If you are interested in Fenians and Orangemen in Canada, the following is a rather interesting history.
Terence Corcoran: St. Patrick’s Day's troubled history in Canada

Here's a brief excerpt. I recommend reading the whole thing as it provides a lot more context for the events in question and draws some interesting parallels with today's problems with militant Islamists.

This weekend’s cheerful celebrants of St. Patrick’s Day will be unaware of the parade’s troubled history. In 1867, the year of Confederation, there was no parade in Toronto. For the second year in a row, the city’s Catholic bishop had banned the parade after warnings that the organizers had been taken over by the Hibernian Brotherhood, portrayed by McGee and others as a front for Fenian revolutionaries. The year before, amid rumours of a Fenian invasion from the south, McGee had warned of violence if the Toronto parade took place.

The risk of violence at a public event, as today, was real. The Catholic organizers of the Toronto parades deliberately aimed to provoke the city’s dominant Protestant power elites, led by members of the Orange Order. Protestants, in turn, mounted “No Popery” campaigns that were galvanized and animated by warring newspapers. In 1858, attempts by militant Protestants to disrupt the parade produced a violent confrontation that led to the death of an Irish-Catholic man.

Historian Michael Cottrell wrote that the 1858 parade murder produced much anxiety among Toronto’s Irish Catholics. “Prejudice, harassment and attacks on Catholic Priests and church property all contributed to the growth of a siege mentality.”

David Wilson, in his McGee biography, recalls some of the clashes typical of the time. “In May 1864 an Orange crowd attacked the Corpus Christie procession in Toronto. On Guy Fawkes night, amid rumours that Orangemen were planning to burn effigies of the Pope … the Hibernians decided to take action. At midnight, four hundred men, many of them carrying guns and pikes, gathered at Queen’s Park.” No confrontation ensued, but the events established a general climate of fear and distrust among the city’s Catholics.
 

Azani

Old-Salt
The only problem with Canzuk, is Canada, and Australia, both have chinese influence creeping in, if war ever breaks out, they will have a problem. China could easily throw 50 million at australia, and it wouldn't dent them, but change australian. That amount of people, that quick, would not have them assimilated, and would have heavy links back to china.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
The only problem with Canzuk, is Canada, and Australia, both have chinese influence creeping in, if war ever breaks out, they will have a problem. China could easily throw 50 million at australia, and it wouldn't dent them, but change australian. That amount of people, that quick, would not have them assimilated, and would have heavy links back to china.
Have you been to Sydney or Melbourne lately? It's happening already.
 
If you are interested in Fenians and Orangemen in Canada, the following is a rather interesting history.
Terence Corcoran: St. Patrick’s Day's troubled history in Canada

Here's a brief excerpt. I recommend reading the whole thing as it provides a lot more context for the events in question and draws some interesting parallels with today's problems with militant Islamists.

This weekend’s cheerful celebrants of St. Patrick’s Day will be unaware of the parade’s troubled history. In 1867, the year of Confederation, there was no parade in Toronto. For the second year in a row, the city’s Catholic bishop had banned the parade after warnings that the organizers had been taken over by the Hibernian Brotherhood, portrayed by McGee and others as a front for Fenian revolutionaries. The year before, amid rumours of a Fenian invasion from the south, McGee had warned of violence if the Toronto parade took place.

The risk of violence at a public event, as today, was real. The Catholic organizers of the Toronto parades deliberately aimed to provoke the city’s dominant Protestant power elites, led by members of the Orange Order. Protestants, in turn, mounted “No Popery” campaigns that were galvanized and animated by warring newspapers. In 1858, attempts by militant Protestants to disrupt the parade produced a violent confrontation that led to the death of an Irish-Catholic man.

Historian Michael Cottrell wrote that the 1858 parade murder produced much anxiety among Toronto’s Irish Catholics. “Prejudice, harassment and attacks on Catholic Priests and church property all contributed to the growth of a siege mentality.”

David Wilson, in his McGee biography, recalls some of the clashes typical of the time. “In May 1864 an Orange crowd attacked the Corpus Christie procession in Toronto. On Guy Fawkes night, amid rumours that Orangemen were planning to burn effigies of the Pope … the Hibernians decided to take action. At midnight, four hundred men, many of them carrying guns and pikes, gathered at Queen’s Park.” No confrontation ensued, but the events established a general climate of fear and distrust among the city’s Catholics.

The squared toed (fenian) rebellion, the raid on Chester etc.. 1867-ish. Bonkers.
 
