The Castle Thread

Londo

LE
Eltz castle Germany
The castle is a so-called Ganerbenburg, or castle belonging to community of joint heirs. This is a castle divided into several parts, which belong to different families or different branches of a family; this usually occurs when multiple owners of one or more territories jointly build a castle to house themselves. Only wealthy medieval European lords could afford to build castles or equivalent structures on their lands; many of them only owned one village, or even only part of a village. This was an insufficient base to afford castles. Such lords usually lived in "knight's houses", which were fairly simple houses, scarcely bigger than those of their tenants. In some parts of the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation, inheritance law required that the estate be divided among all successors. These successors, each of whose individual inheritance was too small to build a castle of his own, could build a castle together, where each owned one separate part for housing and all of them together shared the defensive fortification. In the case of Eltz, the family comprised three branches and the existing castle was enhanced with three separate complexes of buildings.

The main part of the castle consists of the family portions. At up to eight stories, these eight towers reach heights of between 30 and 40 metres (98 and 131 ft). They are fortified with strong exterior walls; to the yard they present a partial framework. About 100 members of the owners' families lived in the over 100 rooms of the castle. A village once existed below the castle, on its southside, which housed servants, craftsman, and their families supporting the castle.

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PFGEN

GCM
Eltz castle Germany
The castle is a so-called Ganerbenburg, or castle belonging to community of joint heirs. This is a castle divided into several parts, which belong to different families or different branches of a family; this usually occurs when multiple owners of one or more territories jointly build a castle to house themselves. Only wealthy medieval European lords could afford to build castles or equivalent structures on their lands; many of them only owned one village, or even only part of a village. This was an insufficient base to afford castles. Such lords usually lived in "knight's houses", which were fairly simple houses, scarcely bigger than those of their tenants. In some parts of the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation, inheritance law required that the estate be divided among all successors. These successors, each of whose individual inheritance was too small to build a castle of his own, could build a castle together, where each owned one separate part for housing and all of them together shared the defensive fortification. In the case of Eltz, the family comprised three branches and the existing castle was enhanced with three separate complexes of buildings.

The main part of the castle consists of the family portions. At up to eight stories, these eight towers reach heights of between 30 and 40 metres (98 and 131 ft). They are fortified with strong exterior walls; to the yard they present a partial framework. About 100 members of the owners' families lived in the over 100 rooms of the castle. A village once existed below the castle, on its southside, which housed servants, craftsman, and their families supporting the castle.

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Burg Eltz is a cracking castle. Fits all the story book images and well worth a visit if you're in the area.
 

Londo

LE
Burg Eltz is a cracking castle. Fits all the story book images and well worth a visit if you're in the area.
It sure looks the part . Unfortunately I don't think I'll ever make the journey so I'll have to console myself by looking at web sites and watching videos of the place .
 
erbe, which is at the root. is effectively what you inherit. But it was in some respects no different to the feuding of the Bishoprics here and the Land holders surrounding, i.e not all land was held by the Nobility, some was was held by right but they paid the Knights fee to the Local Lord. For example a woman in England could hold property of her right, if she married then that property transferred to the Husband. If she remained un married, i.e her husband had died and her male children survived then, she had to pay the local lord the fee of a knight until she had one. That's essentially the core of the Parzival Story
 

Londo

LE
Prefer the history of UK castles but the German ones seem so much more photogenic
Thurant Castle, Germany
thurant castle.jpg
 
They are indeed photogenic. By design, fuelled by Romanticism. You will be aware that most are 19thc rebuilds on older foundations - a bit like Bamburgh. The rather sniffy but priceless Burgenwelt web site will not list Eltz as a medieval castle.
 
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Londo

LE
They are indeed photogenic. By design, fuelled by Romanticism. You will be aware that most are 19thc rebuilds on older foundations - a bit like Bamburgh
Very aware . Most these places have a history of disrepair and rebuilding over the ages .
Saves seeing just a heap of rubble and stones I guess :-D
 
Here is a castle which has not been substantially rebuilt. In fact it is one of the best preserved Norman castles in Britain, if not Europe. The shell keep was rebuilt following a fire in the 19thc but the kitchen/screens passage/hall/ solar arrangement is intact.
 

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Londo

LE
Here is a castle which has not been substantially rebuilt. In fact it is one of the best preserved Norman castles in Britain, if not Europe. The shell keep was rebuilt following a fire in the 19thc but the kitchen/screens passage/hall/ solar arrangement is intact.
Occupied and maintained over the years ? It does help rather than leaving them empty and disintegrating .
Once the roof starts to rot and fall in it's surprising how fast a building can fall into complete ruin .
 
The Bishop's Suite and view of the (phoney) keep. One surprising survival is that the Norman solar block has survived for three storeys. The top floor has been subdivided to form a gallery. In the interior the Norman windows are intact. On the outside they have been given the gothick treatment. The views are superlative The Norman kitchen is also intact and still supplies food to the students. Not only can you visit the Castle, it is also possible to stay here.
 

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Fulgur Diorum ?
 

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Fulgar Diorum ?
Mate, could you do me a favour and post your images as 'Full Image' rather than thumbnails, it's a bit of a drag having to view each image one by one instead of in line.
 
Mate, could you do me a favour and post your images as 'Full Image' rather than thumbnails, it's a bit of a drag having to view each image one by one instead of in line.
OK but I am new here and still finding my feet posting stuff like images
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Occupied and maintained over the years ? It does help rather than leaving them empty and disintegrating .
Once the roof starts to rot and fall in it's surprising how fast a building can fall into complete ruin .

Used to see the same in Orkney with old farmhouses and crofts.

They used a dry rubble construct.
Inner and outer layers of stone packed inbetween with "dry rubble", basically debris, small stones and clay. Good against the weather and well insulating against the wind.

However, as soon as the roof goes, water gets in from the top, washes out rubble, walls then collapse in on themselves.
 

2000AD

Old-Salt
Kirby Muxloe castle in Leicestershire is a fortified mansion that was built for Lord Hastings, who was dramatically seized and executed by Richard III in 1483. Hastings’ descendants still believe they have a direct line to the throne of England.
Not really a castle in the proper sense. Although it sits on a piece of relatively high ground its not in a particularly commanding position.
 

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Kirby Muxloe castle in Leicestershire is a fortified mansion that was built for Lord Hastings, who was dramatically seized and executed by Richard III in 1483. Hastings’ descendants still believe they have a direct line to the throne of England.
Not really a castle in the proper sense. Although it sits on a piece of relatively high ground its not in a particularly commanding position.
It looks late 15thc
 

Londo

LE
Used to see the same in Orkney with old farmhouses and crofts.

They used a dry rubble construct.
Inner and outer layers of stone packed inbetween with "dry rubble", basically debris, small stones and clay. Good against the weather and well insulating against the wind.

However, as soon as the roof goes, water gets in from the top, washes out rubble, walls then collapse in on themselves.
See that down here as well , drove past the wreck of an old cottage today that 12 years back was a roofless ruin and falling apart .
Today noticed it was just a mound in the undergrown .
If I hadn't known it was there and looking out for it I just wouldn't have noticed it having been there .
Give it a month or two when the undergrowth thickens up it would not be visible unless you were standing on it .
 
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Sintra Castle, Portugal 2019. Mrs Carbon said it was the most interesting holiday we’ve ever taken.
 

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