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The Brexit Consequences Thread

Read the article again. It is not written by the EU but by an economist in Paris.

(Georges Nurdin, MSc., MBA, Ph.D, FinstD, studied international business, management and economics in Oxford (UK), Paris (France), Berlin (Germany) and in the USA. For over 20 years he held global divisional CFO, CEO and Director positions in leading American and European multinational corporations, including GE, Du Pont de Nemours, L&G-Siemens and Valéo. His extensive international experience spans Europe, Russia, the Middle East, Africa, the Americas and Asia.)
For the last ten years Dr Nurdin has advised private and public sector boards and international organisations on international business, economics, trade and cross cultural management.)

If he says the UK negotiated it all very well then I think I would take his word for it, especially with his experience of international business and negotiating.
And yours?
"And yours?"

Potatoes!
 
Why are our politicians stupid enough to say things like "This will be the easiest deal ever" or "We will spend an extra £250 million on the NHS"?

If only they would learn to use the word COULD, it might save them from being misquoted all the time...
 
Why are our politicians stupid enough to say things like "This will be the easiest deal ever" or "We will spend an extra £250 million on the NHS"?

If only they would learn to use the word COULD, it might save them from being misquoted all the time...
Ahem! SHOULD
 
Why are our politicians stupid enough to say things like "This will be the easiest deal ever" or "We will spend an extra £250 million on the NHS"?

If only they would learn to use the word COULD, it might save them from being misquoted all the time...
They weren’t expecting such an active 5th column trying to subvert democracy.

It could’ve been a straight forward deal. But you had a serving PM actively asking a serving POTUS to threaten us. A former PM actively advising the other side. A parliament and a house of Lord that wanted to go against the democratic will of the people and a partisan civil service trying to derail things.

We also had quite a new approach in that we had an American Billionaire throwing money around in order the use the UK’s judicial system to play politics.


What have we had so far. Minor issues with fish exports to a market that’s locked down with a global pandemic, some haulage firms and exporters who haven’t prepared, some minor IT issues that pale into insignificance when you see the bigger issues we’re currently having to deal with and a lot of the chattering classes who want things to fail as they don’t want to be made to look foolish because their outlandish predictions post Brexit haven’t materialised.
 

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
Read the article again. It is not written by the EU but by an economist in Paris.

(Georges Nurdin, MSc., MBA, Ph.D, FinstD, studied international business, management and economics in Oxford (UK), Paris (France), Berlin (Germany) and in the USA. For over 20 years he held global divisional CFO, CEO and Director positions in leading American and European multinational corporations, including GE, Du Pont de Nemours, L&G-Siemens and Valéo. His extensive international experience spans Europe, Russia, the Middle East, Africa, the Americas and Asia.)
For the last ten years Dr Nurdin has advised private and public sector boards and international organisations on international business, economics, trade and cross cultural management.)

If he says the UK negotiated it all very well then I think I would take his word for it, especially with his experience of international business and negotiating.
And yours?
Immaterial. This isnt a job application. But negotiation i’ve done. Nothing financial (except pay rises) more preventing situations getting out of control.

if whoever he is says the U.K. negotiated very well, then the proof of that should be coming to fruition pretty soon.

It looks like the U.K. negotiated to the best of their abilities.

I look forward to it. Happy truckers plying their trade, Fishies getting on to everyone’s dishies. Money for the NHS, sunlit uplands that sort of thing.

I don’t doubt his qualifications, but the old line about being magnanimous in victory keeps springing to mind. Of course the Eu can afford to heap praise on our negotiating technique, hopefully those affected by it will feel the same way.
Why do you care, aren’t you safe in France.
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
Immaterial. This isnt a job application. But negotiation i’ve done. Nothing financial (except pay rises) more preventing situations getting out of control.

if whoever he is says the U.K. negotiated very well, then the proof of that should be coming to fruition pretty soon.

It looks like the U.K. negotiated to the best of their abilities.

I look forward to it. Happy truckers plying their trade, Fishies getting on to everyone’s dishies. Money for the NHS, sunlit uplands that sort of thing.

