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The farming and smallholding thread

Being the soft git that I am, this old Doris lost her calf last year, but instead of cashing her in (helluva beef trade at he time too) I gave her another chance.
When she stuffed her face with veg she was as wide as tall, I guessed twins.
Shipped her up to my more capable mate's maternity unit last week, just in time!
IMG-20210219-WA0004.jpg

As you can see she looked a bit worse for wear, after parting with two giant bull calves, so an emergency dash, down three motorways 50 odd miles, various drugs, potions, tubes and syringes and lots of post partum aggression and by late evening all look fit to survive the night...
Rinse and repeat tomorrow, but she'd better find some milk fast, as dried colostrum at sixty quid a bucket doesn't last long between two bruisers.
IMG_20210219_151452_compress11.jpg


As an aside, he's started lambing
(multiples always come first) 80 odd live lambs, 1 dead off only 27 ewes....
Phenomenal, but one helluva long and stressful day..
See what morning brings!
 

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Being the soft git that I am, this old Doris lost her calf last year, but instead of cashing her in (helluva beef trade at he time too) I gave her another chance.
When she stuffed her face with veg she was as wide as tall, I guessed twins.
Shipped her up to my more capable mate's maternity unit last week, just in time!
View attachment 551033
As you can see she looked a bit worse for wear, after parting with two giant bull calves, so an emergency dash, down three motorways 50 odd miles, various drugs, potions, tubes and syringes and lots of post partum aggression and by late evening all look fit to survive the night...
Rinse and repeat tomorrow, but she'd better find some milk fast, as dried colostrum at sixty quid a bucket doesn't last long between two bruisers.View attachment 551036

As an aside, he's started lambing
(multiples always come first) 80 odd live lambs, 1 dead off only 27 ewes....
Phenomenal, but one helluva long and stressful day..
See what morning brings!
Where about are you?
 
Reclining, with a feckin large and well earned whisky and warm.

( In Lancashire)
Gutted . I think me and the missus would have loved a day at you farm.
Well done Sir.
Do you have a farm shop?
 
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Gutted . I think me and the missus would have loved a day at you farm.
Well done Sir.
Do you have a farm shop?
I rather think you wouldn't, (maybe in high summer if it wasn't raining)it's a right sh#t tip, feeding flatulent coos oodles of waste veggies can only result in one thing!
We've been going downhill for the last six years since my accident, my damaged head
(and everybody except Dad and Daughter#1) say the cows should be gone, my heart simply can't chop the last/best ones in...
It was bad enough selling the sheep flock.
Most cows are forth generation plus, that I've bred,k the red cow in picture, I can trace back to a heifer we bought in Lancaster Auction in 1978, her granny lived to the age of 28 and raised a calf the year before she died, she's 12yrs old, the experts will tell you they're no good after six/seven yrs. and certainly don't get a second chance after a barren year.
They've done me proud over the years ( cost me a marriage, a broken neck and many stressful nights) but without em this small farms' viability was knackered 40 years ago.
Two neighbours have set up farm shops one here, one Nr Scotch Corner, both phenominally successful, it would never have worked for me.....

I dont like people that much.

I live like a Hilbilly, but owe nobody nowt and we're lucky there's still a decent independent livestock auction system left in the North West of England, with customers to support em. The supermarkets haven't managed to b#gger up the beef and lamb trade like they've done with everything else farmers in this country produce, God knows they've tried!
Daughter's jacked a half decent modelling career to go to Ag. University this time, I think she's mad, but when she got into that lambing shed today, I thought I was going to be walking home.
Illogical madness, all of it, but I wouldn't ever (couldn'tve)swapped it for a 'proper' job, I really fear it's a luxury the next generation wont be able to afford.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
too far from us to supply goats milk,
Maybe there's an opportunity to set up an arrse trading bloc (more thought needed for the name) where products from our smallholders, woodturners, modellers and other small trades folk could be traded and delivered around the UK.
 

9.414

War Hero
....
Two neighbours have set up farm shops one here, one Nr Scotch Corner, both phenominally successful, it would never have worked for me.....

