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The Camper Caper.

TheSnake

Clanker
The Transporter is now finished!
I am really Impressed with the finish. It wasn't cheap, but you pay for what you get, right?
Anyway, here it is in all it's glory...
 

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Awol

LE
Right chaps, camper update. Apologies for the delay, but less than perfect health has slowed things down a bit.

Firstly I finished the insulation (on the left hand side anyway, I’m focusing on one side at a time)...

AD5B8536-6A72-4A29-BC38-C404553A8CA2.jpeg
AD5B8536-6A72-4A29-BC38-C404553A8CA2.jpeg

I made sure that every single little gap was filled with filler so that no heat leakage can occur. The downside was that it took forever to fill EVERY gap in three layers/inches of polystyrene/xps foam.

Once insulated, I needed to fit a vapour barrier. I had purchased what I thought were some BFO clear plastic dust sheets, but they turned out to be made of a thin fabric and thus useless as a vapour barrier.

Instead I rooted around and found a brand new tarpaulin, a bit OTT for the purpose, but it’ll certainly do the job.

Next came the wall covering itself, I was going to use ply, but decided on hardboard, it being cheaper and lighter. I know it’s vulnerable to water damage and damp, but I don’t expect there to be any of that, plus I’ve used it in a camper years ago and it was fine.

More to follow later today....
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
Right chaps, camper update. Apologies for the delay, but less than perfect health has slowed things down a bit.

Firstly I finished the insulation (on the left hand side anyway, I’m focusing on one side at a time)...

View attachment 504198View attachment 504198
I made sure that every single little gap was filled with filler so that no heat leakage can occur. The downside was that it took forever to fill EVERY gap in three layers/inches of polystyrene/xps foam.

Once insulated, I needed to fit a vapour barrier. I had purchased what I thought were some BFO clear plastic dust sheets, but they turned out to be made of a thin fabric and thus useless as a vapour barrier.

Instead I rooted around and found a brand new tarpaulin, a bit OTT for the purpose, but it’ll certainly do the job.

Next came the wall covering itself, I was going to use ply, but decided on hardboard, it being cheaper and lighter. I know it’s vulnerable to water damage and damp, but I don’t expect there to be any of that, plus I’ve used it in a camper years ago and it was fine.

More to follow later today....
GIVE IT A COAT OF pva MIXED 50/50 WITH WATER FIRST
 

Awol

LE
After covering the wall with hardboard I had to become Laurence Llewelyn-Bowen and consider the internal décor. After some considerable time wandering hopelessly up and down the wallpaper aisle in B&Q I settled on some white vinyl flecked with colourful specks. It’s bright, waterproof and the design will disguise any imperfections etc. I applied it with some waterproof pasty stuff.

Next came the thorny issue of cupboardry (new word) and, after giving it quite a lot of thought, I hit upon the idea of using a door, laid sideways and hinged at the bottom. This gave excellent access to the cupboard space and also meant that when open completely, ie flat on the floor, it provided a platform for a possible bed (I’m still unsure how the bed is going to be fitted ultimately, but this does give me another option).

F8AE64D5-CB89-49FA-BE76-08AE896C4891.jpeg
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BCAB9081-5B13-4396-B7BB-930FB29375ED.jpeg
F8AE64D5-CB89-49FA-BE76-08AE896C4891.jpeg
BCAB9081-5B13-4396-B7BB-930FB29375ED.jpeg


Then I needed to think what to use as a worktop. I’m not too keen on conventional laminate worktops as fitted in most kitchens, preferring instead the timber look (besides which, the kitcheny bits are going to be on the other side of the van, where all the water and drain pipes are fitted).

So being a particular fan of beech, I started looking for beech worktops, but soon stopped because the prices made my eyes bleed. Instead I had a flash of inspiration, and had soon bought this little puppy for a whole £10...

9C864C7A-4987-47DF-AC77-9F4BECA3EA03.jpeg


A bit of enthusiastic circular saw work and I had a rather lovely worktop (it helps that the cupboard, and hence the worktop, are not very deep, nevertheless, I still need to cannibalise the rest of the table to infil the gap at the back of the worktop and make it hinge upwards).

E1305380-6D4E-4CBE-B01A-12E424268A47.jpeg


So that’s where things stand at the moment.... lots more to do, but I’m quite happy with what I’ve done so far.

(Apologies for the duplicate images. I’m doing this from my phone and it seems to be duplicating the occasional image without giving me the option to delete just one of them).
 

wheel

LE
The Transporter is now finished!
I am really Impressed with the finish. It wasn't cheap, but you pay for what you get, right?
Anyway, here it is in all it's glory...
I hope that you are a midget or you will not be able to stand up to use the sink and cooker
 
I would have used space blankets instead of the vapour barrier , you are missing out on reflective insulation now.

In any case I'm only familiar with steel boats but no vapour barrier is used on them, its probably better to let the ply breathe.

Separating timber from steel work with a damp proof membrane is a good idea though.
 
I would have used space blankets instead of the vapour barrier , you are missing out on reflective insulation now.

In any case I'm only familiar with steel boats but no vapour barrier is used on them, its probably better to let the ply breathe.

Separating timber from steel work with a damp proof membrane is a good idea though.

Use the same principle as you would when building a house; cross ventilation with a low level inflow vent and a high level outflow vent. It keeps the air moving and as moist air tends to be warmer it will rise and exit the higher level vent. It pays to insulate vents too as they will get cold from the outside air and moist air will condense on them and dribble back into the vehicle - some sort of flexible adhesive foam sheeting will do.
 
