The end of gold plated policing

#1
From the Times today, a report on Theresa May's cutbacks. I must say, she gets my vote for cutting away the BS and bureaucracy that has been prevalent in the past few years:

“In scrapping the confidence target and the policing pledge, I couldn’t be any clearer about your mission: it isn’t a 30-point plan; it is to cut crime.”

http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/news/uk/article2579175.ece
 
#2
Thank God and about time too.
 

OldSnowy

LE
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#5
TopBadger said:
We had gold plated policing?
Good point. I've seen one or two police cars go along the nearby main road i the last few years, but never, ever, have I seen a copper either on foot or on a pushbike. Agreed, we're not a high crime area, but when something does happen - the occasional burglary, for example - the coppers don't seem interested anyway.

If this is Gold Plated, Go only knows what the tinplate version will be like.
 
#6
What is required is a Royal Commission to identify the role of the British police in the 21st Century. Is it purely about law enforcement or the current law enforcement / quasi social work mire that we're in at the moment?
 
#7
TopBadger said:
We had gold plated policing?
Rather telling that it was a Police Officer who said it - Sir Hugh Orde, president of the Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO).

Not that he's biased.
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
#9
Stooriefit said:
What is required is a Royal Commission to identify the role of the British police in the 21st Century. Is it purely about law enforcement or the current law enforcement / quasi social work mire that we're in at the moment?
At the cost of how many millions of pounds?
 
#10
The Police do need to discover their role, to many times have I heard that their primary concern is public safety to the point that they will prevent a law abiding citizen from going about his law abiding business. They are there to nick villains and keep the peace, they are not there to stop people doing lawful but stupid things.
 

OldSnowy

LE
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#11
Question from a confused normal taxpayer/ratepayer.

Compared to others in Europe and elsewhere, do we have an expensive Police and Justice system, or a cheap one? Do we spend more than the average? This question seemed to be one of the main drivers to increase NHS funding over th elast few years (as if throwing money at something makes it better....) so I wondered if we spend less of this, as we used to on Health?
 
#12
This morning, while walking to work, I saw the aftermath of an accident where a cyclist was hit by a car.

The offending car had been pulled off the road so it was not a traffic hazard, the injured cyclist was also moved so that he wasn't in further danger. Traffic was flowing normally past the scene.

An ambulance and two medics were dealing with the casualty, while no less than three police cars were parked nearby and at least four police were standing around/interviewing the car driver...

It's funny how the local police in Shrewsbury are never around to deal with anti-social behaviour in the evenings but there is never a shortage of them for dealing with the easy jobs during 8am - 6 pm.

I'm sure a single car and two bobbies could have dealt with this mornings accident - one to take statements and one to control traffic etc.

There's no need to cut the police - just get rid of the community supoort bods who are NOT police, and get the real policing priorities right FFS!

:x

Rodney2q
 
#13
My missus, the arch criminal, chucked her fag-end in a gutter before entering a shop. On leaving the shop she was cornered - that's cornered as in hemmed in - by 3 copper, two guys and a gal types. lectured by all three and given a £50 quid spot fine. No complaints from her about the fine but she was really really shaken up by the bullying tactics. She stands 5 foot nothing too so it's not as if they felt threatened.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#14
Ah ACPO, a public funded body that collects money from the county councils, trades and is registered as a business, its staff are paid from the public purse and yet as civil servants (allegedly) they wish to make press announcements about policy, funding and just about anything else that gets them publicity. Now where did I miss the part where a Police officer upholds the law and doesnt attempt as a paid lobbyist to get new ones introduced?
The last 20 odd years (the last 13 in particular) has seen rafts of legislation to create new ways of previously law abiding persons to become criminals without once ever tackling the issue of dealing with the proper criminals!
 
#15
In the Netherlands for last year and this year it's been around 5 billion euros to police a population of 16 million people, which is 312 euros per head.

In contrast, in the financial year 2006-2007, the UK police budget was 10.567 billion pounds for a population of about 62 million, which is 170 pounds per head , or around 200 euros.
 
#16
Useless, useless bunch of apparatchik fuckwads.

I'm surprised: one never sees any pensioner poverty in the former blackshirts of plod.

Perhaps this is because in the past government they were paid handsomely irrespective of how many times they****ed up, from events in the aftermath of 7/7 (J C de Menezes, anyone?) through to arresting an MP in the House of Commons because he had had the temerity to challenge the hegemony of the Nu Lab machine.
 
#17
As a newbie to this site and an ex member of the boys in blue I thought I'd throw my thoughts into this.

I joined the rozzers with the express view of catching the bad guys, driving like a tool and fighting legally on a Friday night... Actually, I joined to nick the bad guys and try to make some sort of difference.

What I actually found was that I spent the majority of my time being told what to do by a skipper or boss that hasn't been on the street for 10 years and is trying to fill up their own CV for further promotion.

I spent very little time actually being able to do my job and the job the public expected.

I have witnessed stupid policies (such as non-pursuit, and the reduction of specialist units eg firearms), massive wastes of money and the employment of unsuitable people compounded by government policies intended to help us do the job.

Personally I attempted to catch the bad guys and ignore the rest... I'm now no longer in the police following a pursuit where I caught the guy who had stolen a car and is now in the clink... no injuries, minor damage, conviction of a total numpty... and disciplined because my advanced driving ticket was a month out of date.

Time for a revolution and the Police to be reorganised...
 
#18
Legs said:
Stooriefit said:
What is required is a Royal Commission to identify the role of the British police in the 21st Century. Is it purely about law enforcement or the current law enforcement / quasi social work mire that we're in at the moment?
At the cost of how many millions of pounds?
Fair point, it would cost a few bob, especially if the Bloody Sunday model of squandering public cash on legal jollies was employed. But it is desperately required. I joined the police in 1984. The role then was pretty straightforward and well understood, by both the public and the police. But the last fifteen years has seen a drift from that pretty clear law enforcement role into one of community cohesion, revenue generation, diversity monitoring, 'hate' crimes and other wooly, non-defineable 'outcomes' based around social engineering. A Royal Commission needs to cut through all this crap and identify clearly and concisely what the police are for.
 
#19
stewiegriffin said:
As a newbie to this site and an ex member of the boys in blue I thought I'd throw my thoughts into this.

I joined the rozzers with the express view of catching the bad guys, driving like a tool and fighting legally on a Friday night... Actually, I joined to nick the bad guys and try to make some sort of difference.

What I actually found was that I spent the majority of my time being told what to do by a skipper or boss that hasn't been on the street for 10 years and is trying to fill up their own CV for further promotion.

I spent very little time actually being able to do my job and the job the public expected.

I have witnessed stupid policies (such as non-pursuit, and the reduction of specialist units eg firearms), massive wastes of money and the employment of unsuitable people compounded by government policies intended to help us do the job.

Personally I attempted to catch the bad guys and ignore the rest... I'm now no longer in the police following a pursuit where I caught the guy who had stolen a car and is now in the clink... no injuries, minor damage, conviction of a total numpty... and disciplined because my advanced driving ticket was a month out of date.

Time for a revolution and the Police to be reorganised...
Welcome to the site mate.

And I agree with what you said. (Ex Thames Valley)
 
#20
Cheers.

At least my thoughts seem to be echoed by the majority of people here.
 

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