The combat statistics for all the aircraft currently in use

#1
The combat statistics for all the aircraft currently in use | MiGFlug.com Blog

Combat statistics for all fighter aircraft in use


The Format is:
[Name of aircraft] Air-to-air kills – Air-to-air losses – Losses to ground fire

[Name of conflict aircraft was used in]


[Nation that used aircraft in said conflict]


Air-to-air kills – Air-to-air losses – Losses to ground fire

For some reason the jpeg of the relevant stats will not upload here.
 
#2
The combat statistics for all the aircraft currently in use | MiGFlug.com Blog

Combat statistics for all fighter aircraft in use


The Format is:
[Name of aircraft] Air-to-air kills – Air-to-air losses – Losses to ground fire
[Name of conflict aircraft was used in]



[Nation that used aircraft in said conflict]


Air-to-air kills – Air-to-air losses – Losses to ground fire

For some reason the jpeg of the relevant stats will not upload here.
By far the F-15 is the best and most prolific fighter.

The Tornado ADV didn't give much value for money.
 
#3
By far the F-15 is the best and most prolific fighter.

The Tornado ADV didn't give much value for money.
Neither does Rafale by that logic.

I didn't know USSR Mig 21's had 6 kills in Vietnam?
 
#4
The unbeaten (aircraft that have engaged in significant air combat but never been shot down in air-to-air combat): F-15 Eagle, Sea Harrier, Su-27. ..
 
#5
For some reason the jpeg of the relevant stats will not upload here.
A simple Copy and Paste image needs to be around 799 x 640 or 640 x 799 (ish), saved images can be somewhat larger and inserted into your post by using the 'insert image' icon as you are writing a new post, either way if the image tries to load but you get an error they are usually too large so try resizing them and try again. If you need advice on how to resize just ask away.
 
#6
Neither does Rafale by that logic.

I didn't know USSR Mig 21's had 6 kills in Vietnam?
Rafale is still midlife compared to the ADV which has been and gone, unless it sees some action it will end up like the Tornado in the AA role. Mind you the Mirage 2000 has led a quiet life in the AA sphere.

I didn't realise an F-18 had been lost in AA combat.
 
#7
 
#8
The combat statistics for all the aircraft currently in use | MiGFlug.com Blog

Combat statistics for all fighter aircraft in use


The Format is:
[Name of aircraft] Air-to-air kills – Air-to-air losses – Losses to ground fire
[Name of conflict aircraft was used in]



[Nation that used aircraft in said conflict]


Air-to-air kills – Air-to-air losses – Losses to ground fire

For some reason the jpeg of the relevant stats will not upload here.
Copy this link into the 'Insert Image' link:
https://migflug.com/jetflights/wp-c...Air-to-air-losses-–-Losses-to-ground-fire.png
 
#9
By far the F-15 is the best and most prolific fighter.

The Tornado ADV didn't give much value for money.
The Tornado was never intended to be a true fighter - it was used for low level aerial denial ops aganst enemy airfields in Op Granby / Desert Storm. At its inception it was touted as MRCA Multi Role Combat Aircraft. Had it been utilised in a NATO - Warsaw Pact conflict it would have been tasked with shooting down Sov bombers coming down down from bases near Murmansk to launch cruise missiles or if possible to bomb.
 
#11
Rafale is still midlife compared to the ADV which has been and gone, unless it sees some action it will end up like the Tornado in the AA role. Mind you the Mirage 2000 has led a quiet life in the AA sphere.

I didn't realise an F-18 had been lost in AA combat.
USN Official history:

17 JAN 91 • At 0130, an (apparent) Iraqi surface-to-air missile shot down Lt. Cmdr. Michael S. Speicher in an F/A-18C Hornet, BuNo 163484, of VFA-81 embarked on board Saratoga (CV 60), during a night strike over Iraq. Speicher thus became the first American casualty of the Persian Gulf War. Additional information subsequently suggested his possible survival, and on 11 January 2001, Secretary of the Navy Richard J. Danzig changed the pilot’s status from killed in action/body not recovered to missing in action. On 11 October 2002, Secretary of the Navy Gordon R. England issued a memorandum that further changed the pilot’s status to missing/captured. In July 2009, Iraqi Bedouins directed a recovery team from Multi-National Force–West to a crash site in the desert 62 miles west of Ramadi in Anbar province. The team recovered remains later confirmed as those of Speicher.

Another version:

On the first night of the war, two F/A-18s from the carrier USS Saratoga were flying outside of Baghdad when two Iraqi MiG-25PDs interceptors from the 96th Squadron engaged them. In the beyond-visual-range (BVR), one of the Iraqi MiGs, piloted by Lieutenant Colonel Zuhair Dawood, fired an R-40 missile, shooting down one of the F/A-18's as it was travelling Mach 0.92. The pilot, Lieutenant Commander Scott Speicher, was killed. It is widely believed he died upon the impact of the missile.
 