After covering the wall with hardboard I had to become Laurence Llewelyn-Bowen and consider the internal décor. After some considerable time wandering hopelessly up and down the wallpaper aisle in B&Q I settled on some white vinyl flecked with colourful specks. It’s bright, waterproof and the design will disguise any imperfections etc. I applied it with some waterproof pasty stuff.

Next came the thorny issue of cupboardry (new word) and, after giving it quite a lot of thought, I hit upon the idea of using a door, laid sideways and hinged at the bottom. This gave excellent access to the cupboard space and also meant that when open completely, ie flat on the floor, it provided a platform for a possible bed (I’m still unsure how the bed is going to be fitted ultimately, but this does give me another option).

View attachment 504280View attachment 504281View attachment 504282View attachment 504280View attachment 504282

Then I needed to think what to use as a worktop. I’m not too keen on conventional laminate worktops as fitted in most kitchens, preferring instead the timber look (besides which, the kitcheny bits are going to be on the other side of the van, where all the water and drain pipes are fitted).

So being a particular fan of beech, I started looking for beech worktops, but soon stopped because the prices made my eyes bleed. Instead I had a flash of inspiration, and had soon bought this little puppy for a whole £10...

View attachment 504283

A bit of enthusiastic circular saw work and I had a rather lovely worktop (it helps that the cupboard, and hence the worktop, are not very deep, nevertheless, I still need to cannibalise the rest of the table to infil the gap at the back of the worktop and make it hinge upwards).

View attachment 504285

So that’s where things stand at the moment.... lots more to do, but I’m quite happy with what I’ve done so far.

(Apologies for the duplicate images. I’m doing this from my phone and it seems to be duplicating the occasional image without giving me the option to delete just one of them).

Is that going to be the bed?
 
Consider the traditional cabin of a working narrowboat which were all roughly the same layout, they developed it over a long period of time into the perfect use of space, the families lived full time in 6 ft wide by 8ft long, there's a fold down bed with two big storage drawers underneath, a coal fired heating and cooking range, the food cupboard door doubles as the table, more storage draws and cupboards all over and there is a large galvanised hand bowl that goes with it which is your all purpose sink.
download (8).jpeg
download (9).jpeg
images (7).jpeg

I lived in one and I couldn't improve on it .
 

philc

LE
Thinking of getting one of these just for camping expeditions, 2 people plus 2 tents, 1 for putting up for a night and one larger one for longer and all the gear needed, extra lights & roof box, cool box, second leisure battery, small wine chiller, better seats, shocks and other bits. 80 MPG, on the saving every 4/5 night a hotel.

6c3b43608a204c5e80ccd9f3d4fdfeb4.jpg
 

Awol

LE
Is that going to be the bed?
I tried it out for one night using an air bed on top of the lowered door. There was no discernible improvement over being direct on the floor and my fat arrse put dimples in the door, so I won’t be doing that again.

I slept in it again last week and the outside temp went down to 6 degrees C. I spent the night on a deflating air bed, fully dressed in a doss bag, with a duvet, a hammock, a blanket and a coat on me. I was still freezing and every time I moved, everything slid off. Plus I had to blow up the air bed every two hours. Not much fun.

So... I’ve ordered a diesel cabin heater and a 5 season carp fishing sleeping bag from Amazon, should be with me in the next two days. I’ll post the fitting procedure.
 

Poppy

LE
I tried it out for one night using an air bed on top of the lowered door. There was no discernible improvement over being direct on the floor and my fat arrse put dimples in the door, so I won’t be doing that again.

I slept in it again last week and the outside temp went down to 6 degrees C. I spent the night on a deflating air bed, fully dressed in a doss bag, with a duvet, a hammock, a blanket and a coat on me. I was still freezing and every time I moved, everything slid off. Plus I had to blow up the air bed every two hours. Not much fun.

So... I’ve ordered a diesel cabin heater and a 5 season carp fishing sleeping bag from Amazon, should be with me in the next two days. I’ll post the fitting procedure.

air beds don't have any insulation so you need a foil backed mat under it
 

NSP

LE
There’s four inches of air in the bed, plus two inches of high density XPS foam insulation on the floor.
Air is not a very good insulator. Have had the same when camping - lying on a bag of cold air on a thin groundsheet on the cold ground and it doesn't matter how many layers are over. Get some under, too. I use a quilted mattress topper on the air bed, then a duvet as a sheet. Duvet over the top and toasty warm.
 

Awol

LE
Air is not a very good insulator. Have had the same when camping - lying on a bag of cold air on a thin groundsheet on the cold ground and it doesn't matter how many layers are over. Get some under, too. I use a quilted mattress topper on the air bed, then a duvet as a sheet. Duvet over the top and toasty warm.
I need to get it right, as from next week I’m going to be living in it, having travelled 80 miles to take up a new job. The alternative was to live in the boss’s spare room for £550 a month.

Back to the van, tonight I’ve just started to clean out the toilet/shower cubicle....


441EAE58-8F45-48F0-8218-548524C0230A.jpeg


I also took out the bog poo tank to empty it. I was lucky, I was expecting it to be full of the previous owner’s logs and piss, but it was empty, so a quick hose out (in the neighbour’s flower bed, obviously), loads of thick bleach, and I slid it back into the van. Tomorrow I’m going to give the shower cubicle a good scrubbing, add yet more bleach, and it’ll be good to go. The bog will work fine, but the gas hot water heater needs the attentions of a plumber before I can get any hot water. In the meantime, it’ll be hot water from a kettle and a sponge to keep the smeg at bay.
 

NSP

LE
Get a cheap rubber-backed mat to put in the shower tray for when you want an Eartha Kitt or Jimmy Riddle without faffing about taking your shoes off - will keep it cleaner and also stop your socks getting damp if there's still wet in the tray and you have got your shoes off.
 

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