The Brexit Consequences Thread

Exactly what the EU doesn't want the UK doing - gaining competitive advantage by binning regulations and chopping taxes.
Which regulations do you think we should chop, out of curiosity? The ones to do with health (food safety standards, for instance)? The ones to do with safety (the irony being that British Standard was often higher than European)? The ones to do with animal welfare? Or is it employee protection?

I know that "red tape!" makes a great rallying cry, but what red tape? And how much of a difference is it really going to make?

And seeing that the big corporations already avoid a shedload of their taxes in this country, what will chopping the remaining taxes achieve? Especially as we're going to be spending like a matelot on shore leave just to cope with the economic impact of Covid-19?
 
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What have you heard that the rest of us haven't?
Nothing. I'm just not relentlessly optimistic about the impact of a no-deal Brexit on import duties, customs checks, and just-in-time logistics,.

Tell you what, if those proposed truck parks in Kent never see any use, I'll be chuffed to bits. I'll breathe a huge sigh of relief that there aren't queues of lorries sitting on the M20 waiting for their customs paperwork to be sorted out. If the deal means that after import duties it's still cheaper to produce gearboxes or engines in the UK than France, brilliant.

Do these things give you any cause for concern?
 
Nothing. I'm just not relentlessly optimistic about the impact of a no-deal Brexit on import duties, customs checks, and just-in-time logistics,.

Tell you what, if those proposed truck parks in Kent never see any use, I'll be chuffed to bits. I'll breathe a huge sigh of relief that there aren't queues of lorries sitting on the M20 waiting for their customs paperwork to be sorted out. If the deal means that after import duties it's still cheaper to produce gearboxes or engines in the UK than France, brilliant.

Do these things give you any cause for concern?
What do you know about Customs work beyond what you read in the press?
 
I doubt the EU will be pleased by this:



Exactly what the EU doesn't want the UK doing - gaining competitive advantage by binning regulations and chopping taxes. It'll make agreement with the EU harder to reach - which is why I suspect these stories are starting to emerge now. My gut feeling is that BoJo wants to exit on WTO terms and he's putting a potential agreement further out of reach by raising two fingers to the EU and it's demands.

And it's a path the EU can't go down itself. Tax cuts mean less revenue for the EU as an institution - and hence less bribes structural funds to hand out to further moves towards further integration. While setting up freeports across the EU will unleash a no holds bared fight to get them in the first place, followed by the inevitable problems as countries bend the rules.

Ursula von der Leyen and Michael Barnier will be spitting tacks this morning.

Wordsmith
Slight correction, it’s a path the EU thinks it can’t go down. But that only underlines another weakness. If the concern is that the Beaurocracy can’t survive, that implies that it is merely a pointless shell. If on the other hand the MS accelerate because of tax cuts then the EU will benefit.
 

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
Which regulations do you think we should chop, out of curiosity? The ones to do with health (food safety standards, for instance)? The ones to do with safety (the irony being that British Standard was often higher than European)? The ones to do with animal welfare?
The answer is simple we scrutinise the regulations line by line; keep the good and throw out the bad. It may end up that we keep 75% of the regulations we inherited from the EU, and the bin the rest. Let me give you a simple example - we can't have freeports while adhering the EU regulations.

Mr Sunak has said that while freeports are a "no-brainer" for the UK, of 3,500 in the rest of the world, none operate in the UK as a result of the restrictions of the EU's single market and customs union.
So 3,500 freeports in the rest of the world - and none in the EU. But soon to be 10 in the UK after we exit the EU. Those freeports are prevalent in the rest of the world - because countries with them see them as conferring a business benefit.

You really do see things in terms of EU good/Brexit bad, don't you? Please try to avoid emulating the sheep in Animal Farm by keep bleating it.

And seeing that the big corporations already avoid a shedload of their taxes in this country, what will chopping the remaining tax achieve? Especially as we're going to be spending like a matelot on shore leave just to cope with the economic impact of Covid-19?
Let me explain. The UK has a high level of tax avoidance because it has a massively complex tax system - largely initiated by Gordon Brown who trebled the size of the regulations. What you systemically do is simplify the tax regulations, so there is less scope for avoidance. And you simultaneously lower the tax rates in order to reward companies that don't resort to aggressive tax avoidance schemes.

How about posting something constructive for once instead of continually bleating about Brexit?

