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The Bundeswehr Veterans Badge


The only thing with an 'end' is your grasp of reality.

I get that Holocaust survivors and some others may dislike the Germans, but the rest, and in that I mean 99.999999%, of the world has moved on.
 
What about those who served in the NVA? Do they get a badge too?

Here's their version

1602152097361.png
 

Arte_et_Marte

ADC
Moderator
Ex squaddies of opposing sides have a common theme, they at one stage in their young lives tried to kill each other, and now have a respect for each others soldering skills. Civilians who had to endure bombings, and in the occupied country's, see their family members forcibly enslaved, shot, and made homeless have long memory's, my mother was bombed oView attachment 510549ut, twice, an uncle was caught and tortured,.

Any ex squaddies in civvies who have an iron cross on his lapel is going to draw attention to themselves, mostly from people like my mother, and her generation, who had to endure the war years. The good folk of the old east end, and contrary to popular thinking, there are still many who haven't moved away, have long memories. As do the same generation of the many countries that the Germans enslaved.

Today after 75 years of relative peace, comedians still make mention in their act of the Germans, what they done is beyond comprehension and human understanding, and so memories persist, only when my parents, both still alive have all gone, perhaps the stories, newsreel films and documentary's on TV will be perceived in a more tolerable light, but until then, the remaining older generations of survivors of the camps, and forced exile, will never forget, or forgive. My mother lost most of her extended family to the Germans, in the camps. END

Given that the logo of the current Bundeswehr is this.


1024px-Logo_of_the_Bundeswehr.svg.png


And this logo is seen all over Europe and nobody appears to be crying or kicking off, is to suggest that your argument fails at the first hurdle.
 
. . . acksherly, the quote should be:

'Always carry a firearm east of Aldgate, Watson.'

though that is a bit of a fib as it first appeared in 'The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes (1991)'.
Before that it was West London where he thought Watson should be armed. From the 6 Napoleons, Return of Sherlock Holmes,

"And the next stage?"

"Is a very simple one. I shall go down with Hill to the Italian quarter, find the man whose photograph we have got, and arrest him on the charge of murder. Will you come with us?"

"I think not. I fancy we can attain our end in a simpler way. I can't say for certain, because it all depends -- well, it all depends upon a factor which is completely outside our control. But I have great hopes -- in fact, the betting is exactly two to one -- that if you will come with us to-night I shall be able to help you to lay him by the heels."

"In the Italian quarter?"

"No; I fancy Chiswick is an address which is more likely to find him. If you will come with me to Chiswick to-night, Lestrade, I'll promise to go to the Italian quarter with you to-morrow, and no harm will be done by the delay. And now I think that a few hours' sleep would do us all good, for I do not propose to leave before eleven o'clock, and it is unlikely that we shall be back before morning. You'll dine with us, Lestrade, and then you are welcome to the sofa until it is time for us to start. In the meantime, Watson, I should be glad if you would ring for an express messenger, for I have a letter to send, and it is important that it should go at once."

Holmes spent the evening in rummaging among the files of the old daily papers with which one of our lumber-rooms was packed. When at last he descended it was with triumph in his eyes, but he said nothing to either of us as to the result of his researches. For my own part, I had followed step by step the methods by which he had traced the various windings of this complex case, and, though I could not yet perceive the goal which we would reach, I understood clearly that Holmes expected this grotesque criminal to make an attempt upon the two remaining busts, one of which, I remembered, was at Chiswick. No doubt the object of our journey was to catch him in the very act, and I could not but admire the cunning with which my friend had inserted a wrong clue in the evening paper, so as to give the fellow the idea that he could continue his scheme with impunity. I was not surprised when Holmes suggested that I should take my revolver with me. He had himself picked up the loaded hunting-crop which was his favourite weapon."
 
Ex squaddies of opposing sides have a common theme, they at one stage in their young lives tried to kill each other, and now have a respect for each others soldering skills. Civilians who had to endure bombings, and in the occupied country's, see their family members forcibly enslaved, shot, and made homeless have long memory's, my mother was bombed out, twice, an uncle was caught and tortured,.

Any ex squaddies in civvies who have an iron cross on his lapel is going to draw attention to themselves, mostly from people like my mother, and her generation, who had to endure the war years. The good folk of the old east end, and contrary to popular thinking, there are still many who haven't moved away, have long memories. As do the same generation of the many countries that the Germans enslaved.

