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The BBC: are claims of political bias justified? Part 2.

Sorry, I completely disagree; having spent a little time in former colonial Africa, as well as central Asia, the Middle East, and to a lesser extent FRY, the one constant away from the cities (and there too sometimes) is knowledge of the language of English and trust in the veracity of the BBC World Service. English is (ironically) the lingua franca of the world, and it's rare to be unable to speak our mother tongue without anyone understanding you (outside of Bradford obvs), and as said earlier the language of business and science. Indeed in the past some African countries have discouraged the speaking of pidgin as fit only for the uneducated. Most places I've been the more go-getting people spoke English, knowing it to be a way to improve themselves. For the BBC to start broadcasting in pidgin is working directly against that.

As for your comment "if the BBC only broadcast in received pronunciation, nobody would listen to it", you are wrong, as the historic popularity of the BBC World Service proves.

Edit for poor grammar (Argh).
You're entitled to your opinion.
To avoid any further misunderstanding, when I said "nobody would listen to it", I was refering to those that only understood pidgin, who wouldn't listen to English broadcasts.
IIRC, pidgen was encouraged in the colonies by the British as a way of uniting the many and varied tribal languages under a language easily picked up, rather than the full blown English. Even today, many of the tribes still use their own languages but communicate with other tribes in Pidgin where English isn't common.
 
How very interesting.

Wee Eck no longer appearing before the MSP Ctte tomorrow. BBC links this to the redacted submission, but not to the implication of the redaction which is that the evidence cannot be considered by said Ctte.

Why is that?
 

Awol

LE
BBC 1 tonight. Lucy Worsley taking a hatchet to the Blitz Spirit.

Apparently we are all wrong to think of the nation pulling together to face the evils of Nazism. In fact, London was a morass of panicking cockneys and rampant anti-semitism.

The icing on the PC cake however was that of the six individuals the programme followed, one was inevitably a black Nigerian student lawyer.

How many hundreds, maybe thousands, of potential (and much better) subjects did the producers reject until they found the one with brown skin? I have this image of a poor researcher at a cluttered desk, chucking memoir after memoir over his shoulder into a huge pile behind him, as he desperately searches for a Blitz resident who was anything but hideously white.
 
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Received this email this morning. I am assuming many others here also:



Dear 'Sexton Blake'

You recently signed the petition “Revoke the TV licence using legislation”:
Petition: Revoke the TV licence using legislation

On Monday 1 March the Petitions Committee will hold a virtual e-petition session to discuss TV licensing.

MPs will discuss the issue in light of the petition you have signed calling for the Government to revoke the TV licence using legislation. Jonathan Gullis, a Member of the Petitions Committee, will lead the debate. The Minister for Media and Data, John Whittingdale MP, will respond for the Government.

Watch live from 4.30pm on Monday 1 March:
Petitions sessions and debates are an opportunity for MPs to discuss the important issues raised by petitions, however they cannot directly change the law or result in a vote to implement the request of the petition.

This petition is being considered in an e-petition session because sittings in Westminster Hall (where e-petitions are normally debated) have been suspended as part of Parliament’s arrangements for adapting to the Coronavirus outbreak.

Thanks,
The Petitions team
UK Government and Parliament
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
Received this email this morning. I am assuming many others here also:



Dear 'Sexton Blake'

You recently signed the petition “Revoke the TV licence using legislation”:
Petition: Revoke the TV licence using legislation

On Monday 1 March the Petitions Committee will hold a virtual e-petition session to discuss TV licensing.

MPs will discuss the issue in light of the petition you have signed calling for the Government to revoke the TV licence using legislation. Jonathan Gullis, a Member of the Petitions Committee, will lead the debate. The Minister for Media and Data, John Whittingdale MP, will respond for the Government.

Watch live from 4.30pm on Monday 1 March:
Petitions sessions and debates are an opportunity for MPs to discuss the important issues raised by petitions, however they cannot directly change the law or result in a vote to implement the request of the petition.