Wordsmith
 
What do you know about Customs work beyond what you read in the press?
Nothing, and I'm quite happy to admit it. And I understand that you know far more.

So obviously, I'm going to be rather more comforted if you can tell me that you aren't in the least worried about the impact of Brexit on cross-channel logistics.

So please, reassure me.
 
Nothing, and I'm quite happy to admit it. And I understand that you know far more.

So obviously, I'm going to be rather more comforted if you can tell me that you aren't in the least worried about the impact of Brexit on cross-channel logistics.

So please, reassure me.
Why should he reassure you? Are you that fragile you need an anonymous person on the internet tucking you up in bed saying it will be all right?
 
You really do see things in terms of EU good/Brexit bad, don't you? Please try to avoid emulating the sheep in animal Farm buy keep bleating it.
No, I don't see it in those terms. I worry about the competence of our current Government to deliver what they promised, particularly given the way they've handled Covid-19 in terms of "best outcome for the most people". As a result, when they insist that they've got it all in hand (just as they did this January), I've got an increased level of skepticism.

And funnily enough, I try to talk about it without insulting people. I explain why I have worries, and I'm more than happy to admit the areas where I'm ignorant. Note also that the sheep in Animal Farm are the ones who change their tune according to the Dear Leader's whims; I'd say that I've been reasonably consistent throughout.

How about posting something constructive for once instead of continually bleating about Brexit?
So... only good news is allowed? Fine. Tell me something constructive. Reassure me that Brexit is (on average) going to leave us on the upside. Give us another good example.

Bringing back free ports (we had them until the 1990s - Tilbury, Liverpool, Prestwick, etc) might be a good idea - but it's not a given.

Why should he reassure you? Are you that fragile you need an anonymous person on the internet tucking you up in bed saying it will be all right?
I'd prefer people explain why I'm wrong, than just doling out insults?

After all, when I discover I'm wrong, I change my mind. What do you do?
 
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Which regulations do you think we should chop, out of curiosity? The ones to do with health (food safety standards, for instance)? The ones to do with safety (the irony being that British Standard was often higher than European)? The ones to do with animal welfare? Or is it employee protection?

I know that "red tape!" makes a great rallying cry, but what red tape?

And seeing that the big corporations already avoid a shedload of their taxes in this country, what will chopping the remaining tax achieve? Especially as we're going to be spending like a matelot on shore leave just to cope with the economic impact of Covid-19?
You really are as daft as you make out.
For an answer to your hysterical ramblings, please see 2016.

Let me give you just one example of ridiculous 'red tape' the EU have thrust upon us, that narks me greatly.
Filter Coffee Makers. We are no longer allowed to import or manufacture coffee makers that stay on after a certain length of time. My new one is 20 minutes after brewing.
This presumably follows the spate of well publicised exploding coffee makers in 1995.
I bought a great Moulinex coffee machine in the nineties which stays on and has boil dry function which means if it boils dry, it cuts the electricity supply. I bought it in Belgium, funnily enough. It stays on for as long as there is coffee in the pot and I am swigging it.
I can't count the number of times the new one has nearly been launched across the Lake District when I went back for a top up after 30 minutes to a lukewarm brew. That's the EU, that is.
Absolutely no requirement to bring in that regulation other than someone going for the tick in the box, "Look what I have done"
It might sound petty but this is one of a million unnecessary regulations which do not stand up to scrutiny but were waived through by some foreigner.

And the clincher to your adolescent argument, what makes you think that we are going to accept lower standards?

Cutting regulations that allow lower standards within the EU (with me so far @Gravelbelly ) and installing our standards in new regulations that are BETTER (capital letters just for you @Gravelbelly) will surely be an achievement of Brexit?
The exact opposite of what you remain voting people are suggesting.

Apologies to arse for the rant, even though I am probably wasting my time explaining facts to @Gravelbelly
 
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Nothing. I'm just not relentlessly optimistic about the impact of a no-deal Brexit on import duties, customs checks, and just-in-time logistics,.

Tell you what, if those proposed truck parks in Kent never see any use, I'll be chuffed to bits. I'll breathe a huge sigh of relief that there aren't queues of lorries sitting on the M20 waiting for their customs paperwork to be sorted out. If the deal means that after import duties it's still cheaper to produce gearboxes or engines in the UK than France, brilliant.

