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The Biden Presidency

Biden's energy plan is tightly linked to job creation so he at least recognizes need to create jobs as he tries to implement his energy plan. The main problem he is going to face is that the GOP has rediscovered the dangers of deficit spending now that Trump is gone so it's going to take some carefully negotiations. Creating construction jobs is something that benefits all states so hopefully they can come to some consensus.

  • Infrastructure: Create millions of good, union jobs rebuilding America’s crumbling infrastructure – from roads and bridges to green spaces and water systems to electricity grids and universal broadband – to lay a new foundation for sustainable growth, compete in the global economy, withstand the impacts of climate change, and improve public health, including access to clean air and clean water.
  • Auto Industry: Create 1 million new jobs in the American auto industry, domestic auto supply chains, and auto infrastructure, from parts to materials to electric vehicle charging stations, positioning American auto workers and manufacturers to win the 21st century; and invest in U.S. auto workers to ensure their jobs are good jobs with a choice to join a union.
  • Transit: Provide every American city with 100,000 or more residents with high-quality, zero-emissions public transportation options through flexible federal investments with strong labor protections that create good, union jobs and meet the needs of these cities – ranging from light rail networks to improving existing transit and bus lines to installing infrastructure for pedestrians and bicyclists.
  • Power Sector: Move ambitiously to generate clean, American-made electricity to achieve a carbon pollution-free power sector by 2035. This will enable us to meet the existential threat of climate change while creating millions of jobs with a choice to join a union.
  • Buildings: Upgrade 4 million buildings and weatherize 2 million homes over 4 years, creating at least 1 million good-paying jobs with a choice to join a union; and also spur the building retrofit and efficient-appliance manufacturing supply chain by funding direct cash rebates and low-cost financing to upgrade and electrify home appliances and install more efficient windows, which will cut residential energy bills.
  • Housing: Spur the construction of 1.5 million sustainable homes and housing units.
  • Innovation: Drive dramatic cost reductions in critical clean energy technologies, including battery storage, negative emissions technologies, the next generation of building materials, renewable hydrogen, and advanced nuclear – and rapidly commercialize them, ensuring that those new technologies are made in America.
  • Agriculture and Conservation: Create jobs in climate-smart agriculture, resilience, and conservation, including 250,000 jobs plugging abandoned oil and natural gas wells and reclaiming abandoned coal, hardrock, and uranium mines – providing good work with a choice to join or continue membership in a union in hard hit communities, including rural communities, reducing leakage of toxics, and preventing local environmental damage.
I do agree that infrastructure spending is something that both sides can agree upon. But what I don't agree with is the Kill jobs first and then try the SWAG job creation option after the fact. If you can't immediately transition workers into something similar without massively impacting their pay check you are not helping your cause. The Key stone decision did not have anything close to a plan to help those who will get the axe. In this case first impressions matter, and will set the tone for the cooperation or resistance his admin will receive.

This isn't the Democratic Underground sir. These are real choices that impact real people and if you don't want them to elect another Trump like figure in four years, then your party has to get their $hit together and actually do more than feck people first, then try to figure out a coherent plan after the fact. Out here in the boonies union jobs are not easy to find, and thoughts and prayers don't exactly pay a mortgage or put food on the table.
 
So, no tinfoil hat here, I'm just genuinely intrigued as to why "looking out for threats all around" didn't look like people covering arcs but was at least a couple of ranks (lets face it the rear ranks are definately not providing protection from the other direction) in formation facing away from the road...

It doesn't matter what colour of ex military you are, that looks nothing like providing protection to me, and looks like a formation facing away from the cavalcade... what do snopes & reuters know about protecting an area using troops? Jack shit is my summary and therefore more likely to accept a line of drivel from the pentagon...
 
Its not an insult; But you sound like a senator in the 5th century, still arguing for the altar of victory to be restored in Rome. Whilst the Emperor lives in Ravenna under the control of the army, that isn't even roman and the Church could preach a mob up to stop you, if you managed to get past all the checks/balances against going against the spirit of the new laws.