On Guy Fawkes night, amid rumours that Orangemen were planning to burn effigies of the Pope …
Hmmm? Canadians celebrated Guy Fawkes night? That's a surprise. Must have been first gen immigrants from the Old Country. November in Canada is a whole different proposition than November in the UK. It would be nice though to have a roaring bonfire in the Great White North to gather around.
 
Hmmm? Canadians celebrated Guy Fawkes night? That's a surprise. Must have been first gen immigrants from the Old Country. November in Canada is a whole different proposition than November in the UK. It would be nice though to have a roaring bonfire in the Great White North to gather around.
Can't use Great White North as a description for Canada anymore, apparently its been deemed racist...
 
What about Londonderry Air?
No one sings the beautiful Londonderry Air as it's a tune (clue's in the name), they do sing Danny Boy however.

Anyway back on topic, I have to agree with the poster above who questions this notion of some form of coalition of like-minded nations in a CANZUK pact, and that if there was most posters here would like what they got.

I often see it when people tell me "Ah if I was younger I would leave the UK and move to New Zealand" thinking that when they get there they will find a version of old Blighty preserved in aspic since the 1950s. I often wonder do they ever read the news, have they not seen the very clear political direction NZ has been moving in for at least a quarter of a century or more? Haven't they read about the Kiwi prime minister? You can't miss her, she's the darling of The Guardian and the BBC.

Same with Canada, only there the process dates back much further to the time the father of the current PM was in charge, and the apple didn't fall far from the tree with junior.

As regards Australia, Britain with sunshine? Have a look at any expensive private school in Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide or Perth and ask yourself whether the kids there are hankering after greater ties with the Motherland. Maybe they are, probably not, but if they are, the Motherland in question is a rather large nation a few thousand miles to the north in the Asian landmass and not a couple of rainy islands off the northwest coast of Europe.

Gone are the days when Canada, Australia and New Zealand were the rugged "Lion cubs of Empire", peopled with stout fellows in interesting hats called Billy or Smudger or Mac who spoke with almost British accents and doffed their caps to the Queen Empress and automatically rolled up their sleeves to fight Britain's wars when Westminster unilaterally blew the bugle. For those seeking ever closer union with Canada, Australia or New Zealand, I merely say "be careful what you wish for".

If you really want an old-fashioned former dominion that shares your outlook in the world you'd be better looking to India but I do realise the sort of conniptions that suggestion would cause on this forum.
 
No one sings the beautiful Londonderry Air as it's a tune (clue's in the name), they do sing Danny Boy however.

Anyway back on topic, I have to agree with the poster above who questions this notion of some form of coalition of like-minded nations in a CANZUK pact, and that if there was most posters here would like what they got.

I often see it when people tell me "Ah if I was younger I would leave the UK and move to New Zealand" thinking that when they get there they will find a version of old Blighty preserved in aspic since the 1950s. I often wonder do they ever read the news, have they not seen the very clear political direction NZ has been moving in for at least a quarter of a century or more? Haven't they read about the Kiwi prime minister? You can't miss her, she's the darling of The Guardian and the BBC.

Same with Canada, only there the process dates back much further to the time the father of the current PM was in charge, and the apple didn't fall far from the tree with junior.

As regards Australia, Britain with sunshine? Have a look at any expensive private school in Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide or Perth and ask yourself whether the kids there are hankering after greater ties with the Motherland. Maybe they are, probably not, but if they are, the Motherland in question is a rather large nation a few thousand miles to the north in the Asian landmass and not a couple of rainy islands off the northwest coast of Europe.

Gone are the days when Canada, Australia and New Zealand were the rugged "Lion cubs of Empire", peopled with stout fellows in interesting hats called Billy or Smudger or Mac who spoke with almost British accents and doffed their caps to the Queen Empress and automatically rolled up their sleeves to fight Britain's wars when Westminster unilaterally blew the bugle. For those seeking ever closer union with Canada, Australia or New Zealand, I merely say "be careful what you wish for".

If you really want an old-fashioned former dominion that shares your outlook in the world you'd be better looking to India but I do realise the sort of conniptions that suggestion would cause on this forum.
With respect to Canada, there is an election in 5 days time, and the two leading parties are neck and neck. The leader of the Conservatives, Erin O'Toole is a prominent promoter of CANZUK, brings it up repeatedly, and has said he would make it a priority if elected.

A quick google for recent references shows him here in a news conference on the 9th of September after an election debate with the other leaders.


I suspect that the most significant parts of CANZUK however would centre around closer foreign policy cooperation, as well as trade, scientific, cultural, security, and other related matters rather than the limited "free movement" (which is not like EU "free movement") being proposed. "Free movement" gets mentioned because when they did opinion polls it was the thing which got the attention of most average people as having some personal benefit to them while the others all seemed rather abstract and remote.
 

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