The CIAs loss at Chapman base, in Afghanistan.

#1
#2
It shows that the Taliban are growing evermore sophisticated in getting the guys at Chapman
to believe in a double-agent who then turned suicide bomber.

These guys have upped their game immeasurably since muj times -
most probably due to transferred Iraq experience.

In the 80s the last thing a muj wanted to do was become shaheed,
and suicide bombings were unheard of.

This has ratcheted the conflict up a further few notches - we are no longer just fighting "simple ragheads".
 
#3
RhodieBKK said:
It shows that the Taliban are growing evermore sophisticated in getting the guys at Chapman
to believe in a double-agent who then turned suicide bomber.

These guys have upped their game immeasurably since muj times -
most probably due to transferred Iraq experience.

In the 80s the last thing a muj wanted to do was become shaheed,
and suicide bombings were unheard of.

This has ratcheted the conflict up a further few notches - we are no longer just fighting "simple ragheads".
One of the comments below the article raises the possibility of it being a proxy bomb rather than a suicide bomb. That the guy was coerced rather than turned.
 
#4
CutLunchCommando said:
One of the comments below the article raises the possibility of it being a proxy bomb rather than a suicide bomb. That the guy was coerced rather than turned.
Agreed, another hypothesis is that he could well have been coerced.
The Haqqani's hold total sway down there and could well have discovered his working relationship with the US.
His family could have been detained and he forced to carry out the attack
so that his family would live & possibly be "rewarded" should he succeed.
Either way he was going to die.
But it is becoming clear that they knew him well enough to have people fly in from Kabul,
and the whole FOB team attending.
Yet they trusted him enough not to search him - which sadly has proven to be misplaced.
 
#5
News report have disclosed the named of some of the fallen CIA personnel:

Ohio native, ex-Navy Seal killed in Afghan bombing
January 04, 2010 12:54 AM EST

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A former Navy Seal and an Ohio native whose wife is expecting the couple's first child were among seven people killed in a suicide bombing attack targeting a CIA base in southeastern Afghanistan last week.

Scott Michael Roberson, 39, was working as a security officer for the CIA when the blast on Dec. 30 rocked the remote outpost in Khost province, said his sister, Amy Messner of Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio.

The government notified his wife Wednesday of his death, Messner said, and the CIA has allowed them to make his death public.

Before joining the CIA, Roberson had worked undercover in narcotics for the Atlanta police. He also served with United Nations security forces in Kosovo and did several tours of duty in Iraq, where he provided protection to high-risk officials.

"He always said that if something happened to him, he would have no regrets," his sister said. "He was so proud of what he was doing."

Roberson had hoped to return to the U.S. for the birth of his first child in February, his sister said.

"As hard as all of this is, at least we are able to let the world know what an amazing person Scott was," Messner said. "I can't imagine how hard it would be for those families to not be able to share that."

Roberson is survived by his wife, Molly, of Knoxville, Tenn.; his parents and sister. A memorial service is planned for Saturday in Akron, Ohio.

Jeremy Jason Wise, 35, was also killed in the attack, a memorial page on Facebook said.

Wise, a former Navy Seal, lived in Virginia Beach, Va., with his wife, Dana. He was working as security contractor after leaving the Navy in 2009. A funeral for Wise is expected to be held in the coming days.

Wise's home phone number was not listed. The family declined through an e-mail to release any photos to The Associated Press or to comment further Sunday.

A third man has also been identified as one of the dead, his parents said. Harold E. Brown Jr., 37, of Virginia, served in the Army. His mother said Saturday he worked for the State Department. He is survived by a wife and three children, ages 12, 10 and 2.

The CIA is not releasing information about the victims, citing the sensitivity of their mission and other ongoing operations. The agency is trying to sort out what happened.

Many questions remain as to how the suicide bomber managed to get inside the outpost armed with explosives and why he was exposed to so many agency officers, including the chief of the CIA base who died in the attack, a woman with three children.

Six other agency personnel were wounded in what was considered the most lethal attack for the CIA since the war in Afghanistan began in 2001 and possibly even since the 1983 embassy bombing in Beirut.

The bombing occurred at a former military base on the edge of Khost city, the capital of Khost province, which borders Pakistan and is a Taliban stronghold.

The Taliban has claimed responsibility.

____

Associated Press writers Adam Goldman in New York City and John Raby in Charleston, W.Va., contributed to this report.
 
#6
RhodieBKK said:
Yet they trusted him enough not to search him - which sadly has proven to be misplaced.
Rhodie, following on from your comment about their sophistication, I read on here somewhere about an extremist who very narrowly failed to kill a Saudi prince (?) with an internal bomb which was powerful enough to embed his arm in the ceiling, The prince survived, almost unharmed, undoubtedly gooey, through sheer luck.

The enemy would spare no effort if they thought it would kill CIA, so a search may have yielded nothing anyway.
 