Authoritarian Progressivism is the only acceptable narrative today and anything else is divisive and therefore unhelpful today and criminal tommorow. Joe Biden of 1980 would probably agree with you and find a lot of common cause with Trump, but he has already been worked over and a great survivor like him thrive, because they're are chameolons and go with the flow.

In Summary:-
What scared the system so much, is Trump by accident, found the antidote to beat Gramscian logic and he ridiculed high culture attitudes and went low. That broke the system for a year or two, before they're swamped him.

Noted, but I'm arguing that's what needs to happen and what he should be setting his agenda to do.

If not, I think there will be trouble. As we have mostly argued, Trump lost as a result of his personality, not his policies. We've seen from the polls how many US voters went Democrat purely to remove the man. This emphatically did not translate to a National swing behind Progressivism.

That being the case, progressive ideas almost certainly have a natural culminating point not much further down the American road. At that point, a public push-back will begin. If the progressive response is a resort to authoritarianism, there will be an increasing public backlash, and so on. This could see a Trump successor returned with enhanced powers.

This is exactly what happened over BREXIT. Successive attempts to move in an authoritarian direction, supported by much of our National elite, but in defiance of the 2016 vote, met with a progressively more neuralgic public reaction. It culminated in an 80 seat majority for Boris Johnson. Little people may not own the airwaves, but they still have a vote.

I concede that there are some powerful imperatives in the Progressive case, but it is just that, a case. In a democracy, a case has to be argued and voted upon. It cannot be imposed, however much our elites may feel entitled to do so...
 
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bentobox

Old-Salt
So Biden has signed his first flurry of Executive Orders, one for mask mandate. God help America!

Here's a clip of Biden's signing. Take a good look as its important for what I'll be pointing out.




Now compare this to President Trump's signing of EOs.



Pay attention @0.54. Do you notice the differences?
Interestingly on the subject of masks, a recent study found that mask-wearing in many countries, like Singapore, Japan and Argentina, has reached 95 percent. In the United States it has been a comparative slog, rising from 40 percent in April to 76 percent. In Wyoming, mask-wearing remains at an abysmal 53 percent.

Source The Washington Post.
 
Interestingly on the subject of masks, a recent study found that mask-wearing in many countries, like Singapore, Japan and Argentina, has reached 95 percent. In the United States it has been a comparative slog, rising from 40 percent in April to 76 percent. In Wyoming, mask-wearing remains at an abysmal 53 percent.

Source The Washington Post.
Whisky is an acceptable substitute.
 
Interestingly on the subject of masks, a recent study found that mask-wearing in many countries, like Singapore, Japan and Argentina, has reached 95 percent. In the United States it has been a comparative slog, rising from 40 percent in April to 76 percent. In Wyoming, mask-wearing remains at an abysmal 53 percent.

Source The Washington Post.

It's Wyoming ffs, hell that lot down there can't even dress themselves in the morning let alone know what a mask is for.
 

Arse_Bandit

Old-Salt

anglo

LE
Because, one, it is a step towards slowing the damages of climate change, damage that is mainly felt by the coastal states. And two, it prevents the extractive industries from destroying the natural heritage that belongs to every citizen of the United States. Those public lands belong to all of us, and thus we have a say in how they are used. Given the glut of oil and gas in our country, why damage our environment for something we don’t need? It’s not the rest of the country’s fault your state failed to diversify its economy.

Losing any job is bad, but preventing irreparable damage to our environment trumps the loss of those jobs.

"Losing any job is bad, but preventing irreparable damage to our environment trumps the loss of those jobs."

Until it's your job that's gone
 

ABNredleg

War Hero
"Losing any job is bad, but preventing irreparable damage to our environment trumps the loss of those jobs."

