The contrast between Eastern and Western religions

#1
This is something I find very interesting indeed.

It would appear from my amateur but extensive research efforts that the Western religions (Christianity, Judaism and Islam) largely concentrated their efforts to subjugate folks on the premise that sex and sexuality were somehow “dirty” and “debased” and as such to be forbidden, except under very special circumstances that they exclusively dictated and changed as they saw fit.

In contrast, the Eastern religions (Buddhism, Jainism, Hinduism etc) accepted and embraced sex and sexuality as a basic and essential element of the human condition and rejoiced in it. It was only much later in the development of these Eastern religions that they became "infected" with the perverted and hostile "Christian" views and began altering their attitudes.

I’d be interested in other views on this.

MsG
 
#2
The Pre- Christian religions in the West didn't have a problem with sex... see the Druids & Beltane etc.


Maybe it's because the "big 3" originated in the hotter regions where there was little water, so no washing after - made things smell a bit "fishy", so they decided it was dirty?! Oh well, only a thought! :oops:
 
#3
Hmmm, I'm more interested to find out why certain elements from Western culture and religion seemed to have rubbed off on indigenous people in far away countries and others haven't.

Why did the "get your f*cking act together" failed to penetrate their culture and mentality? Or the "sort you garbage problem out to increase better living standards" attitude? Or the "work your arrse off to find out tell tale signs about possibly going to heaven" belief?

They all seem to be very selective about the influences foreign interaction should have on their cultures and religions.
 
#4
Quick Reply:
As far as I understand it the Jewish religion still embraces the idea that sex is healthy and families are enjoined to participate. The problem comes that on certain days or times the woman is classed as unclean depending on the cycle, i.e so many days after menstruation. This certainly used to be the case, I don't really know how modernity has affected that.

Early Christianity reflected that ideal also as Jesus was Jewish, and in fact is on occasion described as Rabbi. Early Christianity is markedly different from the modern version and its world view was much more in line with pagan thought, which treats sex as part of a healthy loving process.
The concept of sex as grubby came at a later date after thinkers such as Augustine saw that a personal retreat from the physical realities would be a personal benefit. (I will have to check this one) Then the (politicised) Catholic church realised that a certain level of control could be established by saying that sex should only be in marriage in order to control via the confessional. Also by applying the concept of original sin, which is a later idea then women could be relegated from the essentially equal role they had in the early days.
In short sex as political control and assuring that a mysoginist church structure would be maintained.

Other religions, as did our ancestors see sex as forming part of the creative process and is a way of experiencing a deeper form of love if your partner is your life-partner.
The modern abrahamic religions are in fact an anomaly, and I believe that history will see them as such.

For a healthy attitude to it all try googling Tantra and Tantric sex, will try to provide a link later.
 
#5
Also Bugsy, as a quick look at the lives of the popes will show, an aversion to sex is actually a rather recent phenomenon in Catholicism.

In fact, its locus is Ireland, where Jansenist Catholic puritanism was disseminated across the country from Maynooth from the mid-19th C on...
 
#6
Bugsy, in your extensive research you have certainly come across this:

Jewish Attitudes Towards Sexuality

In Jewish law, sex is not considered shameful, sinful or obscene. Sex is not thought of as a necessary evil for the sole purpose of procreation. Although sexual desire comes from the yetzer ra (the evil impulse), it is no more evil than hunger or thirst, which also come from the yetzer ra. Like hunger, thirst or other basic instincts, sexual desire must be controlled and channeled, satisfied at the proper time, place and manner. But when sexual desire is satisfied between a husband and wife at the proper time, out of mutual love and desire, sex is a mitzvah.

Sex is permissible only within the context of a marriage. In Judaism, sex is not merely a way of experiencing physical pleasure. It is an act of immense significance, which requires commitment and responsibility. The requirement of marriage before sex ensures that sense of commitment and responsibility. Jewish law also forbids sexual contact short of intercourse outside of the context of marriage, recognizing that such contact will inevitably lead to intercourse.

The primary purpose of sex is to reinforce the loving marital bond between husband and wife. The first and foremost purpose of marriage is companionship, and sexual relations play an important role. Procreation is also a reason for sex, but it is not the only reason. Sex between husband and wife is permitted (even recommended) at times when conception is impossible, such as when the woman is pregnant, after menopause, or when the woman is using a permissible form of contraception.

In the Torah, the word used for sex between husband and wife comes from the root Yod-Dalet-Ayin, meaning "to know," which vividly illustrates that proper Jewish sexuality involves both the heart and mind, not merely the body.

Nevertheless, Judaism does not ignore the physical component of sexuality. The need for physical compatibility between husband and wife is recognized in Jewish law. A Jewish couple must meet at least once before the marriage, and if either prospective spouse finds the other physically repulsive, the marriage is forbidden.

Sex should only be experienced in a time of joy. Sex for selfish personal satisfaction, without regard for the partner's pleasure, is wrong and evil. A man may never force his wife to have sex. A couple may not have sexual relations while drunk or quarreling. Sex may never be used as a weapon against a spouse, either by depriving the spouse of sex or by compelling it. It is a serious offense to use sex (or lack thereof) to punish or manipulate a spouse.

Sex is the woman's right, not the man's. A man has a duty to give his wife sex regularly and to ensure that sex is pleasurable for her. He is also obligated to watch for signs that his wife wants sex, and to offer it to her without her asking for it. The woman's right to sexual intercourse is referred to as onah, and it is one of a wife's three basic rights (the others are food and clothing), which a husband may not reduce. The Talmud specifies both the quantity and quality of sex that a man must give his wife. It specifies the frequency of sexual obligation based on the husband's occupation, although this obligation can be modified in the ketubah (marriage contract). A man may not take a vow to abstain from sex for an extended period of time, and may not take a journey for an extended period of time, because that would deprive his wife of sexual relations. In addition, a husband's consistent refusal to engage in sexual relations is grounds for compelling a man to divorce his wife, even if the couple has already fulfilled the halakhic obligation to procreate.

