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The BBC: are claims of political bias justified? Part 2.

Trouble in Paradise: on R4 Today just now, Sarah (BBC Scotland reporter I think, didn't catch her surname) was spelling out what Salmond is accusing Sturgeon of, when she was interrupted mid flow by the female anchor (Martha Kearney) who spoke over her, saying "which Nicola sturgeon denies of course", to which Sarah MacWhoever immediately agreed "oh yes, of course".

Somebody's off for re-education!

Edit: Sarah Smith according to @johnboyzzz
A daughter of John Smith, and working for the beeb
 
Who says the BBC does not do comedy...
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Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
Who says the BBC does not do comedy...
View attachment 551899

It's XXXXXXX depressing, not funny. The license fee paid by the British public is now being used to actively discourage the usage of correct English in Africa, because it's "more inclusive". Effectively it's promoting the use of a peasant patois over the global language of business and science, potentially condemning a whole continent to poor comprehension and therefore lesser achievement in those fields.

Well done you do-gooding virtue signallers, well done.

(Edit: Just removed sweary mary words as this is in CA)
 
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It's fcuking depressing, not funny. The license fee paid by the British public is now being used to actively discourage the usage of correct English in Africa, because it's "more inclusive". Effectively it's promoting the use of a peasant patois over the global language of business and science, potentially condemning a whole continent to poor comprehension and therefore lesser achievement in those fields.

Well done you do-gooding virtue signallers, well done.
Below the story was another story about poo-gooding. Must remember to add World Toilet Day to my diary.

 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
Just imagining how the withdrawal of Salmond's published statement for further redaction would have been reported had this been Westminster/Boris.
 
Effectively it's promoting the use of a peasant patois over the global language of business and science, potentially condemning a whole continent to poor comprehension and therefore lesser achievement in those fields.
I think you're overreacting a tad, if the BBC really intended to do that then they'd put it out there in French
 
It's XXXXXXX depressing, not funny. The license fee paid by the British public is now being used to actively discourage the usage of correct English in Africa, because it's "more inclusive". Effectively it's promoting the use of a peasant patois over the global language of business and science, potentially condemning a whole continent to poor comprehension and therefore lesser achievement in those fields.

Well done you do-gooding virtue signallers, well done.

(Edit: Just removed sweary mary words as this is in CA)
I understand your angst and these are not words I would say on a regular basis but, the BBC are right to broadcast in pidgin in Africa, IMHO. Why?, well many of them only speak pidgin and if the BBC only broadcast in received pronunciation, nobody would listen to it. They also broadcast world service in proper English like. I'd like to see a review though as all the local stuff is broadcast in English or their interpretation of it and all the satellite stuff they get, DStv usually from SA, is in English so it's clearly reaching an audience.
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
I understand your angst and these are not words I would say on a regular basis but, the BBC are right to broadcast in pidgin in Africa, IMHO. Why?, well many of them only speak pidgin and if the BBC only broadcast in received pronunciation, nobody would listen to it. They also broadcast world service in proper English like. I'd like to see a review though as all the local stuff is broadcast in English or their interpretation of it and all the satellite stuff they get, DStv usually from SA, is in English so it's clearly reaching an audience.
Sorry, I completely disagree; having spent a little time in former colonial Africa, as well as central Asia, the Middle East, and to a lesser extent FRY, the one constant away from the cities (and there too sometimes) is knowledge of the language of English and trust in the veracity of the BBC World Service. English is (ironically) the lingua franca of the world, and it's rare to be unable to speak our mother tongue without anyone understanding you (outside of Bradford obvs), and as said earlier the language of business and science. Indeed in the past some African countries have discouraged the speaking of pidgin as fit only for the uneducated. Most places I've been the more go-getting people spoke English, knowing it to be a way to improve themselves. For the BBC to start broadcasting in pidgin is working directly against that.

As for your comment "if the BBC only broadcast in received pronunciation, nobody would listen to it", you are wrong, as the historic popularity of the BBC World Service proves.

Edit for poor grammar (Argh).
 
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This wound me up the other day - Extinction: Freshwater fish in 'catastrophic' decline
If you read the article you don't find out that the main gist of it is that there is a problem with overfishing, habitat destruction and pollution in other parts of the world. This doesn't stop them from declaring that:

In UK waters, the sturgeon and the burbot have vanished, salmon are disappearing and the European eel remains critically endangered.

If you actually look into this though you'll find that the last burbot was caught in the late 1960's and is a fussy breeder (they don't breed every year and need very specific environmental circumstances before they can). The sturgeon didn't even breed here and was a visitor rather than a resident. Given the state of UK waterways back then (and I remember from the 70's justy how bad many waterways were) it's surprising we didn't lose more.
I'd also reject this comment from the WWF about UK wildlife:

"Nature is in freefall and the UK is no exception: wildlife struggles to survive, let alone thrive, in our polluted waters," said the organisation's chief adviser on freshwater.

