my inspection, they now want us to use the AHDB storage calculator, my spreadsheet is not good enough
 

holyphuc

Old-Salt
I'm not disputing the quality of American or Argentinian beef at all, the US, Argentina Chile are famed for their beef. My point is that they should not have access to our market if they use methods of production banned here.
That is my beef with their beef. (Hat, coat, is that my cattle wagon.........).
Same with grain, how many chemicals have we been banned from using that are still OK to use abroad?
@HLD DMR do your farms have to pay for an annual inspection to be able to sell grain? If I loose my accredited status I can still sell, but at a discount of £10-20/t, this grain then enters the chain and mysteriously becomes 'assured' again, all this was set up by our own NFU or national farmers union often known as the no f**king use, my inspector recently asked to see the invoice for the diesel I use to fire the dryer for grain drying. WTF do they think I'm going to do, water it down?
 

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
View attachment 619887
We have been classified as being in a High Risk area for Bovine TB, and so must be tested every six months, as opposed to annually. Getting all the cattle in twice a year is a massive PITA with our wild and wooly creatures, so we are reducing numbers where we can. To that end we caught up the this year's three bull calves today, and hopefully they will go on Tuesday.
View attachment 619888
I have been testing the grain in store for temperature and moisture content, both as a management tool and because ACCS requires it. Some of the wheat seems to be a bit warm, so whenever a cold spell is forecast the fans get put on, to drive some cold dry air through the corn.
The grazier has moved his sheep off our place, they will return for lambing in late March early April. Our ram has met up again with his ladies, although they only number six this year, next year there will be twelve to breed from, and so soon we could potentially have quite a respectable number.
There is a s##t ton of fencing repairs to be done, as well as ear tag replacing on cattle various, as well as tree care and some general housekeeping to take care of. I'm not going to honk though, not when the picture below is part of my daily 'commute'. View attachment 619891

You cannot have both a Like and an Informative button for one post.
 

holyphuc

Old-Salt
I

I think they dish out a couple of non compliances on every ACCS inspection to justify their existence. As for chemicals, the OSR/neoniconotids farce is a case in point.
got a non conformance for not having a "no naked flames or smoking" sign on the spray shed door. £1.99 on ebay arrived next day, now got to put it up and submit a photo, shall I put it on upside down?
 

jinxy

LE
Ditto. The furthest afield our meat comes from is @Humble Tiller an hour away. Game and stuff he doesn't sell come from our local butcher, who grows his beef on his farm halfway between us and the shop and gets lamb and pork from.his mates in Tisbury. Venison, partridge and pheasant are all grown in Dorset.

No vineyards we can afford yet, but plenty of local veg, plus what we grow.
There is a Vineyard not too far from you, Begins with L and ends ham. Also, Tisbury? I know one of the game hunters, I fixed his cold room :)
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

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There is a Vineyard not too far from you, Begins with L and ends ham. Also, Tisbury? I know one of the game hunters, I fixed his cold room :)
I know the vineyard. Haven't visited yet. It's on the to-do list..
 
Same with grain, how many chemicals have we been banned from using that are still OK to use abroad?
@HLD DMR do your farms have to pay for an annual inspection to be able to sell grain? If I loose my accredited status I can still sell, but at a discount of £10-20/t, this grain then enters the chain and mysteriously becomes 'assured' again, all this was set up by our own NFU or national farmers union often known as the no f**king use, my inspector recently asked to see the invoice for the diesel I use to fire the dryer for grain drying. WTF do they think I'm going to do, water it down?
The only inspections on farms here is for animal welfare and quality such as dairy and poultry and workers safety, nothing at all for grain or other cash crops.
 

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