Until it's your job that's gone
True. Unfortunately, sometimes you have to pick between bad and worse options. We’re going to see more issues like this as jobs in the fossil fuel industries are replaced by those dealing with renewable energies. Just as in the past, such shifts can cause much distress during the transition. Government can enact policies to alleviate the problems, but it will be messy. We experienced that in North Carolina as textile and furniture jobs went overseas and it took decades to work through the problems.
 
True. Unfortunately, sometimes you have to pick between bad and worse options. We’re going to see more issues like this as jobs in the fossil fuel industries are replaced by those dealing with renewable energies. Just as in the past, such shifts can cause much distress during the transition. Government can enact policies to alleviate the problems, but it will be messy. We experienced that in North Carolina as textile and furniture jobs went overseas and it took decades to work through the problems.
But did you personally experience that? I know two people who did and it really hurt them and those problems have not been worked through.

The problem with your theory about jobs being replaced is that they are not.
 
But did you personally experience that? I know two people who did and it really hurt them and those problems have not been worked through.

The problem with your theory about jobs being replaced is that they are not.

Brexit to blame was it?
 
Brexit to blame was it?
Not at all Sam. But my MIL and FIL were factory workers in the furniture industry and when the plants shut down they were hurt pretty badly. My wife had a not so great childhood when both her parents lost their not so glamorous but decent factory jobs. But what is annoying is that the Jumping DAGB seems to forget the real human cost when these little "course corrections", in the name of political ideology occur. The hypocritical thing about it, is that the man never experienced getting $hit canned like this and I am sure his resume would reflect that.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Meanwhile , with the Denier-In-Chief finally prised out of office, this :

Get Access

In a welcome twist that defies expectations and confuses experts, Tennessee has seen the coronavirus pandemic slow by almost every measurement this month, when most predicted a surge.

Despite this slowdown, the virus remains an ever-present threat across the state. If Tennesseans drop their guard now, they risk erasing the recent progress and returning to the worst days of the virus when hospitals were on the cusp of catastrophic overflow.

“The people of Tennessee have shown before in this pandemic that they could flatten the curve,” said Dr. David Aronoff, director of the infectious disease division at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. “I wish it did not take being the leading state in the country to change behavior, if that is what prompted a change.”

Aronoff said the reduction could already be felt at Vanderbilt, one of the largest hospitals in the state, which was still full of COVID-19 patients but slightly less packed than last month. It felt as if the hospital, and possibly the state itself, had crested a peak, he said.

Piercey, the state health commissioner, said the number of Tennesseans hospitalized by the virus may have been reduced through use of monoclonal antibodies, an emerging treatment for the coronavirus with a limited window of effectiveness.

Monoclonal antibodies are exactly what they sound like – the antibodies from someone who fought off COVID-19 are cloned by a drug company to be infused into patients. Early results from clinical trials suggest these antibodies, if provided within days of symptoms first arising, can keep infections mild and prevent hospitalizations.

More than 7,500 Tennesseans received doses of these antibodies since the federal government authorized them for emergency use in November. But thousands of doses remain available to coronavirus patients in the state, according to the Tennessee Department of Health.

"It’s like the most effective thing that nobody is talking about," Piercey said. "It's a huge advancement."


Pedestrians without masks walk past a sign encouraging mask use on Broadway in Nashville, Tenn., Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2021.


Pedestrians without masks walk past a sign encouraging mask use on Broadway in Nashville, Tenn., Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2021.

ANDREW NELLES / THE TENNESSEAN

------------------ ------------------ -------------------- ---------------------- ------------------------- ------------

A slight gleam of good news - though much tempered by experience.


" Now this is not the end. It is not even the beginning of the end. But it is, perhaps, the end of the beginning. "

[ Some ould josser, back in the day. ]
 
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It's Wyoming ffs, hell that lot down there can't even dress themselves in the morning let alone know what a mask is for.

Don't they even have a mask and some black nasty for sexual emergencies
 

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