The BBC: are claims of political bias justified? Part 2.

Auld-Yin

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Well known management büllshit trick: if you can't solve any of the company's problems or achieve anything else: re-brand.
The BBC can get rid of thejr Brands:

Jo Brand and Russell Brand - unfunny cnuts both.
 

Dread

LE
The BBC can get rid of thejr Brands:

Jo Brand and Russell Brand - unfunny cnuts both.

Funnily enough, have a look at Russel Brand's YouTube channel: it's amusing because he's realised how badly the Dems lied about Trump (Russian involvement, Ivermectin, etc) and it's funny to watch him ripping into the lying Clinton cünts and all the previously on-side snowflakes wailing and gnashing their teeth at him.
 

Auld-Yin

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Funnily enough, have a look at Russel Brand's YouTube channel: it's amusing because he's realised how badly the Dems lied about Trump (Russian involvement, Ivermectin, etc) and it's funny to watch him ripping into the lying Clinton cünts and all the previously on-side snowflakes wailing and gnashing their teeth at him.
No thanks.
 

Site Admin

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I feel like the climate change narrative across the BBC has palpably ratcheted up across all it‘s platforms in the last 2-3 weeks to the point where it’s getting unavoidable now. When I’ve been in the car, for some reason my radio seems to default to Radio 4, it’s been mentioned numerous times as a causal or contributory factory for a variety of seemingly irreverent subjects. The website had a news story about an Iraqi traffic copper directing traffic in 50C heat. It just goes on and on…
 

Truxx

LE
I feel like the climate change narrative across the BBC has palpably ratcheted up across all it‘s platforms in the last 2-3 weeks to the point where it’s getting unavoidable now. When I’ve been in the car, for some reason my radio seems to default to Radio 4, it’s been mentioned numerous times as a causal or contributory factory for a variety of seemingly irreverent subjects. The website had a news story about an Iraqi traffic copper directing traffic in 50C heat. It just goes on and on…
Just 50 degrees??? Pah when I was there it was routinely 55 during the day. But I know what you mean with the Beeb though. Notwithstanding the upcoming COP related deluge of climate stories I recommend Beeb watchers and listeners count the number of times that they mention that UK leads the G20 field in terms of carbon reduction.

You will probably only need the fingers of one foot to keep a tally.
 
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I feel like the climate change narrative across the BBC has palpably ratcheted up across all it‘s platforms in the last 2-3 weeks to the point where it’s getting unavoidable now. When I’ve been in the car, for some reason my radio seems to default to Radio 4, it’s been mentioned numerous times as a causal or contributory factory for a variety of seemingly irreverent subjects. The website had a news story about an Iraqi traffic copper directing traffic in 50C heat. It just goes on and on…
Geography in particular, but other subjects as well the graduates are pumped full of climate change bollox and increasingly, the graduates are coming out of uni with an obsession to take the climate on and are Gaia's Jesuits.

The BBC seems to hire large numbers of graduates and for that reason alone - QED (something a BBC type would understand).
 

OneTenner

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Just 50 degrees??? Pah when I was there it was routinely 55 during the day.
Yup, same for me - funny how they go for a 'headline figure' but ignore things like historic averages. They also ignore the Geologists - not just the BBC to be fair, but the whole climate industry, for if they took the geological record into account, the narrative would be very different, more along the lines of 'here we go again, but not quite as bad as the last few times'. but that won't raise taxes or create jobs out of hot air, will it?.
 
Yup, same for me - funny how they go for a 'headline figure' but ignore things like historic averages. They also ignore the Geologists - not just the BBC to be fair, but the whole climate industry, for if they took the geological record into account, the narrative would be very different, more along the lines of 'here we go again, but not quite as bad as the last few times'. but that won't raise taxes or create jobs out of hot air, will it?.
That's because this isn't entirely a science debate and I find it astonishing how many new jobs have being created for nice middle class graduates to occupy across government and business dealing with climate change. It rather reminds me of the charity industry and how it went from some genuinely concerned bossy lady from a local church ran on a shoestring, to a multi-billionaire business, staffed by bright young things eager to tell the africans in situ how to build schools.
 
Oh dear...

You would have thought the BBC would have learned from the Liz Bonnin episode of Who Do You Think You Are in 2016...


Will the BBC now sack them because of their family links to colonialism and slavery.
Oh no.....not another...

 
As I have often said, if you go to galleries and look at "slave art" most of the "slave guards" are black. There was little to no chance that it wouldn't come back to haunt people. I assume she did the decent thing and apologised. Or has she been ostracised and held accountable for the sins of the fathers? No? Didn't think so.
 
Yup, same for me - funny how they go for a 'headline figure' but ignore things like historic averages. They also ignore the Geologists - not just the BBC to be fair, but the whole climate industry, for if they took the geological record into account, the narrative would be very different, more along the lines of 'here we go again, but not quite as bad as the last few times'. but that won't raise taxes or create jobs out of hot air, will it?.
Do you mean paleoclimatologists?

