The Curry thread

Hohenidoom

Old-Salt
I've been poking through a very worn copy of an early Madhur Jaffery book this evening - illustrations in b&w and those wonderful brown pages.

Some interesting points on curry in there. A favourite is a recipe for Hyderabadi Biryani (best made with goat).

Surprisingly Keith Floyd, that swashbuckling old devil, has a really good book on Indian cuisine too.
 
The first offence for a lot of us, I think. And the chow mein....
 
I cook curry everyday so instead of using little jars for the spices, which can be infuriating, I use a masala dabba to store them.

Thats a lot of money for what is £8.00 worth of spices and a £3.00 tin.
 
Thats a lot of money for what is £8.00 worth of spices and a £3.00 tin.

Alternatively, you can make your own spice mix and keep it in a jar.

There are two schools of thought about the use of spices; using pre-mixed blend or to individually add the spices in the tempering process. The purist Brahmin, vegan cooking (which incidentally don't use garlic or onion) add the spices one after another to the hot oil in a particular order.

Spices need to be fried in oil to release their qualities. Heat the oil on high and once its at the right temperature, reduce the heat to medium for a few seconds before adding them.

I'm currently experimenting with pre-mixed spices from Bart who have different recipes from different parts of India, i.e. Bengali, Punjabi, etc.

Creating magic together
 

Serpico

War Hero
Alternatively, you can make your own spice mix and keep it in a jar.

There are two schools of thought about the use of spices; using pre-mixed blend or to individually add the spices in the tempering process. The purist Brahmin, vegan cooking (which incidentally don't use garlic or onion) add the spices one after another to the hot oil in a particular order.

Spices need to be fried in oil to release their qualities. Heat the oil on high and once its at the right temperature, reduce the heat to medium for a few seconds before adding them.

I'm currently experimenting with pre-mixed spices from Bart who have different recipes from different parts of India, i.e. Bengali, Punjabi, etc.

Creating magic together

Sorry, but I stopped reading after vegan. Sadly my eyes caught the "doesn't use garlic or onion" and I sh*t myself in pure rage. Now burning my house down for full effect
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
Some genuinely different & interesting recipes here (not all curry, but all vegan! This may, or may not, suit...)
Vegan you say, hmm I thought quite highly of you as well.
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
Oi, after having six pints of French blood pumped into me within thirty minutes, and surviving.
Death would have been kinder.
 
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You don't need a recipe if you have a jar of this stuff, easily the best Green Thai Curry paste I've had :-

curry paste.jpg
 
Alternatively, you can make your own spice mix and keep it in a jar.

There are two schools of thought about the use of spices; using pre-mixed blend or to individually add the spices in the tempering process. The purist Brahmin, vegan cooking (which incidentally don't use garlic or onion) add the spices one after another to the hot oil in a particular order.

Spices need to be fried in oil to release their qualities. Heat the oil on high and once its at the right temperature, reduce the heat to medium for a few seconds before adding them.

I'm currently experimenting with pre-mixed spices from Bart who have different recipes from different parts of India, i.e. Bengali, Punjabi, etc.

Creating magic together
Used a book called indian in 7 spices ( bit untrue as everyone involed garlic and ginger paste) worked well fed 8 blokes for supper all in for £34, cannot understand other shifts that end up spunking £80+ 0n takeaway
 
Really, a spicy marinade etc could include WI jerk seasoning, and it really suits me when I fancy something with heat, because it's very easy to cook for one, the best curries really need at least 4- 8 pax, purely because of the quantities of various spices, veg, meat involved.


That's my favourite, although if you have kids or people who don't like chili, try to get a Bajan version.......

The Dunns River paste looks very thin, but DON'T be fooled, a very thin smear is more than enough.

I usually use it with pork chops, or belly strips, but have recently smeared it on cod, dipped in flour, then shallow fried in butter....... lovely.
 

Some time ago, I bought a kilo bucket of this for about a quid in B&M.......

Started off as a curry for two, but it was so bloody hot, it ended up as a curry for eight, before it was watered down enough, with extra bland ingredients.

Gorgeous stuff, but really wierd........... crazy hot, made your nose and eyes stream, but you could taste all the ingredients, through the chili, which doesn't happen with say. a Vindaloo
 

endure

GCM

Some time ago, I bought a kilo bucket of this for about a quid in B&M.......

Started off as a curry for two, but it was so bloody hot, it ended up as a curry for eight, before it was watered down enough, with extra bland ingredients.

Gorgeous stuff, but really wierd........... crazy hot, made your nose and eyes stream, but you could taste all the ingredients, through the chili, which doesn't happen with say. a Vindaloo
Most Thai curries are like that. The heat doesn't overpower the taste. I've got a Thai mate who eats mouse shit chillies the way we eat peanuts.
 
Sorry, but I stopped reading after vegan. Sadly my eyes caught the "doesn't use garlic or onion" and I sh*t myself in pure rage. Now burning my house down for full effect

In ancient Indian Ayurvedic medicine (which is still being taught in Indian universities), they do not recommend eating garlic and onions because they have a negative effect on the person. There is apparently a study in the West showing garlic disrupts the synchrony of the brain. Don't know much about this study but here's a link:

https://www.elephantjournal.com/2010/09/the-science-why-garlic-is-a-brain-toxin/

I personally follow Ayurvedic principles when cooking as much as I can, i.e. I eat spices and foods that are suitable to my Dosha (metabolic type). All spices have medicinal qualities according to Ayurveda and I find I have more energy when I eat the right foods for me.
 

Hohenidoom

Old-Salt
A bit off topic, but speaking of really hot stuff there's a great biltong shop in Grantham. Tried some ghost chilli stuff and was fantastic - fellow behind the counter (I think perhaps as a punishment for my non-yokel accent) ended up persuading me some made with Carolina Reapers was also fairly nice.

One chilly evening in Swaffham later I had a taste, and I'm fairly sure I left most of my tongue over the dashboard of my Land Rover. I assume the rest of the packet burned through my webbing and on toward the centre of the earth.
 
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