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The Emperor Mongs Pronouncements

Oh, everyone thinks they have backups... It's the ability to successfully restore from them that shows who the winners are...
Which is why disaster recovery exercises really should be part of someone's job description.

The Deputy Director of Diversity and Outreach Programmes could pick it up surely?
 
Oh, everyone thinks they have backups... It's the ability to successfully restore from them that shows who the winners are...
They never backup their local drives for some reason or if they do they never check the backups. Bane of my life.
Inexcusable if it’s their server and they always phone our support line to blame us despite the fact that we made it clear in their software support agreement and when we install the software that they are responsible for all backups etc.
I think we should hit them over the head with a manual just to reinforce the point.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
Oh, everyone thinks they have backups... It's the ability to successfully restore from them that shows who the winners are...
I've told before about my time in Officers' Record Of Service group in Manning, RAPC Computer Centre.

One of the senior programmers, let's call him Terry (for that was his name) specialised in scrutinies. Ad hoc programs that ran against the ROS (often at the behest of Parliamentary questions). Often mundane. How many officers in NI with a quarter in BAOR? Or literally anything.

He also ran "Corrective Scrutinies". Using his basic code, it was possible to correct errors on the ROS. And if the format of the ROS were changed for any reason, to update the entire Officers' ROS Master file. (No database in those days. During the day the current ROS master was loaded into a VSAM file (forerunner of DB2) so that during the day, inputs by RPO could be made. These were all rolled forward onto that night's ROS update run.) No problems. Terry was a good worker and very good at it.

Until I had cause to look at the ROS log file from a few days ago. A corrective had been run in the meantime and my update wouldn't work.

I had a lightbulb moment. I turned to Terry. "How many correctives have you run in all the years you've been here?"

"Hundreds."

"How many log files (master backups) have we got in the Guard Room store?"

"Hundreds and hundreds."

"Have you ever applied your correctives to the log files?"

"Fúck."

At this point I moved to Job Control Group in Ops. I saw an awful lot of corrective scrutinies being run throughout my time in JCG right up until I got out.
 
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theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
Which is why disaster recovery exercises really should be part of someone's job description.

The Deputy Director of Diversity and Outreach Programmes could pick it up surely?


Just before covid hit I was dragged into the disaster recovery committee at work.
I was asked for my evaluation of the disaster recovery plan. My response of 'remove the words recovery and plan' and it's a better description didn't go down well.
we discussed the possibility of working from home should, for some unknown reason, we were unable to work from the office. (we were thinking flood, fire, structural damage)
"This is a simple thing to test, one person from each department could try it out for a single day" says I.
"No, it'll never ever be needed" declared our head of IT and support

two weeks later and I'm the only one able to work from home without any issues.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Just before covid hit I was dragged into the disaster recovery committee at work.
I was asked for my evaluation of the disaster recovery plan. My response of 'remove the words recovery and plan' and it's a better description didn't go down well.
we discussed the possibility of working from home should, for some unknown reason, we were unable to work from the office. (we were thinking flood, fire, structural damage)
"This is a simple thing to test, one person from each department could try it out for a single day" says I.
"No, it'll never ever be needed" declared our head of IT and support

two weeks later and I'm the only one able to work from home without any issues.


I am still unable to work from home, even to access emails.

The work laptop is over 10 years old and can not run the various programmes required to access the Intranet remotely. That was reported last April.

I could try to access emails on my own laptop but we have a double log in, where we are sent a code.

However the work mobile stopped working beginning of November and am still waiting a replacement.

The code is sent to the work mobile.
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
I am still unable to work from home, even to access emails.

The work laptop is over 10 years old and can not run the various programmes required to access the Intranet remotely. That was reported last April.

I could try to access emails on my own laptop but we have a double log in, where we are sent a code.

However the work mobile stopped working beginning of November and am still waiting a replacement.

The code is sent to the work mobile.


I converted the garden bar into an office space, built my own desk to fit into the space available, turned an old laptop screen into a monitor, and made a "temporary" monitor stand (which I've just replaced with a proper one) for a non vesa monitor (there was a certain amount of dismantling the monitor and then drilling holes in the casing)
wired in the broadband, added carpet, lined the walls inside, put up lights, smoke alarm and I may have taken the piss a little but putting up emergency exit and no smoking signs,
full risk assessments (normal, fire, first aid and DSE) which is more than we've got in the office normally.

I can run the consultancy and training sessions online via teams, it's fuckin' ace
 
Used to dial in to my works PC from home whilst on lockdown usually to find that management had switched it off to cut down the leccy bill.

ETA Changed furlough to lockdown as furlough came later, followed by redundancy
 
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I am still unable to work from home, even to access emails.

The work laptop is over 10 years old and can not run the various programmes required to access the Intranet remotely. That was reported last April.

I could try to access emails on my own laptop but we have a double log in, where we are sent a code.