#7
RhodieBKK said:
These guys have upped their game immeasurably since muj times - most probably due to transferred Iraq experience.
Utter tripe. There were no Mujahadin / Taliban in Iraq. All that garbage about Iraq being involved with 9/11 and Afghanistan wasn't actually true. Don't tell me you believe that Saddam had WMD too?
 
#8
PoisonDwarf said:
RhodieBKK said:
These guys have upped their game immeasurably since muj times - most probably due to transferred Iraq experience.
Utter tripe. There were no Mujahadin / Taliban in Iraq. All that garbage about Iraq being involved with 9/11 and Afghanistan wasn't actually true. Don't tell me you believe that Saddam had WMD too?
You have evidently misread my post, particularly if you have extrapolated 9-11 conspiracy theories from it re Saddam. Huhh :?
Whilst the Talib did not go to Iraq, there has certainly been a transference of experience & technology going the other way.
Particularly in IEDs & the use of suicide bombers that was brought from Iraq to the FATA & then into Afghan.

Similarly WMD - yeah right :?
Like when they unearthed the MiG-25s[an antiquated air-air fighter],
and the chickenhawks tried to claim they were capable WMD.

As for the testical toaster bombing method mentioned by Auscam,
whose MO appears to originate from the Yemen & not Af/Pak,
and used most recently by the Nigerian and previously against the Saudi Prince.
My belief it would have required more than a kilo or two in his shreddies to kill so many.
More likely a waistcoat or body belt.
Reports are still contradictory.
Though none that I have seen that say that he was searched and was not trusted.
 
#9
#10
PoisonDwarf said:
RhodieBKK said:
These guys have upped their game immeasurably since muj times - most probably due to transferred Iraq experience.
Utter tripe. There were no Mujahadin / Taliban in Iraq. All that garbage about Iraq being involved with 9/11 and Afghanistan wasn't actually true. Don't tell me you believe that Saddam had WMD too?
No, but there is evidence that Iran is a major player in Iraq. Would you care to deny that they are a major player across one of their other borders?

msr
 
#11
Terrorists learn from the mistakes and successes of others... t'interweb and even terrorist exchange programmes exist, a bit like Long Look.

The 'botty bomber' certainly brought a whole new level of 'following through' in to the game, and certainly opened some eyes.... starting with his own brown eye :D

Whatever comes out in the wash about the CIA bombing, it will show that once again the terrs have raised the ante. New counter-measures will be brought in, and the terrs will eventually breach them.

It's like the warhead-armour competition, never ending and one side is ALWAYS at a disadvantage.
 
#12
Whatever comes out in the wash about the CIA bombing, it will show that once again the terrs have raised the ante. New counter-measures will be brought in, and the terrs will eventually breach them.
Don't necessarily agree with the implication that this raises the game to a new level. It does demonstrate the sophistication of Haqqani Intel and Planning. They are mirroring the CIA's campaign of targeting assets. Successfully in this case and due, it must be said to a failure in security at FOB Chapman.

20/20 hindsight, but such important eggs need a really good basket.

B
 
#13
msr said:
No, but there is evidence that Iran is a major player in Iraq. Would you care to deny that they are a major player across one of their other borders?
msr
Iran has had an interest in Afghanistan for centuries that very much continues to this day.
Based upon regional politics as much as ethnic & religious ties, they have been particularly active in Herat & the Hazarajat - where Khomeini's picture was on prominent widespread display during the 80s.
Initially it should be noted that Iran provided the US with limited assistance post 9/11.
However, Tehran was also harbouring Hekmatyar as well as some of OBL's kids.
About the sametime Iran's name was added to the list of future neocon targets after Iraq at the beginning of 2002, Hekmatyar was released into Afg rather than being handed over, and became a not much loved addition to the Taliban's orbat.
Any "after action report" on the two wars should look at how Iran was mishandled and could have been brought "on-sides" as an ally of sorts - certainly in Afg, but maybe not after Iraq.
Whilst there is little love for the Taliban in Tehran, out of all the many years of fighting sadly the one country that has benefited regionally has been Iran.

Apologies for the distraction, as there is more news coming out on the Jordanian bomber.
WaPo 09 01 10
and
Bombing Reconstruction
further update...
Martyrdom Video
 
#14
One of the intelligence officers killed was actually not CIA but an intelligence officer with the US State Department. Harold Brown Jr was a former US Army Major. He had a wife and three kids.

He was from Massachusetts and his funeral was on TV here last night. In typical New England fashion the local police and fire from his town turned out for an honor guard on the steps of the church. His wife gave a strong eulogy and clearly was very proud of him and his work. He had military honors at the cemetery but in lieu of the traditional playing of Taps by a military bugler it was played by his son and daughter on saxaphone and clarinet. A very moving moment.

WBZ=TV link

Boston Globe story
 

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