This petition is being considered in an e-petition session because sittings in Westminster Hall (where e-petitions are normally debated) have been suspended as part of Parliament’s arrangements for adapting to the Coronavirus outbreak.

Thanks,
The Petitions team
UK Government and Parliament
#MeToo
 
Received this email this morning. I am assuming many others here also:



Dear 'Sexton Blake'

You recently signed the petition “Revoke the TV licence using legislation”:
Petition: Revoke the TV licence using legislation

On Monday 1 March the Petitions Committee will hold a virtual e-petition session to discuss TV licensing.

MPs will discuss the issue in light of the petition you have signed calling for the Government to revoke the TV licence using legislation. Jonathan Gullis, a Member of the Petitions Committee, will lead the debate. The Minister for Media and Data, John Whittingdale MP, will respond for the Government.

Watch live from 4.30pm on Monday 1 March:
Petitions sessions and debates are an opportunity for MPs to discuss the important issues raised by petitions, however they cannot directly change the law or result in a vote to implement the request of the petition.

This petition is being considered in an e-petition session because sittings in Westminster Hall (where e-petitions are normally debated) have been suspended as part of Parliament’s arrangements for adapting to the Coronavirus outbreak.

Thanks,
The Petitions team
UK Government and Parliament
Translation

We will look at this and bin it as it could harm our potential earnings when we leave politics. You were a mug for signing it and we now have your details stored as a potential agitator when we crush the plebs.
 
Translation

We will look at this and bin it as it could harm our potential earnings when we leave politics. You were a mug for signing it and we now have your details stored as a potential agitator when we crush the plebs.
Cruel but so true.
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
You're entitled to your opinion.
To avoid any further misunderstanding, when I said "nobody would listen to it", I was refering to those that only understood pidgin, who wouldn't listen to English broadcasts.
IIRC, pidgen was encouraged in the colonies by the British as a way of uniting the many and varied tribal languages under a language easily picked up, rather than the full blown English. Even today, many of the tribes still use their own languages but communicate with other tribes in Pidgin where English isn't common.
I have no doubt you're correct about British colonial encouragement of pidgin, it makes sense. From conversations I've had with locals in various sh1tholes around the world however, I believe that rather than non- English speakers switching off, the World Service in English has been a very successful global language teacher. I remember speaking with an Uzbek guide many years ago who had a very plummy accent, which he'd learnt (with the language) from the BBC, and chatting with villagers in Sierra Leone, those who could speak English had mostly learnt it from the radio, and very snobbish about it they were too!
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
I have no doubt you're correct about British colonial encouragement of pidgin, it makes sense. From conversations I've had with locals in various sh1tholes around the world however, I believe that rather than non- English speakers switching off, the World Service in English has been a very successful global language teacher. I remember speaking with an Uzbek guide many years ago who had a very plummy accent, which he'd learnt (with the language) from the BBC, and chatting with villagers in Sierra Leone, those who could speak English had mostly learnt it from the radio, and very snobbish about it they were too!
And isn't it interesting that while RP is seen by the BBC as 'elitist' it's seen and (highly) regarded as a reference point around the world.

Another example of how progressive types seem determined to smash to pieces something that works very well and which maintains our global standing.
 
And isn't it interesting that while RP is seen by the BBC as 'elitist' it's seen and (highly) regarded as a reference point around the world.

Another example of how progressive types seem determined to smash to pieces something that works very well and which maintains our global standing.
When they introduced regional accents into the Cambridge English oral exams, my wife’s Italian students were seriously at a loss.
They listened to her (RP born and bred) and, more importantly, World Service.
Trying to decipher heavy-duty Jockinese or , pace @AlienFTM and others, in broad Geordie, the students had real problems.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
I have no doubt you're correct about British colonial encouragement of pidgin, it makes sense. From conversations I've had with locals in various sh1tholes around the world however, I believe that rather than non- English speakers switching off, the World Service in English has been a very successful global language teacher. I remember speaking with an Uzbek guide many years ago who had a very plummy accent, which he'd learnt (with the language) from the BBC, and chatting with villagers in Sierra Leone, those who could speak English had mostly learnt it from the radio, and very snobbish about it they were too!
I have to post this.