....
Is that the Organic farm shop about 2-3 miles up the A66 from Scotch Corner? That one is very good.
 
Is that the Organic farm shop about 2-3 miles up the A66 from Scotch Corner? That one is very good.
"Mainsgill Farm offer a wide range of butchery, home and gifts and countrywear." Mainsgill Farm offer a wide range of butchery, home and gifts and countrywear.

Andrew H is from the next farm to us.
He's flying up there.

My mate set up this,
( We cut his first beast up on his kitchen table for him)
"Home Page - Taylors Farm ShopTaylors Farm Shop" Taylors Farm ShopHome Page - Taylors Farm Shop

The secret to both was that both blokes married equally committed and driven partners, who were totally committed to making it work. (and has it, in spades) .

When you've got a successful and financially independent businesswoman wife(and farmers daughter) constantly pointing out your inadequacies, and telling you to jack it all in and become a house husband, it usually doesn't.

Plus I generally like cows better than people (have I mentioned that:grin:)
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
When you've got a successful and financially independent businesswoman wife(and farmers daughter) constantly pointing out your inadequacies, and telling you to jack it all in and become a house husband, it usually doesn't.
Is this in the correct thread ?
 
I rather think you wouldn't, (maybe in high summer if it wasn't raining), it's a right sh#t tip, feeding flatulent coos oodles of waste veggies can only result in one thing.
We've been going downhill for the last six years since my accident, my damaged head (and everybody except Dad and Daughter#1) say the cows should be gone, my heart simply can't chop the last/best ones in...
It was bad enough selling the sheep flock.
Most cows are forth generation plus, that I've bred, the red cow in picture, I can trace back to a heifer we bought in Lancaster Auction in 1978, her granny lived to the age of 28 and raised a calf the year before she died, she's 12yrs old, the experts will tell you they're no good after six/seven yrs. and certainly don't get a second chance after a barren year.
They've done me proud over the years (cost me a marriage, a broken neck and many stressful nights) but without em this small farms' viability was knackered 40 years ago.
Two neighbours have set up farm shops one here, one Nr Scotch Corner, both phenominally successful, it would never have worked for me.....

I don't like people that much.

I live like a Hilbilly, but owe nobody nowt and we're lucky there's still a decent independent livestock auction system left in the North West of England, with customers to support em. The supermarkets haven't managed to b#gger up the beef and lamb trade like they've done with everything else farmers in this country produce, God knows they've tried!
Daughter's jacked a half decent modelling career to go to Ag. University this time, I think she's mad, but when she got into that lambing shed today, I thought I was going to be walking home.
Illogical madness, all of it, but I wouldn't ever (couldn'tve) swapped it for a 'proper' job, I really fear it's a luxury the next generation wont be able to afford.
Not that it will mean anything to you from an anonymous member of ARRSE . . . but, my compliments to you, Sir!!

I entirely share your attitude regarding livestock, and understand the difficult "sentimental" implications.

Sometimes the "cash-flow spread-sheet", is incapable of reflecting the true worth/value of an animal, particularly one that has already contributed to your present position.

As they have "served" us, they deserve in return, a "duty-of-care" and loyalty from us.

Not sure they necessarily understand, or appreciate that, but that is not the point. It is the right thing to do.

20JUN2014 184.jpg
 
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wheel

LE
I rather think you wouldn't, (maybe in high summer if it wasn't raining)it's a right sh#t tip, feeding flatulent coos oodles of waste veggies can only result in one thing!
We've been going downhill for the last six years since my accident, my damaged head
(and everybody except Dad and Daughter#1) say the cows should be gone, my heart simply can't chop the last/best ones in...
It was bad enough selling the sheep flock.
Most cows are forth generation plus, that I've bred,k the red cow in picture, I can trace back to a heifer we bought in Lancaster Auction in 1978, her granny lived to the age of 28 and raised a calf the year before she died, she's 12yrs old, the experts will tell you they're no good after six/seven yrs. and certainly don't get a second chance after a barren year.
They've done me proud over the years ( cost me a marriage, a broken neck and many stressful nights) but without em this small farms' viability was knackered 40 years ago.
Two neighbours have set up farm shops one here, one Nr Scotch Corner, both phenominally successful, it would never have worked for me.....

