Army Rumour Service

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

The beginning of the end for the Thai monarchy?

Weren't particularly brutal you say. Half a million to one million killed. Maybe more.

Indonesian mass killings of 1965-66
Mixing up two very different incidents there PA.

I am referring to the forced Indonezianization of the Chinese community under Sukarno and Soeharto, where Chinese-Indonesians were expected to adopt "Indonesian" names and overt displays of Chinese culture were banned. This was an ongoing process over the 1960s and 1970s and didn't involve any wide-scale violence as far as I am aware.

Your link refers to the anti-Communist purge of 1965-66. I will question your figure of 500,000 to 1 million victims, I know that is the accepted figure but in fact nobody has the slightest idea of how many people were killed and for a variety of reasons I think the actual number is closer to 100,000.

However, despite the wiki claim, this was not especially targeted against the Chinese, not even nearly. The vast and overwhelming number of victims were kampong-dwelling Javanese, Balinese and to a lesser extent Bataknese villagers, mostly killed by their Red-hating (or whipped up to hate the Reds) neighbours using pangas and any other agricultural implements that they had to hand.

The Chinese did not suffer especially heavily in those purges, despite the Indonesian Communist Party being heavily influenced by Beijing at that time.
 
Time flies. I was very surprised there's no real sign the Dutch were ever there. No signs in Dutch, and I would imagine very few Dutch speakers around.

French has a lingering presence in Indo-China, and English is everywhere in Malaysia, but not the Dutch language in Indo.
It really is quite remarkable how the Dutch influence has completely disappeared from everyday life in Indonesia, there simply is no evidence that they were ever there today.

Beyond legal terms the only lasting influence the Dutch have left on the Indonesian language is in household terms, koolkas (fridge), wastaffel (basin), hoordeng (curtains), pisspot (er, pisspot obviously), the sort of words a Dutch colonial memsahib would have needed to know in order to shout at her Indonesian servant. Even then Portuguese has had more influence on the language than the Dutch, who came, exploited, lived high on the hog, lost it pretty much overnight, and then left with barely a trace that they were there for 300 years.
 
It really is quite remarkable how the Dutch influence has completely disappeared from everyday life in Indonesia, there simply is no evidence that they were ever there today.

Beyond legal terms the only lasting influence the Dutch have left on the Indonesian language is in household terms, koolkas (fridge), wastaffel (basin), hoordeng (curtains), pisspot (er, pisspot obviously), the sort of words a Dutch colonial memsahib would have needed to know in order to shout at her Indonesian servant. Even then Portuguese has had more influence on the language than the Dutch, who came, exploited, lived high on the hog, lost it pretty much overnight, and then left with barely a trace that they were there for 300 years.
Unlike British influence then eh Mike. Look at all those grand old buildings in Dublin. Trinity college,the old barracks, Mountjoy prison etc, even the main post office was built in British times and the locals still keep in pristine condition.

Look at Singapore. They still have a statue and numerous places and buildings named after their British colonial founder. The same in Penang and other places in Malaysia. Many people there use English as a first language.
 
Unlike British influence then eh Mike. Look at all those grand old buildings in Dublin. Trinity college,the old barracks, Mountjoy prison etc, even the main post office was built in British times and the locals still keep in pristine condition.

Look at Singapore. They still have a statue and numerous places and buildings named after their British colonial founder. The same in Penang and other places in Malaysia. Many people there use English as a first language.
I agree.

Whisper it softly, but occasionally you will hear the odd Indonesian mutter about how it was that in all that vast swathe of territory from North Africa, all across the plains of Araby, along the subcontinent, down the Malay peninsula, across the sea to Australia and out beyond the great Pacific to New Zealand, the only place the bloody Brits missed out on was Indonesia.

They won't say it loudly and immediately after they will regret saying it, but they do, very occasionally, let it slip.
 
Time flies. I was very surprised there's no real sign the Dutch were ever there. No signs in Dutch, and I would imagine very few Dutch speakers around.

French has a lingering presence in Indo-China, and English is everywhere in Malaysia, but not the Dutch language in Indo.
Plenty of signs of the Dutch in Malacca in Malaysia.
 
I agree.

Whisper it softly, but occasionally you will hear the odd Indonesian mutter about how it was that in all that vast swathe of territory from North Africa, all across the plains of Araby, along the subcontinent, down the Malay peninsula, across the sea to Australia and out beyond the great Pacific to New Zealand, the only place the bloody Brits missed out on was Indonesia.

They won't say it loudly and immediately after they will regret saying it, but they do, very occasionally, let it slip.
They even changed over to driving on the left after the Dutch left.
 
They even changed over to driving on the left after the Dutch left.
Not sure about that, I think like most of SE Asia, including Thailand they always drove on the left. I have no idea why that should be. Although as anyone who has driven in Jakarta can confirm, now they drive on whatever side of the road or pavement they feel like.

 
Unlike British influence then eh Mike. Look at all those grand old buildings in Dublin. Trinity college,the old barracks, Mountjoy prison etc, even the main post office was built in British times and the locals still keep in pristine condition.

Look at Singapore. They still have a statue and numerous places and buildings named after their British colonial founder. The same in Penang and other places in Malaysia. Many people there use English as a first language.

I think English is the first language in Singapore-albeit modified into Singlish a fair bit these days.
 

Bardeyai

Old-Salt
It certainly was in peninsular Malaysia in the times I've been there from 1990 up to around 2015. It' was easy to pick up the local Bahasa Malaysia/ Indonesian out in those two countries when travelling around. Unlike Thai, at least you can read the local text.

PM (mad) Mahathir has been turning the country away from English. Their loss in later life.
When I first went to KL, in 1995, an old sweat took me to one side and explained to me - over several tigers, naturally- that Dr M’s love hate relationship with the UK went back to a kicking he had received from some squaddies in Singapore whilst a young man. So it’s all the military’s fault.
 

endure

GCM
Marching on Government House just now

Ek2O5rQUUAA18DH.jpg
 

endure

GCM
ks1.JPG
 

endure

GCM
tactic.JPG
 

endure

GCM
tacs2.JPG
 

endure

GCM
tacs3.JPG
 

endure

GCM
trash.JPG
 
Top