 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
When they introduced regional accents into the Cambridge English oral exams, my wife’s Italian students were seriously at a loss.
They listened to her (RP born and bred) and, more importantly, World Service.
Trying to decipher heavy-duty Jockinese or , pace @AlienFTM and others, in broad Geordie, the students had real problems.
And, again, what is this meant to achieve? If you were doing the same to English students with, say, German you wouldn't, for instance, throw in a very very strong Bavarian accent - you'd use something more 'standard'.

Bear in mind this chap, whose appointment raised outrage and who, it was postulated, was put on radio to confound German attempts to understand him:
...as to broad Geordie, I'm not sure if you remember me fresh down from the North-East but a couple of years back I was shooting up at Ponteland. The number of 'local' accents on the firing point matched the number of people there, and some needed concentration even from those who were other locals; it's still common up there for accents to vary from village to village (don't ever go to Birtley... sorry, 'Bortlee').

Pushing back against elitism reduces and even removes what communication should be about: comprehension.
 
Received this email this morning. I am assuming many others here also:



Dear 'Sexton Blake'

You recently signed the petition “Revoke the TV licence using legislation”:
Petition: Revoke the TV licence using legislation

On Monday 1 March the Petitions Committee will hold a virtual e-petition session to discuss TV licensing.

MPs will discuss the issue in light of the petition you have signed calling for the Government to revoke the TV licence using legislation. Jonathan Gullis, a Member of the Petitions Committee, will lead the debate. The Minister for Media and Data, John Whittingdale MP, will respond for the Government.

Watch live from 4.30pm on Monday 1 March:
Petitions sessions and debates are an opportunity for MPs to discuss the important issues raised by petitions, however they cannot directly change the law or result in a vote to implement the request of the petition.

This petition is being considered in an e-petition session because sittings in Westminster Hall (where e-petitions are normally debated) have been suspended as part of Parliament’s arrangements for adapting to the Coronavirus outbreak.

Thanks,
The Petitions team
UK Government and Parliament
and me!
 
This wound me up the other day - Extinction: Freshwater fish in 'catastrophic' decline
If you read the article you don't find out that the main gist of it is that there is a problem with overfishing, habitat destruction and pollution in other parts of the world. This doesn't stop them from declaring that:



If you actually look into this though you'll find that the last burbot was caught in the late 1960's and is a fussy breeder (they don't breed every year and need very specific environmental circumstances before they can). The sturgeon didn't even breed here and was a visitor rather than a resident. Given the state of UK waterways back then (and I remember from the 70's justy how bad many waterways were) it's surprising we didn't lose more.
I'd also reject this comment from the WWF about UK wildlife:



UK waterways have never been cleaner. The amount of wildfowl we have now far surpasses anything I saw as a kid around here. We now have many species breeding around me that were unthinkable when I was young. And many of these are very fussy about their habitat too.
This is also quite interesting as regards the dramatic fall in eel numbers from the WWT:



This really does indicate that the major cause of this lies elsewhere.
Bah! Just ranting about an article written with what appears to be an agenda with (and is common for the BBC) little research into the topic. It's more a propaganda piece than a blanced article and tries to blame you and I for problems elsewhere, which do need addressing. It's a bit like me living on my quiet Lancashire street being encouraged to do more about the cleaning up of south American city ghettos.


True We and most Western countries have or are in the process of, cleaning up our acts, to such an extent that our country has improved beyond what many of us knew as kids.
Mind you the importation of tens of millions of incomers, legal and illegal over the last few decades has meant massive building on green belt & flood plains thus undoing a lot of what has been done.
When I hear more of these so called experts like the sainted Attenborough or the moronic Packham bleating on about "WE must do more to combat greenhouse gases/population growth/global warming/climate change etc. etc. They never, ever mention that it is in Asia, Africa, S. & C. America where the problem is and their Governments MUST do something about, its always just WE, inferring we in Britain are the feckless ones overbreeding, cutting down rainforest & polluting the planet!!
 

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