However the work mobile stopped working beginning of November and am still waiting a replacement.

The code is sent to the work mobile.
Are you employed by gunmint or private sector?
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
I work in government IT.

I was locked down on my birthday (took the day off, brought nothing home but my laptop and charger).

Haven't missed a beat.

Hugely missing the banter . . .

I wasn't in the office much anyway, usually out at client sites, I've kept in touch with the three people I care to keep in touch with via text, email and mostly teams - just like before.
I do have a several people who now want help (if it wasn't for the lockdown) improve their home office space.

Which reminds me, I need to make a couple of long ethernet cables up, I may have accidentally brought home 200m of cat5 cable from work, I've used cat 7 for my own stuff, which gives me just over 500mb broadband in the 'sheffice'
 
I am still unable to work from home, even to access emails.

The work laptop is over 10 years old and can not run the various programmes required to access the Intranet remotely. That was reported last April.

I could try to access emails on my own laptop but we have a double log in, where we are sent a code.

However the work mobile stopped working beginning of November and am still waiting a replacement.

The code is sent to the work mobile.
My MODNET desktop is over 10 years old, and obviously is completely inadequate, better off at home with my laptop, but I can do little more than J1 from home.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Are you employed by gunmint or private sector?

Public Dental Service.

Us Senior Dental Officers get sod all in way of IT.


Oral Health Educators, on a different budget, all have very modern laptops and smartphones. In order to teach kids to brush teeth. Which they can not do at present.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
Used to dial in to my works PC from home whilst on lockdown usually to find that management had switched it off to cut down the leccy bill.

ETA Changed furlough to lockdown as furlough came later, followed by redundancy
Oh the joy of trying to run regular backups, push out software etc during block leave! Despite notices, emails and phone calls saying this would happen, leave power on, instructors were still ordered by their Adj/RSM/local bean counters to switch everything off to save electricity.

The cost of not being able to work for two or three days whilst everything caught up, obviously came from another budget!
 
Oh the joy of trying to run regular backups, push out software etc during block leave! Despite notices, emails and phone calls saying this would happen, leave power on, instructors were still ordered by their Adj/RSM/local bean counters to switch everything off to save electricity.

The cost of not being able to work for two or three days whilst everything caught up, obviously came from another budget!
And it’s all your fault of course despite all the emails, phone calls and paper notices stuck to the screen. Flashbacks, shudder.
 
I converted the garden bar into an office space, built my own desk to fit into the space available, turned an old laptop screen into a monitor, and made a "temporary" monitor stand (which I've just replaced with a proper one) for a non vesa monitor (there was a certain amount of dismantling the monitor and then drilling holes in the casing)
wired in the broadband, added carpet, lined the walls inside, put up lights, smoke alarm and I may have taken the piss a little but putting up emergency exit and no smoking signs,
full risk assessments (normal, fire, first aid and DSE) which is more than we've got in the office normally.

I can run the consultancy and training sessions online via teams, it's fuckin' ace

Hope you’ve had your works H&S department round to check it. Lady next door has worked from home for ages, when her company H&S did just that the chappy told her he’d bring her some cup lids, because if she made a hot drink on work time, company policy was that she must have a lid on it while moving around, ie from kitchen back to office.

In his defence she did say he looked awfully embarrassed having to say it.
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
I am still unable to work from home, even to access emails.

The work laptop is over 10 years old and can not run the various programmes required to access the Intranet remotely. That was reported last April.

I could try to access emails on my own laptop but we have a double log in, where we are sent a code.

However the work mobile stopped working beginning of November and am still waiting a replacement.

The code is sent to the work mobile.
Sounds like your Better Half has slipped your IT bods a few shekels to ensure you have to go into work and not stay at home! ;).
 
When I heard it on the radio this morning my first thought was, "Don't they have a back-up protocol, including to a separate location?"

Oh, wait - public sector IT...
Heard this one at a safety confewrence a few years ago. The Police National Computer (PNC) is hosted at two seperate sites, one is at Hendon and back in 2005 there was a single backup site at a nice little place in Hertfordshire called Buncefield.

The big fire at Buncefield may or may not have impact the backup site, which was placed there because it was assessed as being a low risk area, but from what I heard the fire resulted in the site being taken down for a while for "maintenance".

There was still the main site at Hendon though..... which was right next to another major fire in 2006....!
 
Hope you’ve had your works H&S department round to check it. Lady next door has worked from home for ages, when her company H&S did just that the chappy told her he’d bring her some cup lids, because if she made a hot drink on work time, company policy was that she must have a lid on it while moving around, ie from kitchen back to office.

In his defence she did say he looked awfully embarrassed having to say it.
One of our local government offices has banned all hot food and drink from the office in case someone spilt it and scalded themselves, which meant production dropped as everyone had to nip out of the office everytime they wanted a breew.
 

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