The Falklands Sinkings: The Untold Story

Mrs Slocombe

Old-Salt
The torpedoing by the British of the Argentinian light cruiser General Belgrano is well known, but what of the six British ships that were sunk?
Nearly forty years after the conflict, the full story can now be told.


Podcast
 
The torpedoing by the British of the Argentinian light cruiser General Belgrano is well known, but what of the six British ships that were sunk?
Nearly forty years after the conflict, the full story can now be told.


Podcast

Morning, @Mrs Slocombe,
From the write up on the podcast.
Screenshot_20210413-082115_DuckDuckGo~2.jpg


I didn't know they used cruise missiles, or is that a generic term for the missiles used?
Screenshot_20210413-082719_DuckDuckGo.jpg
 
Morning,
I would imagine that they are referring to Exocet, as it was the first time (iirc) that it was used in action. Not that I would consider it a cruise missile.

Morning @gaijin,
I knew about the Exocets and agree with your last sentence.


E2a: Tried to give a 'like' for you reply but icons not loading for some reason.
 
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WightMivvi

War Hero
My dad’s last ship was the Coventry. Luckily, he left her (and the Navy) in 1981. I also used to work with a Chief Yeoman who had been on the bridge of the Sheffield when the exocet struck; being on duty saved him as he would have otherwise been down in the mess. A number of his friends were not so lucky. He was a decent bloke although the PTSD did make him grumpy at times.

One of my MOD jobs was in a small part of the navy that analysed weapons control and firings; every time a weapon was fired, its associated data ended up in my data archive. The Falklands data was in there, and I once got to listen to the Broadsword Ops Room recordings as the Sheffield was hit. It was all very calm and matter-of-fact; various voices reading out information and issuing commands about radars, weapons, ship speeds, directions, mentioning Sheffield was blocking them, and a rather unemotional flat announcement that Sheffield had been hit. If you didn’t realise the context, you’d imagine it was just an exercise.
 
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I had the opportunity to listen to the Control Room recordings of the Thresher sinking (declined to listen to that one) and the attack on Belgrano from Conqueror. As above, to say the conversation/orders were laid back is an understatement. It is possible to hear the machinery noises of the boat as she evades and also the implosions of Belgrano's light fittings etc - referred to as 'tinkling'.
 
My dad’s last ship was the Coventry. Luckily, he left her (and the Navy) in 1981. I also used to work with a Chief Yeoman who had been on the bridge of the Sheffield when the exocet struck; being on duty saved him as he would have otherwise been down in the mess. A number of his friends were not so lucky. He was a decent bloke although the PTSD did make him grumpy at times.

One of my MOD jobs was in a small part of the navy that analysed weapons control and firings; every time a weapon was fired, its associated data ended up in my data archive. The Falklands data was in there, and I once got to listen to the Broadsword Ops Room recordings as the Sheffield was hit. It was all very calm and matter-of-fact; various voices reading out information and issuing commands about radars, weapons, ship speeds, directions, mentioning Coventry was blocking them, and a rather unemotional flat announcement that Sheffield had been hit. If you didn’t realise the context, you’d imagine it was just an exercise.
My eldest Daughters God Mother lost her brother on Sheffield to that Exocet. He was an officer (don't know his rank) it may be why she joined the WRAC as enlisted and not commissioned. That's wild ass guess though.
 

philc

LE
Am reading the book, Belgrano being 1st, so far nothing I was not aware of, it seems to have taken all previous accounts and material and put it together to form the section.

Hopefully more detail, flesh on the story later, possibly material on the Belgrano is harder to get hold of.

I realise I may have a greater interest than the average reader though.

Will have a listen.
 
I had the opportunity to listen to the Control Room recordings of the Thresher sinking (declined to listen to that one) and the attack on Belgrano from Conqueror. As above, to say the conversation/orders were laid back is an understatement. It is possible to hear the machinery noises of the boat as she evades and also the implosions of Belgrano's light fittings etc - referred to as 'tinkling'.

In my first job after leaving the regulars I worked for a Japanese company in Telford.

The head of the production dept had been one of the officers on Conquerer. A somewhat overbearing type and not very popular with the staff.
 
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In my first job after leaving the regulars I worked for a Japanes company in Telford.

Thre head of the production dept had been one of the officers on Conquerer. A somewhat overbearing type and not very popular with the staff.
Having worked for a number of them, it is, unfortunately, a recurrent trait of that ilk.
 
//Drifting......//

A lot of you will not be aware that Captain Hart-Dyke of Coventry (when sunk) had a daughter, now known as Miranda Hart, comedienne.

//Back on track //
 
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Just waiting for the Duty Troll from Buenos Aires to tell us about the sinking of the Invincible .......
 

giatttt

War Hero
Morning, @Mrs Slocombe,
From the write up on the podcast.
View attachment 564875

I didn't know they used cruise missiles, or is that a generic term for the missiles used?
View attachment 564877
They were not simple ballistic missiles, they could navigate autonomously and maintain a height above the waves. IIRC they were able to differentiate between little boats and big boats so they would prioritise aircraft carriers or indeed boats carrying large quantities of tentage, warm clothing, and helicopters over RFA thingy boats.
 
I've heard a few Cockpit Voice Recorder audio transcripts in my time and the voices range from hysterical to flat calm, even in the face of imminent death. There was also a Falklands one, where an impatient pilot was demanding an answer from the control room of a destroyer which had suddenly stopped transmitting. The reply, delivered deadpan, was along the lines of " we'll be with you in a sec...the guy opposite has just had his head blown off" (Argentinian strafing).
 
They were not simple ballistic missiles, they could navigate autonomously and maintain a height above the waves. IIRC they were able to differentiate between little boats and big boats so they would prioritise aircraft carriers or indeed boats carrying large quantities of tentage, warm clothing, and helicopters over RFA thingy boats.
Not particularly. The AM39 did have a height controller, but very limited - if any - interim navigation (its only a 40nm weapon with 5 mins flight time) and as for target discrimination, basically looked for the largest radar return in seeker FoV and homed on that. It's efficacy was largely down to low altitude approach and relatively high speed, which meant the engagement window / response time for a force largely devoid of over the horizon warning and tracking was very limited.

Incidentally, losing "RFA thingy boats" would have shortened the war dramatically - and not in a good way for us.
 

giatttt

War Hero
Not particularly. The AM39 did have a height controller, but very limited - if any - interim navigation (its only a 40nm weapon with 5 mins flight time) and as for target discrimination, basically looked for the largest radar return in seeker FoV and homed on that. It's efficacy was largely down to low altitude approach and relatively high speed, which meant the engagement window / response time for a force largely devoid of over the horizon warning and tracking was very limited.

Incidentally, losing "RFA thingy boats" would have shortened the war dramatically - and not in a good way for us.

40NM they would have to be able to follow the curvature of the earth and not get too confused by waves, they were apparently diverted from their original target and managed to find something else, so in that respect intelligent albeit at the lollipop licking balloon chasing end of the spectrum.

Personally given the available computing power when they were designed I think they were pretty cool.
 

Mölders 1

Old-Salt
Although the Exocet Missile became the proverbial bogeyman of the Royal Navy in the Falklands War, l believe that most of the damage caused by the Argentinian Strike Aircraft was achieved by dropping "ordinary" High Explosive Bombs.
 

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