The Falklands , with the benefit of hindsight

I thought NP8901 engaged an Argentine AMTRAC with 66mm and 84mm weapons, and sank a landing craft with the 84mm, whilst on South Georgia the Bootnecks put 66mm and 84mm rockets and a lot of small arms fire into an Argentine warship,
?
That rifle and Freddie Mercury moustaches.
Ship got a right pasting.
Royal Marine Sniper vs. Warship: Sniper Wins

Still impressed with Colour Sgt Muirs diplomatic skills ‘f*** off you spic bastards’ when invited to surrender at Government House.
 
The Argies sent a conscript Army, and didn’t expect any real response by the U.K. their is a film about the war from the Argies POV (don’t remember what it’s called but a bit of research should find it, I think ‘Blessed’ was part of the title). Mainly the film dealt with the crapness of the troop and the lack of leadership from Platoon Cpls upwards. Petty fook about seemed to be more important to the Argie Officers than digging in. Also their personal kit was crap and as much use as a chocolate fireguard. Goose Green and a hell of a lot of their personal Weps were not fit for service and many in dire need of an armourer. One prisoner was found to have 5 grenades none of which had been primed. There were more than a few of us who inwardly felt sorry for the saps even if nothing was said out loud.

Edited to add;
Blessed by Fire (Spanish: Iluminados por el fuego) (2005) I think you can buy a copy either through Amazon or EBay maybe using the US sites? The copy I saw had English sub-titles.
Very informative, I remember reading somewhere, however, that the issue of the Argentines being conscripts has often been overblown especially in the media, as in "poor wee untrained teenage Argie conscripts being made to fight professional British troops".

In fact the Argentinian military only sent men at the end of their two years' service and recalled recently discharged conscripts, in other words men in their early twenties who had done at least two years' training and who were it must be remembered led by professional NCOs and officers. The two armies were, therefore, effectively of exactly the same standard, or at least should have been if they had been properly looked after.

(Their boots were better too ;-) )
 
It was far worse than that … Nicholas Ridley , the Foreign Office minister responsible for Latin America , told a packed gathering of Falklanders with Argentines present , that if Argentina invaded , they were on their own .
That was it , straight on the 'phone to Buenos Aires " The Brits don't want to know "
The Foreign Office had been trying to get rid of the Falklands for years and the only thing stopping them was the Islanders . In 1973 , they very nearly signed a deal with Peron , but he karked it that week , and in the chaos of the guerrilla war that followed his wife Isabel's assumption , the talks stalled .
Ha ridiculous Ridley, he who commented that Open University (Student population to a man and woman over the age of 21) were indoctrinating their students with left-wing literature. Moreover in cahoots with Kieth Joseph who thought that they could manipulate Mrs. Thatcher once she was leader of the party. On account of Adolph Joseph coming out with the notion (to the Women’s Institute in Birmingham) that there were far to many children being born to working class plebs, and ruining his chances of becoming leader of the party.
 
Edited to add;
Blessed by Fire (Spanish: Iluminados por el fuego) (2005) I think you can buy a copy either through Amazon or EBay maybe using the US sites? The copy I saw had English sub-titles.
I have a copy - it is very good. They captured the cold and miserable weather and living conditions very well. The DVD also has an interview with British veterans and the film director.

It is also available on youtube (full movie with subtitles)... the sound of the guns in the distance brings back the memories...

Blessed by Fire

 
@Robme, there is no bloody way we would have been using heavy armour in the Falklands. There are the issues of sea carriage capacity before you even get there, and then the total unsuitability of heavy armour to the terrain. CVR(T) was as good as it was going to get.

As to hitching a lift, where people could they did - whether that be in the scarce rotary assets, or (variously) in trailers pulled by locals' tractors, in the Marines' BV 202s, or on the engine decks of the CVR(T)s.
I was always very grateful to the para who had "acquired" a dirt bike from somwehere and stopped and offered me a lift on the pillion from Goose Green to Darwin... :)
 
Very informative, I remember reading somewhere, however, that the issue of the Argentines being conscripts has often been overblown especially in the media, as in "poor wee untrained teenage Argie conscripts being made to fight professional British troops".

In fact the Argentinian military only sent men at the end of their two years' service and recalled recently discharged conscripts, in other words men in their early twenties who had done at least two years' training and who were it must be remembered led by professional NCOs and officers. The two armies were, therefore, effectively of exactly the same standard, or at least should have been if they had been properly looked after.

(Their boots were better too ;-) )
Argie Officers had better rations, wet weather gear, sleeping accommodations than the OR's. OR's had to forage for food by leaving their positions and were badly treated when caught. IIRC in the After the Battle book the Falklands war then and now Locals said the OR's shit everywhere and would kill all the ducks and other edibles in sight. The Argie vets also mentioned many of the Argie conscripts were formed into units while em-planing so their cohesiveness would be in serious doubt.
 
The Argies might have had a high proportion of fairly recently passed out recruits, but on the other hand there were some impressive guys on the ground certainly the ones behind the sniper rifles.
The Argy navy bottled it after the Belgrano was sunk and stayed at home, the Army were blooded in South Georgia and I think that dented their moral a wee bit. The real scary element was their air capability and the breath taking bravery of their Puccaras as they swooped down Falkland Sound, it was them and their exocets that had HmF hyperventilating.
As to routine in defence, I don't think they ever thought they would have to stay put it makes 2 weeks in Sennybridge sound like a rest camp. The exclusion zone was effectively a sodding great big cordon so sheep and sea birds become fair game. The menu in the Upland Goose was a little lean during that period as well!
The maps that someone bleated on about being crap weren't that bad. After all with the Marine presence and Major Sotheby-Taylors extensive recces over the year we knew where we were going. I have one of the tac maps which is so much better than the ones we got in some of the other theatres after all chunks of Brunei had the tag not charted so encouraging when you are planning an ambush.
 