Today after 75 years of relative peace, comedians still make mention in their act of the Germans, what they done is beyond comprehension and human understanding, and so memories persist, only when my parents, both still alive have all gone, perhaps the stories, newsreel films and documentary's on TV will be perceived in a more tolerable light, but until then, the remaining older generations of survivors of the camps, and forced exile, will never forget, or forgive. My mother lost most of her extended family to the Germans, in the camps. END
I think the point here is that the Bundeswehr, was never institution that was wanted wholeheartedly, moreover the grundgeztz had limitations on it's use in hostile situations and that hand't gone away even after Unification. In effect those called up for National service during the period 55-90, did nothing that would warrant such an award as a general rule. That was not because they weren't prepared to, it was because they were prevented from doing so. But Nato did sanction the use of the Iron cross on German weapons. Frankly if Germany wants to thank their servicemen for their service that's a matter for them. It would be like the Pin we have. Mines in a box and stays there.
My mother lost her father in war he didn't want anything to do with and was always in trouble trying to be humane.
 
I think the point here is that the Bundeswehr, was never institution that was wanted wholeheartedly, moreover the grundgeztz had limitations on it's use in hostile situations and that hand't gone away even after Unification. In effect those called up for National service during the period 55-90, did nothing that would warrant such an award as a general rule. That was not because they weren't prepared to, it was because they were prevented from doing so. But Nato did sanction the use of the Iron cross on German weapons. Frankly if Germany wants to thank their servicemen for their service that's a matter for them. It would be like the Pin we have. Mines in a box and stays there.
My mother lost her father in war he didn't want anything to do with and was always in trouble trying to be humane.

As a matter of interest, what did your German family side do in the war?
 
My neighbours were an elderly couple who were on either side of the war.

He was a Lancaster pilot and she was FLAK crew in Berlin, so quite possibly were on occasion in direct conflict.

She was captured at the fall of Berlin, but luckily for her the sector went from Russian to Brit control, from where she was interned whilst her future husband and the other German speakers singled out the war criminals.

I've no doubt that their 'domestics' took on some interesting dynamics.
 

BuggerAll

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
It's more stylish than the UK Veteran's badge.
 

Ursus Major

Clanker
My neighbours were an elderly couple who were on either side of the war.

He was a Lancaster pilot and she was FLAK crew in Berlin, so quite possibly were on occasion in direct conflict.

She was captured at the fall of Berlin, but luckily for her the sector went from Russian to Brit control, from where she was interned whilst her future husband and the other German speakers singled out the war criminals.

I've no doubt that their 'domestics' took on some interesting dynamics.
She threw things and he dodged them?
 
What a load of cr4p!

Firstly, why on earth would a group of BW veterans go off into a neighbouring country wearing their veterans' badges? Ridiculous.

Secondly, are you at all aware that there are regular detachments of German troops in other NATO countries, including UK, and they are not regularly running into any trouble other than of the 'scrotes will be scrotes' kind?

Thirdly, do you know that there are uniformed Germans regularly travelling into countries that were involved in WW2, to tend the graves of their fallen forefathers? They are treated with the same respect afforded everyone else.

Fourthly, is it news to you that Germany has joint military formations with many of its neighbours? Euro Corps and the Franco-German Brigade, 1st German Netherlands Corps with...err...the Netherlands and Multi-National Division North East with the Poles and Baltic states.

Fifthly, my father was in the 8th Army. After the war he was a member of the 8th Army association and they used to meet up for big p1ss-ups every now and again. One year they were invited to Frankfurt by the mayor, Manfred Rommel son of Erwin, where they had a big p1ss-up with many of their erstwhile enemies. And a jolly good time they had too.

Sixthly, don't be a kn0b! Get over the war you throbber!
I absolutely agree with this. Most of Germany's neighbours simply don't like Germans because they are largely noisy, pushy bastards who haven't a clue what a queue is or what it's for. ;)

On a more serious note, the last time I was in Zurich, I was told there was some disquiet that the level of German immigration was so high that they felt that their dialect was being diluted. Although, it's fair to say that this is reported in Bern with a high degree of schadenfreude.
 
I absolutely agree with this. Most of Germany's neighbours simply don't like Germans because they are largely noisy, pushy bastards who haven't a clue what a queue is or what it's for. ;)

On a more serious note, the last time I was in Zurich, I was told there was some disquiet that the level of German immigration was so high that they felt that their dialect was being diluted. Although, it's fair to say that this is reported in Bern with a high degree of schadenfreude.

Do the Germans have a word for schadenfreude?
 

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