I don’t doubt his qualifications, but the old line about being magnanimous in victory keeps springing to mind. Of course the Eu can afford to heap praise on our negotiating technique, hopefully those affected by it will feel the same way.
Why do you care, aren’t you safe in France.
You forgot to mention your skill set. Do you have one, at all?
 

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
Check the Eye from his time as an unpaid minister. He makes using a coil spring as a set square seem easy.
You are trying to tell me something aren’t you? Although if the Eye is being circumspect, given its talent for getting sued, maybe you shouldn’t.
 
Read the article again. It is not written by the EU but by an economist in Paris.

(Georges Nurdin, MSc., MBA, Ph.D, FinstD, studied international business, management and economics in Oxford (UK), Paris (France), Berlin (Germany) and in the USA. For over 20 years he held global divisional CFO, CEO and Director positions in leading American and European multinational corporations, including GE, Du Pont de Nemours, L&G-Siemens and Valéo. His extensive international experience spans Europe, Russia, the Middle East, Africa, the Americas and Asia.)
For the last ten years Dr Nurdin has advised private and public sector boards and international organisations on international business, economics, trade and cross cultural management.)

If he says the UK negotiated it all very well then I think I would take his word for it, especially with his experience of international business and negotiating.
And yours?
1610723068787.png


Better with pictures that way he can understand them
 
I have said before that I have been on a four day week for about 15 years and was even paid a limp sum to go on it. It is longer hours but it is like having 52 extra days leave a year :)
My missus works at AWE. Every other Friday is a non-working Friday. Slightly longer hours to account for that 9 day fortnight, but having a regular long weekend is fab
 
1
if whoever he is says the U.K. negotiated very well, then the proof of that should be coming to fruition pretty soon.

For me it's already come to fruition. Freedom of movement has ended and we've a points based immigration system with a wage restriction. The latter is the best bit.

And this is just the cherry on the icing, Skid:

1.jpg
 

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
You have none of course.
That’s one opinion.
I’m sure there’ll be more.


As far back as December Scotland were ‘facing cuts to cod and haddock’,
‘Aggrieved by brexit deal’,
‘Drop in key fishing stocks’ and
‘Threaten Westminster over brexit deal’

Look at it from the Scots POV

I seriously doubt any one of them share Nurdins job experience. But they have a first hand view on how the Brexit negotiations went and how well they were carried out.

Where’s the Brexit benefit, where’s the sunlit uplands. You’ve got a blue passport and a load of unhappy fishermen. Yet fish, fish, fish, was all we heard.
The negotiators couldn’t even deliver that.

Not only Scotland but

Not much wonder the Europeans are happy with how we negotiated.
 

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
1


For me it's already come to fruition. Freedom of movement has ended and we've a points based immigration system with a wage restriction. The latter is the best bit.

And this is just the cherry on the icing, Skid:

View attachment 539543
Looks just like my next replacement one, only useful for internal travel. It’ll be like the old days all over again I thought all that crap about two passports were done away with.
 
We work a 4 on 4 off shift rotor. 183 days off plus annual leave which has bank holidays included in it.

So about 200 days off plus.

Downside longer shifts 11hours.

Further upside four days leave sandwiched with days off give you a 12 day break.
I simplified the shift pattern a little. We throw in a six day shift at intervals. We get a six off compensation.
What this actually achieves is that we never have a split weekend. We are off or work both days.
So for leave you can sandwich a four days leave with a six and a four off giving you a 14 off.
Probably best shift roster I have ever worked.
 
That’s one opinion.
I’m sure there’ll be more.


As far back as December Scotland were ‘facing cuts to cod and haddock’,
‘Aggrieved by brexit deal’,
‘Drop in key fishing stocks’ and
‘Threaten Westminster over brexit deal’

Look at it from the Scots POV

I seriously doubt any one of them share Nurdins job experience. But they have a first hand view on how the Brexit negotiations went and how well they were carried out.

Where’s the Brexit benefit, where’s the sunlit uplands. You’ve got a blue passport and a load of unhappy fishermen. Yet fish, fish, fish, was all we heard.
The negotiators couldn’t even deliver that.

Not only Scotland but

Not much wonder the Europeans are happy with how we negotiated.
Can you read or are you being deliberately obtuse ?
 

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