The first failure was an intelligence failure. There were indications of potential trouble that were ignored. These included the disastrous economic situation in Argentina - dictatorships have a history of foreign adventures to distract from domestic troubles. And the Argentinian 'scrap metal dealers' that landed on South Georgia and raised the Argentinian flag two weeks before the invasion should have set off warning bells.

The Argentinian invasion was predicated on the UK not responding militarily. There was time in the two weeks to fly in a couple of Hercules loads of men and equipment (air refueled and staging through Ascension Island) plus to start a destroyer or two south and announce that a (fictional) hunter-killer submarine on patrol on the South Atlantic was now in FI waters.

The problem appears to have been mindset in both the Foreign Office and MOD - no one conceived an Argentinian invasion as possible - therefore no moves were made to deter it.

Wordsmith

(As a PS, one of my work colleagues is Argentinian. He says the economy is going to rat sh!t, they may well be going to elect the corrupt opposition party as the next government in August and he's considering moving himself and family to a neighbouring country that is better governed and with a stronger economy).
If only you'd been there to advise.
 
I think the truth is they didn't think we would come down and fight them for it. The Americans were giving them intelligence as well as some of the gucci kit we subsequently nicked off them!
The Americans were giving us intelligence and supplying us with their own gucci kit. Those HARM didn't appear from thin air, nor the 9Ls.
 
In 1981 the UK Gvmt was openly paving the way to announce that it was ceding the Falkland Islands to Argentina with the Falklanders being offered resettlement to NZ with a cash settlemt to help them.
We were not giving the Argentinians the wrong idea, they just did not believe we would fight over an ideal.
No, it wasn't.

More recently, in 1980, as a culmination of a decade of talks with Argentina, Britain again consulted the wishes of the Islanders on the basis upon which future co-operation with Argentina could be negotiated. The Islanders rejected the idea of surrendering sovereignty to Argentina in exchange for a lease-back of the administration of the Islands. However, they were prepared to agree to consultations continuing with Argentina on the basis of an agreement to freeze the dispute over sovereignty for a specified time. This proposal was put to Argentina early in 1981, but it was rejected by that State.

http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/journals/AUYrBkIntLaw/1980/2.pdf

We may have been happy to let them go but the wishes of the islanders were the deciding factor.
 
Very informative, I remember reading somewhere, however, that the issue of the Argentines being conscripts has often been overblown especially in the media, as in "poor wee untrained teenage Argie conscripts being made to fight professional British troops".

In fact the Argentinian military only sent men at the end of their two years' service and recalled recently discharged conscripts, in other words men in their early twenties who had done at least two years' training and who were it must be remembered led by professional NCOs and officers. The two armies were, therefore, effectively of exactly the same standard, or at least should have been if they had been properly looked after.

(Their boots were better too ;-) )
Not to worry, It's all part of the Official Record getting nit picked to piece's by General Arrseratti, Colonel Armchair and their civilian staff :)
 
Their macho generals didn't think a mere woman had the balls to attempt Op Corporate , and by the time they woke up and smelt the coffee , it was too late , we'd invested the place with Naval power .
In Bicheno's book it states that the ship with all the trenching stores of wire , pickets , sand bags etc could not , or more likely would not , get through
If they'd have shown a bit of common they could have had a seat at the table.

In one paper, stamped Top Secret, Thatcher is recorded as saying that under the plan being discussed by the US and at the UN, "the withdrawal of Argentine forces would have been secured without military action. Argentina would gain representation on the interim commission and on the local councils; and a commitment to negotiations to decide the definitive status of the islands by the end of the year, although without any commitment to a transfer of sovereignty." She added: "Repugnant as it was that the aggressor should gain anything from his aggression, this seemed an acceptable price to pay.

Thatcher was ready for Falkland Islands deal, National Archives papers show
 
I was always very grateful to the para who had "acquired" a dirt bike from somwehere and stopped and offered me a lift on the pillion from Goose Green to Darwin... :)
If memory serves correctly, there is a photo of said Para on the motorbike. Again, IIRC, it’s captioned ‘2Para RSM (Simpson?) with his ‘acquired’ motorbike’.
It seems you might have been in exalted company. :)
 
If it's 4RTR, the officer has them waiting at the wrong grid reference. Wolfgang will be at the correct grid reference.
Oi!, If 4RTR were delivered by 16 Tk Tptr Sqn they would have been bang on the money, where they went after that is anybody's guess.
 
Quite a number of the invasion forces were told they were going on an exercise in the Andes.
As mucho surprise as the Bennies when they found themselves in Stanley.
 
Quite a number of the invasion forces were told they were going on an exercise in the Andes.
As mucho surprise as the Bennies when they found themselves in Stanley.
We keep hearing this but the absence of BFAs and blank must have been a clue.
 
A mechanised brigade? Pfft.

All that was needed was a few old tanks.

Google The Fireflies of Port Stanley.

;)
Wikipedia says the post-WW2 operators of Sherman Fireflies included Argentina.
Is there a version in Spanish?
 
Here is another Argentina film

The Falklands War, 1982. In the heat of battle, a young British soldier, Mark, deserts his post, only to be captured by an injured Argentinean, Jose Francisco. Gradually the two men form an understanding of friendship and trust, until the arrival of a unit of British Paras, who force Mark to choose between his patriotic duty and his conscience. BAFTA Nominated film starring Gael Garcia Bernal and Kevin Knapman

 

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