UK waterways have never been cleaner. The amount of wildfowl we have now far surpasses anything I saw as a kid around here. We now have many species breeding around me that were unthinkable when I was young. And many of these are very fussy about their habitat too.
This is also quite interesting as regards the dramatic fall in eel numbers from the WWT:

It’s this stage of the eels’ lives that has caused alarm over the species’ risk of extinction. In the past 40 years, the number of glass eels arriving in Europe has fallen by around 95%

This really does indicate that the major cause of this lies elsewhere.
Bah! Just ranting about an article written with what appears to be an agenda with (and is common for the BBC) little research into the topic. It's more a propaganda piece than a blanced article and tries to blame you and I for problems elsewhere, which do need addressing. It's a bit like me living on my quiet Lancashire street being encouraged to do more about the cleaning up of south American city ghettos.
 
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AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
"Nature is in freefall and the UK is no exception: wildlife struggles to survive, let alone thrive, in our polluted waters," said the organisation's chief adviser on freshwater.
A few years ago I'd never seen
  • Red kite
  • Buzzard
  • Sparrowhawk
  • Kestrel
outside a wildlife centre. I could list songbirds etc (that the above birds of prey feed on. If the songbirds aren't thriving, how come the raptors are?) that I hadn't seen before including goldcrest, goldfinch, plenty of varieties of tit (fnar) etc etc etc. Not forgetting the regular sparrows, starlings etc.

I live within the bounds of the sh¡thole that is Southampton (but not for long), but from my garden I have seen the first three regularly over the last couple of years, and there's a kestrel takes the field at the end of the road as its hunting ground.

There's also a colony of white-tailed sea eagles just over the water on the island. This summer I'm hopeful one will come by.
 
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A few years ago I'd never seen
  • Red kite
  • Buzzard
  • Sparrowhawk
  • Kestrel
outside a wildlife centre. I could list songbirds etc (that the above birds of prey feed on. If the songbirds aren't thriving, how come the raptors are?) that I hadn't seen before including goldcrest, goldfinch, plenty of varieties of tit (fnar) etc etc etc.

I live within the bounds of the sh¡thole that is Southampton (but not for long), but from my garden I have seen the first three regularly over the last couple of years, and there's a kestrel takes the field at the end of the road as its hunting ground.

There's also a colony of white-tailed sea eagles just over the water on the island. This summer I'm hopeful one will come by.
Saw buzzard and red kite in field behind my Isle of Wight house yesterday. Saw several kestrels on way into town for shopping. Having got home, topped up the bird feeders in the garden and within minutes a sparrowhawk was whipping around the feeders.....
 
This wound me up the other day - Extinction: Freshwater fish in 'catastrophic' decline
If you read the article you don't find out that the main gist of it is that there is a problem with overfishing, habitat destruction and pollution in other parts of the world. This doesn't stop them from declaring that:



If you actually look into this though you'll find that the last burbot was caught in the late 1960's and is a fussy breeder (they don't breed every year and need very specific environmental circumstances before they can). The sturgeon didn't even breed here and was a visitor rather than a resident. Given the state of UK waterways back then (and I remember from the 70's justy how bad many waterways were) it's surprising we didn't lose more.
I'd also reject this comment from the WWF about UK wildlife:



UK waterways have never been cleaner. The amount of wildfowl we have now far surpasses anything I saw as a kid around here. We now have many species breeding around me that were unthinkable when I was young. And many of these are very fussy about their habitat too.
This is also quite interesting as regards the dramatic fall in eel numbers from the WWT:



This really does indicate that the major cause if this lies elsewhere.
Bah! Just ranting about an article written with what appears to be an agenda with (and is common for the BBC) little research into the topic. It's more a propaganda piece than a blanced article and tries to blame you and I for problems elsewhere, which do need addressing. It's a bit like me living on my quiet Lancashire street being encouraged to do more about the cleaning up of south American city ghettos.

The author of that BBC piece, Helen Briggs, has written a whole load of faecal matter on previous occasions. Her last piece "of note" was when she wrote some dribble about Mink and it showed her lack of knowledge beyond the menu in the staff canteen at Broadcasting House. The water in our local canal is in the highest category for cleanliness and has flourishing bird, fish and animal populations....plus the plant life that's clogging the waterway because of the lockdown.

I referred to her article about Mink on page 221 post #4407.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
Saw buzzard and red kite in field behind my Isle of Wight house yesterday. Saw several kestrels on way into town for shopping. Having got home, topped up the bird feeders in the garden and within minutes a sparrowhawk was whipping around the feeders.....
Where do kestrels shop?
;-)
 
The author of that BBC piece, Helen Briggs, has written a whole load of faecal matter on previous occasions. Her last piece "of note" was when she wrote some dribble about Mink and it showed her lack of knowledge beyond the menu in the staff canteen at Broadcasting House. The water in our local canal is in the highest category for cleanliness and has flourishing bird, fish and animal populations....plus the plant life that's clogging the waterway because of the lockdown.

I referred to her article about Mink on page 221 post #4407.

On the topic of BBC and water ....

 
The author of that BBC piece, Helen Briggs, has written a whole load of faecal matter on previous occasions. Her last piece "of note" was when she wrote some dribble about Mink and it showed her lack of knowledge beyond the menu in the staff canteen at Broadcasting House. The water in our local canal is in the highest category for cleanliness and has flourishing bird, fish and animal populations....plus the plant life that's clogging the waterway because of the lockdown.

I referred to her article about Mink on page 221 post #4407.
There's a number of cormorants feeding on eels in the Upper pool of the Thames (between Tower and London bridges).
Would have been unthinkable about 20 years ago.
 

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