I dont like people that much.

I live like a Hilbilly, but owe nobody nowt and we're lucky there's still a decent independent livestock auction system left in the North West of England, with customers to support em. The supermarkets haven't managed to b#gger up the beef and lamb trade like they've done with everything else farmers in this country produce, God knows they've tried!
Daughter's jacked a half decent modelling career to go to Ag. University this time, I think she's mad, but when she got into that lambing shed today, I thought I was going to be walking home.
Illogical madness, all of it, but I wouldn't ever (couldn'tve)swapped it for a 'proper' job, I really fear it's a luxury the next generation wont be able to afford.
You keep doing what you enjoy, the farming community needs more farmers like your good self. I often help out hinder at a friends small holding in Derbyshire. I live on the Staffordshire Cheshire border. If you ever need any help err hinderance give me a shout as I have plenty of holidays left over from last year and I am self contained in my campervan.
Word of warning I,m not strong in th arm but I am thick in th edd
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
@Humble Tiller and others. A farm local to us does this via Facebook, with pictures of the joints packed and boxed.

Might be an idea...
FB_IMG_1613844257750.jpg
 
@Humble Tiller and others. A farm local to us does this via Facebook, with pictures of the joints packed and boxed.

Might be an idea...View attachment 551235
That type of direct from the farm sale has really caught on in SW Ontario, l can’t speak for the rest of Canada, let alone the province. Buying from individual farmers where the animals are raised as animals rather than dollar signs is gradually making inroads against the corporate western feedlot bunch. Covid may be devastating economies and pocketbooks, but it has driven many to buy beef, pork, and chicken boxes locally increasing farm gate sales and helping some struggling farmers keep the lights on. The noticeable difference between the UK and Canada is it seems you’re almost paying double what we do as a 10 kg mixed beef box goes for around £65 at today’s exchange rate, l must admit l was surprised at such a gap.
 

Tyk

LE
@HLD DMR The cost of meat in the UK and Europe is a good deal higher than your side of the Atlantic, that's been true for a considerable time. Double the price is probably the lower end cost bracket (not lower quality of course).

I'm not certain why to be fair, probably a complex combination of sheer supply, NA having heaps of livestock land, regulatory overhead, taxes and god only knows what else.
 
@Humble Tiller and others. A farm local to us does this via Facebook, with pictures of the joints packed and boxed.

Might be an idea...View attachment 551235
It is certainly something we have considered. We haven't done so yet due to a number of things, most of which are excuses dressed up as reasons. What has been interesting is what people seem to want. I think, only half joking, that if we were to make every pig into sausages, and every beast into mince, we wouldn't need a freezer as we would sell out on day one.
 

Tyk

LE
It is certainly something we have considered. We haven't done so yet due to a number of things, most of which are excuses dressed up as reasons. What has been interesting is what people seem to want. I think, only half joking, that if we were to make every pig into sausages, and every beast into mince, we wouldn't need a freezer as we would sell out on day one.

That's possibly true, one factor being that a decent cut for roasting is really expensive in relative terms to mince. or sausage.

Great shame really as a good roast or steak is really nice.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
It is certainly something we have considered. We haven't done so yet due to a number of things, most of which are excuses dressed up as reasons. What has been interesting is what people seem to want. I think, only half joking, that if we were to make every pig into sausages, and every beast into mince, we wouldn't need a freezer as we would sell out on day one.
They would be very expensive sausages/mince. The expensive cuts are far too good for that and would raise the price, surely?
 

Cavuman

Swinger
Stateside, we pay $24/lb for beef tenderloin (filet mignon) and about the same for standing rib roast (my favorite!) Sirloin runs around $12/lb.; 80/20 ground beef is $6/lb. I must say that grocery store beef does not have the same taste that it did in years past. I'll bet Oops, Humble Tiller, Ravers, et al's product is toothsome and delicious. Being of Oirsh decent, I need my meat and baddadoes...

- Ed
 

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