The Brexit Consequences Thread

#43
Bitter stars line up to tweet abuse at 'ill-informed' public

A load of luvvies are upset. Because the 'plebs' didn't do as they were told but the luvvies did.

They understand you see. High IQs are a sign of a luvvy.

Hopefully they'll all p*ss off.

On an alternate note, why all the doom and gloom? The game is a foot. Hardly Dunkirk spirit at the moment is it?
I see that by "stars" the article refers to the likes of has been wendy baller and BBC gravy train rider Lineker and a list of other washed up warblers and "comedians" like Izard who think their opinions matter more than anyone else's. I'm happy to have disappointed them.
 
#45
I'm one of many (more a million?) working in the EU. last week I had a secure job, paid for home and secure benefits . My pension years were up to the necessary 35 as my contributions from working in England, Spain and Slovakia were to be combined under EU regulations. Today we have a very uncertain future. My point? moving to other countries for work was a two way process.
 
B

Baldricks Batman

Guest
#46
I'm one of many (more a million?) working in the EU. last week I had a secure job, paid for home and secure benefits . My pension years were up to the necessary 35 as my contributions from working in England, Spain and Slovakia were to be combined under EU regulations. Today we have a very uncertain future. My point? moving to other countries for work was a two way process.
Rubbish we are not going to deport the residence of the second largest city of France ie London and we unfortunately won't be deporting x million eastern Europeans. You will be fine. This was a vote were the people of Britain recognised that Brussels is a proxy for the German government and soon others will see this too.
 
#47
Latvian Civil Service were recalled to work through their holidays: impact on Latvian Government revenues, migration flows and drawing up negotiation position.

The thoughts are that they will have to be strong in negotiations - extract concessions from the UK Govt in future negotiations and not follow the German lead. One thought is that they will fight for Child Benefit to be paid to Latvian children in Latvia!

Secondly, a tiny MS is mobilising it's Civil Service to create an immediate position - they are not waiting for October.

This impacts the UK in therefore not having enough time to prepare position let alone, begin to disengage with all the laws and treaties which will be needed.

I would be very interested to know what other European Arrsers are picking up in their home country press, and the impact it will have on the UK.

Ireland is extremely concerned about trade - the UK being the biggest trading partner.

They are also very concerned about the border as it's the only land border between the UK and the EU.

The general consensus is that the common travel area will continue to function, one way or another.
 
#48
A near 50/50 split isn't really a victory. It's just a division. That will bite with some people but the reality is that those whinging wouldn't be baying for a second count if the vote had been so close but in their favour.

The presumption of many is that if we had a cooling-off period or another vote there'd be a collective 'Oh f**k!' moment and this 'wrong' vote would correct itself. That's not necessarily the case - I used the word 'presumption' rather than 'assumption' really quite deliberately.

I've come away from this all feeling really quite flat. A friend called me from overseas yesterday and asked how I felt. My response was neither victorious nor magnanimous. I am concerned, certainly, but I would also have been concerned by a remain vote - because the EU as is simply cannot continue. It is bloated and underperforming in relative terms, and currently the solution to many of the glaring structural issues is to ignore them. My feeling is that even with a remain victory, the EU would be gone within a decade because of issues in addition to immigration.

A lot of people might gloat over that. I don't. In many respects we are stronger together. There were sound reasons for the formation of a Common Market and they are still relevant. However, politicians', especially unelected politicians', hubris cannot go unchecked. People can talk about the fig leaf of sovereignty but we've also called emperor's new clothes on this. We've blown away the conceit of 'once you're, you're in'. That is not democracy - any more than a German minister threatening other countries not to follow our example, or calls for rule changes to prevent referenda.

At this stage, I don't think anyone can predict what will happen. Okay, so we've seen the currency hit. That was inevitable - trust me, it was always going to happen. The surprise is that people were even surprised. There will be a bounce.

The most I think anyone can say is that we will be the catalyst for something. Better or worse depends on individuals' points of view. Perhaps a better way to look at it is to consider that we will trigger a correction of some sort. Things will settle and a correction was, is sorely needed.

