The Douglas Bader Spirit Lives On....but should it?

On the tarmac just before the donk jockeys board the plane. There's only one incident of this kind been reported AFAIK, but loads of incidents involving pissed pilots, so make em walk the line!
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
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And dispite disability and incident with arm becoming detached, he still landed plane safely, so obviously was fit to fly.
 
And dispite disability and incident with arm becoming detached, he still landed plane safely, so obviously was fit to fly.

But was that luck or good management. The Herald of Free Enterprise regularly sailed with the car deck doors open. They only got unlucky once.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Anyway, has anybody told Dinger about this exciting new job opportunity open up to him?
 
From a straightforward risk-management point of view, I'd have thought that in an emergency situation the pilot's options could be limited because of this piece of equipment in place of his arm, thereby increasing the risk to the aircraft and passengers. Sounds very odd to me.
 
From a straightforward risk-management point of view, I'd have thought that in an emergency situation the pilot's options could be limited because of this piece of equipment in place of his arm, thereby increasing the risk to the aircraft and passengers. Sounds very odd to me.
Of course the risk is mitigated somewhat by having a co-pilot aboard.
 
Flybe say they have put additional safety checks in place to prevent this particular incident from happening again.
There will be many critical operations which might be adversely affected by the sudden loss of a prosthetic limb and thus operator control......perhaps it would be wiser for there to be a rule that where a pilot and co-pilot have to be present to execute a procedure, then the able-bodied crewman undertakes that operation rather than try to imagine the effect of a repeat of this incident in every conceivable scenario and adopt a new set of checks and balances to militate.
There is no reason why, in commercial aviation, the pilot, co-pilot or the flight/coms engineer could not be the ranking officer depending on seniority and experience.
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
Sounds pretty armless to me!












Taxi!
 
Flybe say they have put additional safety checks in place to prevent this particular incident from happening again.
There will be many critical operations which might be adversely affected by the sudden loss of a prosthetic limb and thus operator control......perhaps it would be wiser for there to be a rule that where a pilot and co-pilot have to be present to execute a procedure, then the able-bodied crewman undertakes that operation rather than try to imagine the effect of a repeat of this incident in every conceivable scenario and adopt a new set of checks and balances to militate.
There is no reason why, in commercial aviation, the pilot, co-pilot or the flight/coms engineer could not be the ranking officer depending on seniority and experience.
Alternatively, we could let the specialists at the various regulatory authorities do their job.
 
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Reminds me of a Thalmidamide lad I knew (sadly not now with us) learning to drive. He asked me to test him on the hand signals.
 

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