The Camper Caper.

Awol

LE
I took the ply off the left side of the van today and this is the existing insulation..

049A89C2-9DA9-4514-A244-174F0E8B5B9D.jpeg


The reverse side of the old ply lining showed that condensation has indeed been a problem in the past.

2042E95C-833F-45B2-8EA1-FAF63B4870CA.jpeg
 
None of the insulation is sealed , it should have been gap filled with foam , any framing drilled and filled full of foam. Foil taped seams probably as well.
 
You might be able to pick stuff up at one of these places:


Static caravans don't seem to suffer from condensation on that scale and they have a similar construction to a van. I'd see how they manage it.
 
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I took the ply off the left side of the van today and this is the existing insulation..

View attachment 493300

The reverse side of the old ply lining showed that condensation has indeed been a problem in the past.

View attachment 493301
roofs ‘sweating’,
Common problem with panel vans. roofs the coldest part, warm damp air rises, condensation is attracted to the coldest area - and condenses out and runs down the sides.

See the need for a roof light or some sort of fletner or similar roof vent.
 

Awol

LE
Update - fitting insulation is a right git. The past few days have been spent ripping out the old badly fitting polystyrene insulation and refitting it to make sure there are no gaps. Also, I filled (laboriously) all the metal gullies and channels that criss-cross the sides.

I then (inevitably very messily) filled any gaps around the polystyrene with expanding foam, or, where the gap was too narrow to get the foam nozzle inside, acrylic filler.

The end result is that both sides are now effectively insulated with no gaps anywhere. To add even more I intend to cover the whole thing with one inch polystyrene sheet, giving a total of three inches of insulation.

13AB7A0F-CCE1-413D-8F7F-75C7106C713F.jpeg


All the bubbling excess will be trimmed off tomorrow when it’s properly cured.

Next on the list is putting the floor down..
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
I am going to do a conversion on a newish Renault Kangoo for a saffer friend
however some of the kits we have seen look like hotel rooms, and will add weight, plus she needs to be able to use it as a car if she changes job, and get her possesions in it
The other thing to think about is if things change and she needs to sell it, small camper vans do not fetch much money, most people want their own conversion, so it all needs to be removable
I plan to make a bed frame from re inforced ply, that will fold like a pasting table for storage, and a cabinet to sit between the front and back seats to add strength and to provide storage
then a couple of simple large cabinets in the rear that can lift out, one to contain camping kit, the other with a lift up lid to reveal a gas cooker, and a washing up bowl, and compartments to store the kitchen stuff
then add a clip on cover to the rear to sheild it in bad weather
cooking and cleaning to be done with the back door open, no risk of fumes
then with two sliding doors easy access to the bed
I have seen far too many awful conversions, featuring huge Television sets and masses of highly flammable furnishings and shitty led lights
might ping a few pics
going to measure it in a few weeks once she has sorted her stuff out, then do a set of provisional drawings
not sure about finish, will probably paint the ply a light colour to make it cheerful
 

Awol

LE
I am going to do a conversion on a newish Renault Kangoo for a saffer friend
however some of the kits we have seen look like hotel rooms, and will add weight, plus she needs to be able to use it as a car if she changes job, and get her possesions in it
The other thing to think about is if things change and she needs to sell it, small camper vans do not fetch much money, most people want their own conversion, so it all needs to be removable
I plan to make a bed frame from re inforced ply, that will fold like a pasting table for storage, and a cabinet to sit between the front and back seats to add strength and to provide storage
then a couple of simple large cabinets in the rear that can lift out, one to contain camping kit, the other with a lift up lid to reveal a gas cooker, and a washing up bowl, and compartments to store the kitchen stuff
then add a clip on cover to the rear to sheild it in bad weather
cooking and cleaning to be done with the back door open, no risk of fumes
then with two sliding doors easy access to the bed
I have seen far too many awful conversions, featuring huge Television sets and masses of highly flammable furnishings and shitty led lights
might ping a few pics
going to measure it in a few weeks once she has sorted her stuff out, then do a set of provisional drawings
not sure about finish, will probably paint the ply a light colour to make it cheerful
Isn’t a Kangoo a bit on the small side?
 

sunny james

War Hero
Update - fitting insulation is a right git. The past few days have been spent ripping out the old badly fitting polystyrene insulation and refitting it to make sure there are no gaps. Also, I filled (laboriously) all the metal gullies and channels that criss-cross the sides.

I then (inevitably very messily) filled any gaps around the polystyrene with expanding foam, or, where the gap was too narrow to get the foam nozzle inside, acrylic filler.

The end result is that both sides are now effectively insulated with no gaps anywhere. To add even more I intend to cover the whole thing with one inch polystyrene sheet, giving a total of three inches of insulation.

View attachment 494156

All the bubbling excess will be trimmed off tomorrow when it’s properly cured.

Next on the list is putting the floor down..
Recommend that you lay a couple of lengths of cable in conduit across the van floor before laying insulation and flooring. You will almost certainly need power on both sides of the van. Cables going down the sides of the van or up to the roof can tap into these. I would use 16mm or 25 mm welding cable.
 

Truxx

LE
But presumably you are going to put stuff in the cabinets that isn't weightless? (Technically it's not the weight that's an issue, but the mass, which acquires kinetic energy as you motor along, and then needs to transfer it to something when you corner or stop.)
Fixing to the sides might be adequate, but I'd go for putting some sort of timber footing in before getting the floor insulation down.
ooo hark at you with your Newtons Laws...
 

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