There won't be a Kristallnacht. People won't be burnt out of homes and chased into the sea. We're not savages. The 'far Right' did not win yesterday, despite the hysterical proclamations of some. The effects of all this will, I think, be far less dramatic than many fear or have claimed. I don't see an immediate, inevitable diminution of workers' rights, for instance. Any attempt to get away with that would last only as far as a swing vote at the next election. The same can be said for environmental legislation, etc. - we may in any case be required to retain many of these things in order to remain a trading partner with the EU. Some of the fears are absurd.

It's a new day. There'll be another to follow today, and another to follow that. And that, really, is that.
 
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rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#50
I disagree.

Judging by some of the comments here (and on social media), when it all goes wrong it will simply be blamed on Cameron, bankers, the media, and probably even the EU.

Nothing to do with the inevitable consequences of such a massive decision in a globalised economy, of course.



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Jeremy's argument was the backlash against the political class would be massive and I'm knclined to agree. But you are right, as observed on this site, blame for the falling pound and stock market has been placed on Cameron and Carney et al for talking our economy down, when in reality it's a direct market response to the democratic vote which, imo, is the most outstanding examples of economic and political self harm I have ever witnessed. There is a massive disconnect between voters awareness of their actions and reality.

On another point, socual media is reporting, anecdotally, that the racist knuckledragging elements of our society feels their views have been vindicated and have become emboldened, many people from ethnic minorities have been reporting a rise in racust, chuck them out deport them style encounters. This is another deeply worrying consequence of the vote.

Thus analysis is quite interesting mind


Need to get link for full report.
 
#52
France suggest moving the UK's border back onto UK soil, meaning the migrant camp in Calais would be moved from France to the UK.

As the UK currently conduct border control operations in Calais, post EU exit, France no longer have to allow that.

Makes the task of crossing the channel as a migrant much easier.

EU Brexit referendum: France's Calais seeks border deal changes - BBC News
How would that work? We are an island, they would have to get here first. Sticking them onto the first boat back to France should fix that.
 
#55
They would have to actually come to the UK before they could be turned around and would need to be fed, watered, etc... while they were processed to determine if they could stay or not, so the camps would be in dover or folkstone probably.​
 
#57
How would that work? We are an island, they would have to get here first. Sticking them onto the first boat back to France should fix that.
Well the French will have a view about that and I'm not sure that sticking them back on a boat to France will work. The reality is that French are hardly going to accept them back once they have left their shores.

The only way to stop them would be to put the responsibility on the ferry companies to check the status of their passengers and make them responsible for any illegal passengers. A massive fine on the ferry company for each individual who made it to the UK may work.

At the very least, the fine would pay for the upkeep of the individual until they had exhausted their legal application and if they failed to win refugee status, it would also pay for their flight back to wherever.

Don't expect the French to make it easy by just accepting back off the boats anybody that we want them to though. That's just plain daft to think that they would.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#58
They would have to actually come to the UK before they could be turned around and would need to be fed, watered, etc... while they were processed to determine if they could stay or not, so the camps would be in dover or folkstone probably.​

And how prey tell, do they reach these shores in the first place, crossing a highly policed piece of well covered sea is not exactly the same as the vast uncontrolled stretches of the Med?

You are aware that the Channel is already one of the most highly monitored bits of water in the world due to the already high volumes of traffic in it?
 
#59
They would have to actually come to the UK before they could be turned around and would need to be fed, watered, etc... while they were processed to determine if they could stay or not, so the camps would be in dover or folkstone probably.​
Or they could just be denied access immediately and sent back to the safe country that they came from, immediately. I'm sure that most of us have seen it happen at ports and airports in the past.
 
#60
They would have to actually come to the UK before they could be turned around and would need to be fed, watered, etc... while they were processed to determine if they could stay or not, so the camps would be in dover or folkstone probably.​
Just how would they get to the UK, they are illegal immigrants, they in most cases have no documentation i.e passports and with out a passport or visa your not getting on a train or ferry. If they were to try and cross the channel thats another matter.
 

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