I wonder why we don't hear much from them.
 

skeetstar

Old-Salt
SLJ, although being of a dusky hue, is still a Septic so any programme on slavery must be used to deflect blame from the USA and usually on to Britain. Never mind that French, Spanish, Dutch ships were also involved in the trade and of course, as you point out, no mention of the sterling work done by Britain to stop the slave trade, including attacking US flagged ships carrying black gold.
Not dead sure of my facts here, but the Atlantic trade was some 14 million people. Of that the UK was responsible for circa 3.5 million. I don't have the number but I'm sure I read that the Portuguese took the largest number of slaves to the new world. When was the last time you heard anyone condemn the Portuguese slave trade?
 

Auld-Yin

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Not dead sure of my facts here, but the Atlantic trade was some 14 million people. Of that the UK was responsible for circa 3.5 million. I don't have the number but I'm sure I read that the Portuguese took the largest number of slaves to the new world. When was the last time you heard anyone condemn the Portuguese slave trade?
Here you go

Note that Portugal claims to be the first to ban slavery, albeit in Portugal itself.
 

skeetstar

Old-Salt
Here you go

Note that Portugal claims to be the first to ban slavery, albeit in Portugal itself.
Just looked it up, if numbers to be believed the Portuguese shipped out some 5m people and were the biggest culprits. Read your article, and yes it admits the Portuguese role, but not the scale. Britain banned domestic slavery long before Portugal did, I think in 1100s.
 
I have two, or maybe more, strongly conflicting views on organised religion, which I cannot easily reconcile.

Logically: The whole idea of organised religion is anathema to me. That a self-selecting priesthood can hold sway over large swathes of the populous with made up stories and threats of eternal damnation is reprehensible and anyone seeking such a position is a monster. I can guarantee that there has never been a single case of a god talking to a man, telling him to form a religion and explaining the tenets and details of it for a handy book. It is all made-up crap with the sole purpose of having the folk of a community behave in a way of which the leaders (political, economic and ecclesiastic) approve. Theology is the study of angels dancing on the head of a pin.

Conversely: A central and commonly held belief system is at the centre of any civilised and functioning society. It helps to ensure that almost everyone is pulling in the same direction for the common good. The loss or decline of such a system inevitably leads to the downfall of a society as a more brutal alternative, with no widespread adherence (Or even coherence), will replace it. Societies do not work better when everyone is doing their own thing. It also provides a crutch for the weak, ignorant and desperate to lean on, in order to have some purpose in their 'being'. Organised religion does this better than any other method.

The beliefs are rubbish and the priesthood (In all religions) is corrupt, but the framework of a popular religion is a benefit.
I disagree where I have Bolded.
Societies work better where everybody is allowed to pull their own way, within legal bounds.
This leads to advance whereas all pulling together except in certain times (war, cricket etc.) leads to stagnation.
 
I disagree where I have Bolded.
Societies work better where everybody is allowed to pull their own way, within legal bounds.
This leads to advance whereas all pulling together except in certain times (war, cricket etc.) leads to stagnation.
I don't entirely disagree with you, just vary by degree. When you have a society where the people believe in the 'national mission' things work so much better, even if their view of the local mission varies considerably. This is not about nationalism, it is about community spirit. For examples of this look at post-war Germany, modern day Denmark or even 1990's Czech Republic and Poland. There were variation in the level of commitment and not all the details were agreed upon, but the common cause was clear and people bought into it, palpably. Tug of war, of which I have considerable experience, is a good metaphor for this: If the team are synchronised, gird their hips, watch the coach and synchronise their pull, it is very very difficult to even budge them.

A commonly subscribed religion, with which I otherwise disagree, is a good vehicle for this when not corrupted by a scheming duplicitous priesthood.
 
I don't entirely disagree with you, just vary by degree. When you have a society where the people believe in the 'national mission' things work so much better, even if their view of the local mission varies considerably. This is not about nationalism, it is about community spirit. For examples of this look at post-war Germany, modern day Denmark or even 1990's Czech Republic and Poland. There were variation in the level of commitment and not all the details were agreed upon, but the common cause was clear and people bought into it, palpably. Tug of war, of which I have considerable experience, is a good metaphor for this: If the team are synchronised, gird their hips, watch the coach and synchronise their pull, it is very very difficult to even budge them.

A commonly subscribed religion, with which I otherwise disagree, is a good vehicle for this when not corrupted by a scheming duplicitous priesthood.
We mostly agree, except, religion exists to serve its own purpose and nothing else.
Because humans are decent in the main it can do as you say until those in power feel endangered, then it becomes stagnant and corrupt.
And both RC and CoE are good examples of this.
 

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