Do these things give you any cause for concern?
What import duties specifically are you worried about? How many gearbox manufacturers do we have here and have you heard of COW? Clearance on wheels. We have undertaken to guarantee Community Transit that means effectively no change in the immediate future.
to explain this, the EU will no longer be collecting our taxes at the point of EUropean import. Therefore anything for us is T1 status at the point of import in Europe.
All this means is that U.K. bound goods are not in Free circulation and cannot be sold in Europe without taxes in the EU. since that is not expected of U.K. goods bound here this is not a problem .
This does not prevent agents making entry to HMRC before the goods arrive. In principle Entries will show exactly what they show now.
now as I recall Lenham ICD was just down the road from Ashford, 1or 2 junctions. Whether it is still there I don’t know. Ashford would be ideal for stacking in the event of the usual French hols and any clearances for ROI that require attention could be done there, plus it would ensure the M20 is kept clear. So please do breathe,it’s relatively essential.
 
No, I don't see it in those terms. I worry about the competence of our current Government to deliver what they promised, particularly given the way they've handled Covid-19 in terms of "best outcome for the most people". As a result, when they insist that they've got it all in hand (just as they did this January), I've got an increased level of skepticism.

And funnily enough, I try to talk about it without insulting people. I explain why I have worries, and I'm more than happy to admit the areas where I'm ignorant. Note also that the sheep in Animal Farm are the ones who change their tune according to the Dear Leader's whims; I'd say that I've been reasonably consistent throughout.



So... only good news is allowed? Fine. Tell me something constructive. Reassure me that Brexit is (on average) going to leave us on the upside. Give us another good example.



I'd prefer people explain why I'm wrong, than just doling out insults?

After all, when I discover I'm wrong, I change my mind. What do you do?
Apparently you just keep on perma sending, you are asking a person on the internet to reassure you, from your previous posts through out this site, you seem to be an expert in small arms, tactics, yet never ever deployed.

So why do you need a anonymous person to reassure you? Do You ask this of everything you find emotional?
 
The answer is simple we scrutinise the regulations line by line; keep the good and throw out the bad. It may end up that we keep 75% of the regulations we inherited from the EU, and the bin the rest. Let me give you a simple example - we can't have freeports while adhering the EU regulations.



So 3,500 freeports in the rest of the world - and none in the EU. But soon to be 10 in the UK after we exit the EU. Those freeports are prevalent in the rest of the world - because countries with them see them as conferring a business benefit.

You really do see things in terms of EU good/Brexit bad, don't you? Please try to avoid emulating the sheep in Animal Farm by keep bleating it.



Let me explain. The UK has a high level of tax avoidance because it has a massively complex tax system - largely initiated by Gordon Brown who trebled the size of the regulations. What you systemically do is simplify the tax regulations, so there is less scope for avoidance. And you simultaneously lower the tax rates in order to reward companies that don't resort to aggressive tax avoidance schemes.

How about posting something constructive for once instead of continually bleating about Brexit?

Wordsmith
Haven't we been here before, explaining facts to the simpletons?
 

tgo

War Hero
I'd never heard of Freeports until I read it here, but Wikipedia seems to list a fair few in the EU, if this is the case why has the UK none already?


edit: looking further there's some listed in the UK to, maybe Wikipedia doesn't define freeports quite right.
 

Mrs Slocombe

Old-Salt
Filter Coffee Makers. We are no longer allowed to import or manufacture coffee makers that stay on after a certain length of time.
If there is such a thing, and I can't be bothered to look it up, it won't outlaw your existing coffee maker or the use thereof. And if you like to drink coffee that's been stewing for over twenty minutes, then I think you have other issues.
 
If there is such a thing, and I can't be bothered to look it up, it won't outlaw your existing coffee maker or the use thereof. And if you like to drink coffee that's been stewing for over twenty minutes, then I think you have other issues.
I get that I don't have to bin my existing coffee maker, I'm not a remain voter ffs!
I have my proper pre 1990's machine at home but had to buy this shiit new one for the cottage!
Coffee stews just fine and tastes as good hours later.
If you get confused between stewing coffee and stewing tea, try a horlicks and off you pop to bed, citizen.
 
The UK does. Read your link.
The above.
When you really don't understand the world and should surrender your car keys to a responsible adult.
From the same source the troll @Brotherton Lad gets his info.

"A 2005 paper from a UN body said: “The [European] Commission does allow the establishment of free zones within its territory but its definition of free zone is a very narrow one.” "

 
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