The Emperor Mongs Pronouncements

Kirkz

LE
Major scientific breakthrough: when boomerangs don't come back they're sticks, and sticks are useful for other things.

'According to a statement released by Griffith University, microscopic analysis of the surface of more than 100 hardwood boomerangs held in Sydney’s Australian Museum revealed they may have been used to shape stone tools. Eva Martellotta, Michelle Langley, Adam Brumm, and Jayne Wilkins suggest that hardwood boomerangs served as multipurpose daily tools for Aboriginal people living across Australia. Most boomerangs were used for hunting and fighting, while the ones that return when thrown were often used as children’s toys, games, or as teaching tools, Martellotta added.'

Boo is Aboriginal for return because if you throw an ordinary meringue...
 
I'm not one to be critical ( cough, splutter....) but The Greater English Language and Grammar Police point out that this should be "licence".........
A good point, well made.

I am off to flagellate myself now.
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
I'm not one to be critical ( cough, splutter....) but The Greater English Language and Grammar Police point out that this should be "licence".........
Thank you. My blood pressure is slowly returning to normal.
 
Thank you. My blood pressure is slowly returning to normal.
Alright, alright!

I'll subject myself to another round of beatings! :rolleyes:
 
Major scientific breakthrough: when boomerangs don't come back they're sticks, and sticks are useful for other things.

'According to a statement released by Griffith University, microscopic analysis of the surface of more than 100 hardwood boomerangs held in Sydney’s Australian Museum revealed they may have been used to shape stone tools. Eva Martellotta, Michelle Langley, Adam Brumm, and Jayne Wilkins suggest that hardwood boomerangs served as multipurpose daily tools for Aboriginal people living across Australia. Most boomerangs were used for hunting and fighting, while the ones that return when thrown were often used as children’s toys, games, or as teaching tools, Martellotta added.'

Well I never.

I'd always thought that stone was harder than wood, so shaping stone with a bit of wood seems like magic.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Well I never.

I'd always thought that stone was harder than wood, so shaping stone with a bit of wood seems like magic.

Flint knapping with deer antler has been long known about.

Wood is easier to find than antler!
 
Well I never.

I'd always thought that stone was harder than wood, so shaping stone with a bit of wood seems like magic.
Depends which stone and which wood. Trying to work granite with a bit of balsa is never going to go well. Plus Aussie wood will have been baked in the outback for decades, must be like rock by the time it gets used.
 
Depends which stone and which wood. Trying to work granite with a bit of balsa is never going to go well. Plus Aussie wood will have been baked in the outback for decades, must be like rock by the time it gets used.
Also probably poisonous or otherwise lethal. Like most of the rest of the place.
 
Also probably poisonous or otherwise lethal. Like most of the rest of the place.
There was a good bit in one of the Discworld books when Death asks for a list of anything dangerous in the Disc's equivalent of Australia. After being buried in an avalanche of books he then asks for a list of anything not dangerous and gets the response "Some of the sheep".
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
There was a good bit in one of the Discworld books when Death asks for a list of anything dangerous in the Disc's equivalent of Australia. After being buried in an avalanche of books he then asks for a list of anything not dangerous and gets the response "Some of the sheep".
4ecks as any fule kno
 
Oook
 
Particularly in Australia, where until their introduction in the 19th C, there were no deer.
Go to Tasmania now, you can find antler everywhere. Deer are in plague proportion at the moment.

It's amazing how few people have completely buggered up the Australian ecosystem. Thomas Austin and Reginald Mungomery to name a few.
 

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