#12
USN Official history:

17 JAN 91 • At 0130, an (apparent) Iraqi surface-to-air missile shot down Lt. Cmdr. Michael S. Speicher in an F/A-18C Hornet, BuNo 163484, of VFA-81 embarked on board Saratoga (CV 60), during a night strike over Iraq. Speicher thus became the first American casualty of the Persian Gulf War. Additional information subsequently suggested his possible survival, and on 11 January 2001, Secretary of the Navy Richard J. Danzig changed the pilot’s status from killed in action/body not recovered to missing in action. On 11 October 2002, Secretary of the Navy Gordon R. England issued a memorandum that further changed the pilot’s status to missing/captured. In July 2009, Iraqi Bedouins directed a recovery team from Multi-National Force–West to a crash site in the desert 62 miles west of Ramadi in Anbar province. The team recovered remains later confirmed as those of Speicher.

Another version:

On the first night of the war, two F/A-18s from the carrier USS Saratoga were flying outside of Baghdad when two Iraqi MiG-25PDs interceptors from the 96th Squadron engaged them. In the beyond-visual-range (BVR), one of the Iraqi MiGs, piloted by Lieutenant Colonel Zuhair Dawood, fired an R-40 missile, shooting down one of the F/A-18's as it was travelling Mach 0.92. The pilot, Lieutenant Commander Scott Speicher, was killed. It is widely believed he died upon the impact of the missile.
Ahhh, thank you.
 
#14
#15
Counting the number of air-air kills achieved is a particularly poor way to measure the ‘value for money’ of a specific type. By that measure, the B-52 should be considered superior to the F-22 as the former has 2 confirmed kills whereas the F-22 has none! Likewise, is Trident poor value because it has not yet devastated any cities?

So much depends on which nation a type serves with, what sub-variant it is, what weapons are being carried, what RoE are in force, standard of training, level of C2 available, and countless other factors.

For instance, the F-15 is commonly cited as the most effective fighter in service because of it’s kill ratio. Yet comparing a USAF F-15C to a Saudi F-15C, or an F-16C to an F-16A, is similar to comparing an F-4 to a MiG-21; each has very different capabilities. Similarly, Japanese, Korean and Singaporean F-15s have gained no kills (apart from an accidental training blue-on-blue by a JASDF Jet on his wingman).

For instance, some USAF F-15 kills could not have been achieved by those of other nations. Similarly, RAF F3s with only Skyflash and AIM-9L routinely waxed USAF F-15Cs equipped with AMRAAM and AIM-9M on exercise because the former had JTIDS. Moreover, during GW1, RAF F3s were about to engage a pair of Iraqi Mirage F1s BVR when they were hauled off by AWACS to allow a pair of Saudi F-15Cs the political honour of killing something. The RAF crews then watched with frustration as the Saudi pilots screwed up the geometry for an AIM-7 shot before just about managing to convert for AIM-9L kills!

Google SPEICHER F18

and here

An American in the Basement: The Betrayal of Captain Scott Speicher and the Cover-up of His Death


Make of that what you will.
That story has everything - including the best friend marrying the widow only to be told that the husband may still be alive......

Michael Scott Speicher, Captain, United States Navy
Such tabloid stories have been thoroughly debunked and it’s a shame they’re still doing the rounds. Scott Speicher’s tragic story has recently been discussed in the following thread, from both sides:

Iraqi MiG-25 Pilot Explains How he Destroyed a USN FA-18C in GW1.

Speicher’s remains have now been located and identified by DNA analysis close to where they were buried by Bedouin soon after he was shot down in 1991.

Regards,
MM
 
#16
Counting the number of air-air kills achieved is a particularly poor way to measure the ‘value for money’ of a specific type. By that measure, the B-52 should be considered superior to the F-22 as the former has 2 confirmed kills whereas the F-22 has none! Likewise, is Trident poor value because it has not yet devastated any cities?

So much depends on which nation a type serves with, what sub-variant it is, what weapons are being carried, what RoE are in force, standard of training, level of C2 available, and countless other factors.

For instance, the F-15 is commonly cited as the most effective fighter in service because of it’s kill ratio. Yet comparing a USAF F-15C to a Saudi F-15C, or an F-16C to an F-16A, is similar to comparing an F-4 to a MiG-21; each has very different capabilities. Similarly, Japanese, Korean and Singaporean F-15s have gained no kills (apart from an accidental training blue-on-blue by a JASDF Jet on his wingman).

For instance, some USAF F-15 kills could not have been achieved by those of other nations. Similarly, RAF F3s with only Skyflash and AIM-9L routinely waxed USAF F-15Cs equipped with AMRAAM and AIM-9M on exercise because the former had JTIDS. Moreover, during GW1, RAF F3s were about to engage a pair of Iraqi Mirage F1s BVR when they were hauled off by AWACS to allow a pair of Saudi F-15Cs the political honour of killing something. The RAF crews then watched with frustration as the Saudi pilots screwed up the geometry for an AIM-7 shot before just about managing to convert for AIM-9L kills!





Such tabloid stories have been thoroughly debunked and it’s a shame they’re still doing the rounds. Scott Speicher’s tragic story has recently been discussed in the following thread, from both sides:

Iraqi MiG-25 Pilot Explains How he Destroyed a USN FA-18C in GW1.

Speicher’s remains have now been located and identified by DNA analysis close to where they were buried by Bedouin soon after he was shot down in 1991.

Regards,
MM
Yeah. I think that’s what I said.

Thanks for clearing that up.
 

Similar threads


New Posts

Latest Threads

Top