The Boneyard.USAF storage facility

#2
I did find it quite impressive as well....more mothballed planes there than we have active I would think.

S_R
 

maguire

LE
Book Reviewer
#4
does make you think though... how much do you reckon the septics would charge for half a dozen reconditioned B-52s for a re-enactment of the Black Buck flights down south? they could do the whole thing on one fill up from Ascension. bet the Argentinian government would wind their neck in quick style. ;)
 
#6
walt_of_the_walts said:
I understand that the bombers are also laid out there for verification of SALT treaties. Russian and Chinese satellites overfly and make sure they are still there regularly.
Correct.

For many years the surviving B-52E and F models were kept here and used as bargaining chips in various arms treaties before being finally scrapped in the early 1990s.These jets were obselete even in the 1970s.
 

maguire

LE
Book Reviewer
#7
Le_addeur_noir said:
walt_of_the_walts said:
I understand that the bombers are also laid out there for verification of SALT treaties. Russian and Chinese satellites overfly and make sure they are still there regularly.
Correct.

For many years the surviving B-52E and F models were kept here and used as bargaining chips in various arms treaties before being finally scrapped in the early 1990s.These jets were obselete even in the 1970s.
do you think? they gave North Vietnam a good shoeing in 1972... and I was under the impression they had a pretty good (Soviet supplied) air defense system.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
#8
There was a programme on TV not so long ago showing the scrapping of just ONE large aircraft (DC10 I think). Just doing that one was a monster job but there was obviously serious money to be made by doing it including meticulous separation of all sorts of non-ferrous metals.

Back in 1959 I had the misfortune to have to lodge at RNAS Abbotsinch for a few weeks which was where FAA aircraft came to die (not my part of ship, I was watching some Glaswegians trying not to finish building a ship and enriching themselves by stealing newly-installed fittings). Always wondered what happened to those planes. the place is now Glasgow airport.
 
#9
There is another US aircraft graveyard IIRC - but for civvie aircraft. I think it is even bigger!

Humidity is below 40% in these deserts so the aircraft don't rot - but they have to be covered because the sunlight gets them!

I can't work out why they aren't scrapped and recycled. A couple of hundred tons of aircraft quality aluminium must be worth lots of money??? Can't a couple of REME metalsmiths set up a reclamation business?

Litotes
 
#10
Litotes said:
Can't a couple of REME metalsmiths set up a reclamation business?

Litotes
Not this time of year.

Spring seems to be in the air, so they're all too busy building barbeque stands.
 
#11
"
I can't work out why they aren't scrapped and recycled. A couple of hundred tons of aircraft quality aluminium must be worth lots of money??? Can't a couple of REME metalsmiths set up a reclamation business£

A lot of the planes there are types still in service, so they will be used to reclaim spare parts and in extremis put an airframe back into service. Once the type goes out of service then they are usually scrapped.
 
#12
mistersoft said:
Litotes said:
Can't a couple of REME metalsmiths set up a reclamation business?

Litotes
Not this time of year.

Spring seems to be in the air, so they're all too busy building barbeque stands.
Silly me, of course they are.

Mind you, I wouldn't have been surprised had you told me that the trade no longer existed....

:D

Litotes
 
#13
jim30 said:
"
I can't work out why they aren't scrapped and recycled. A couple of hundred tons of aircraft quality aluminium must be worth lots of money??? Can't a couple of REME metalsmiths set up a reclamation business£

A lot of the planes there are types still in service, so they will be used to reclaim spare parts and in extremis put an airframe back into service. Once the type goes out of service then they are usually scrapped.
You mean like we did before General Sam Cowan appeared on the scene?

Litotes
 
#14
I have been there, you can go on a tour with a guide. It also has an old space shuttle moth balled! Really good day (especially around the Camp of David Montham Airfield).
 
#16
Litotes said:
mistersoft said:
Litotes said:
Can't a couple of REME metalsmiths set up a reclamation business?

Litotes
Not this time of year.

Spring seems to be in the air, so they're all too busy building barbeque stands.
Silly me, of course they are.

Mind you, I wouldn't have been surprised had you told me that the trade no longer existed....

:D


Litotes
Not as surprised as I am. Do you mean people have to BUY their wrought iron gates now?
 
#17
blobmeister said:
I have been there, you can go on a tour with a guide. It also has an old space shuttle moth balled! Really good day (especially around the Camp of David Montham Airfield).
Me too,it's amazing to see all the F-15/F-16's ect being returned to service from sitting out there for years.
The dry arid conditions are apparently ideal for storingt aircraft.
 
#18
I can't help thinking that, if the British Army was running that site, a few of the less obvious planes parked at the back would be illegally sold for scrap and be replaced by plywood dummies.
 
#19
Le_addeur_noir said:
For many years the surviving B-52E and F models were kept here and used as bargaining chips in various arms treaties before being finally scrapped in the early 1990s.These jets were obselete even in the 1970s.
IIRC Rolls Royce were bidding to supply new engines to keep the existing fleet flying for a long time to come. The B52 fleet has been undergone some serious upgrades in the last 40 years.
 
#20
GoodIdeaAtTheTime said:
Le_addeur_noir said:
For many years the surviving B-52E and F models were kept here and used as bargaining chips in various arms treaties before being finally scrapped in the early 1990s.These jets were obselete even in the 1970s.
IIRC Rolls Royce were bidding to supply new engines to keep the existing fleet flying for a long time to come. The B52 fleet has been undergone some serious upgrades in the last 40 years.
The B52 simply will not die. There are plans to re-engine them with 4 RR Turbo-fans and keep them operating until 2050! However, I would have thought that UAAVs would make them obsolete long before that.

Already there are the grandchildren of original B52 pilots flying them today. If they carry on flying to 2050, 4 to 5 generations of pilots will have flown them!
 

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