Although sex is the woman's right, she does not have absolute discretion to withhold it from her husband. A woman may not withhold sex from her husband as a form of punishment, and if she does, the husband may divorce her without paying the substantial divorce settlement provided for in the ketubah.

Although some sources take a more narrow view, the general view of halakhah is that any sexual act that does not involve sh'chatat zerah (destruction of seed, that is, ejaculation outside the vagina) is permissible. As one passage in the Talmud states, "a man may do whatever he pleases with his wife." (Nedarim 20b) In fact, there are passages in the Talmud that encourage foreplay to arouse the woman. (Nedarim 20a). Any stories you may have heard about Jewish sex occurring through a hole in a sheet are purely an urban legend.

http://www.jewfaq.org/sex.htm
 
#7
Another perspective is that Western societies are individualist with religions providing a focus for collective thought and activity, whereas Eastern societies tend to be collectivist with religions providing emotional space for the individual. Perhaps this is where sex enters (fnarr) the Eastern religious field?
 
#8
Song of Solomon - the sex book in the bible? 8)

Jesus used the metaphor of 'marriage' throughout his ministry 'the bride (church) and the groom (him)'; Jesus' mission was 'relationship'... but faithful relationships... but top bonking was in the design brief of the creator - that equipment didn't just happen you know :wink:

Dwarf is bang on re the religionisationism of Christianity... :D
 
#9
Surely Christianity, Judaism and Islam are eastern religions (Ok middle east maybe) they just happen to have taken off in more places that the places where they originated.
 
#10
Ulster_Rifleman said:
Surely Christianity, Judaism and Islam are eastern religions (Ok middle east maybe) they just happen to have taken off in more places that the places where they originated.
Speaking of Eastern "religions":

October 2, 2008

The stunning growth of Christianity in China
by
The Economist

ZHAO XIAO, a former Communist Party official and convert to Christianity, smiles over a cup of tea and says he thinks there are up to 130m Christians in China. This is far larger than previous estimates. The government says there are 21m (16m Protestants, 5m Catholics). Unofficial figures, such as one given by the Centre for the Study of Global Christianity in Massachusetts, put the number at about 70m. But Mr Zhao is not alone in his reckoning. A study of China by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life, an American think-tank, says indirect survey evidence suggests many unaffiliated Christians are not in the official figures. And according to China Aid Association (CAA), a Texas-based lobby group, the director of the government body which supervises all religions in China said privately that the figure was indeed as much as 130m in early 2008.

If so, it would mean China contains more Christians than Communists (party membership is 74m) and there may be more active Christians in China than in any other country. In 1949, when the Communists took power, less than 1% of the population had been baptised, most of them Catholics. Now the largest, fastest-growing number of Christians belong to Protestant "house churches".

In a suburb of Shanghai, off Haining Road, neighbours peer warily across the hallway as visitors file into a living room, bringing the number to 25, the maximum gathering allowed by law without official permission. Inside, young urban professionals sit on sofas and folding chairs. A young woman in a Che Guevara T-shirt blesses the group and a man projects material downloaded from the internet from his laptop onto the wall. Heads turn towards the display and sing along: "Glory, Glory Glory; Holy, Holy, Holy; God is near to each one of us." It is Sunday morning, and worship is beginning in one of thousands of house churches across China.

House churches are small congregations who meet privately--usually in apartments--to worship away from the gaze of the Communist Party. In the 1950s, the Catholic and main Protestant churches were turned into branches of the religious-affairs administration. House churches have an unclear status, neither banned nor fully approved of. As long as they avoid neighbourly confrontation and keep their congregations below a certain size (usually about 25), the Protestant ones are mostly tolerated, grudgingly. Catholic ones are kept under closer scrutiny, reflecting China's tense relationship with the Vatican.
 
#11
Bugsy said:
This is something I find very interesting indeed.

It would appear from my amateur but extensive research efforts that the Western religions (Christianity, Judaism and Islam) largely concentrated their efforts to subjugate folks on the premise that sex and sexuality were somehow “dirty” and “debased” and as such to be forbidden, except under very special circumstances that they exclusively dictated and changed as they saw fit.

In contrast, the Eastern religions (Buddhism, Jainism, Hinduism etc) accepted and embraced sex and sexuality as a basic and essential element of the human condition and rejoiced in it. It was only much later in the development of these Eastern religions that they became "infected" with the perverted and hostile "Christian" views and began altering their attitudes.

I’d be interested in other views on this.

MsG
All three of the monotheistic religions have far more to say about wealth and the treatment of the vulnerable than they do about sex. An awful lot of the sex stuff (in Christianity at least) came with some of the church fathers in the 3rd and 4th century. They seem from their writings to have had "issues" about girls, similar to the other two monotheisms. The discussions fo wealth were largely overlooked as the church became wealthy.
 
#12
Found the links from another thread.
Try looking at these and thinking sex is unhealthy.




You MUST get your lass to watch the first video, but only after you have watched the second.
Tantric approach to massaging the male genitals
video.google.co.uk/vid...&resnum=4#


massaging the female genitals
video.google.co.uk/vid...&resnum=4#
 
#13
Ascribing any sort of credibility to a belief in pixies of whatever colour or origin is asinine.
I'd be happy to fuck an elf, though.
 

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