The Battle of Normandy

humble

Clanker
Sadly, one really good colour photograph I saw many years ago appears to have gone as a negative and is now only seen as a black and white print. It showed an entire unit assembly area just before Goodwood. The surviving B/W print is here:



I always remember it because the bloke in the drivers hatch of the nearest tank is wearing a bright red-brown beret or cap....

Goodwood for sure. 7th AD. Only exists as BW photo so any colour version is modern
 

humble

Clanker
Apropos nothing in particular, some nice original colour shots of Normandy tanks:


17fb5da4b2757bdabae8c4fff3839c40.jpg


The 6th Airborne Armoured Reconnaissance Regiment who swopped their Tetrarchs for Cromwells in early August
 

ex4thhussar

Swinger
re Gerry Chester and te North Irish Horse
I sadly have to report that Gerry has just passed away at the woderful age of 96
Deails at ww2talk.com
Gerry Chester, 1922 - 2019

Ron
 
Last edited:
re Gerry Chester and te North Irish Horse
I sadly have to report that Gerry has just passed away at the woderful age of 96
Deails at ww2talk.com
Gerry Chester, 1922 - 2019

Ron
That's a bloody shame, but he'd had a good innings. He was always very willing to respond to e-mails and discuss the minutiae of Churchill tanks and his website was excellent. Then he stopped responding a few years ago and his website then folded, so I guessed that his health was on the wane.

:salut:
 
re Gerry Chester and te North Irish Horse
I sadly have to report that Gerry has just passed away at the woderful age of 96
Deails at ww2talk.com
Gerry Chester, 1922 - 2019

Ron

Sad to hear that Ron (G) a while since I was on WW2Talk and had dialogue with Gerry but his NIH and Churchill related website provided a good startpoint to my own research.
His contribution towards dispelling many of the inaccuracies of Tiger 131s journey to Bovi was a very worthwhile excercise in historical objectivity.
A good bloke RIP.
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
In From Russia With Love.

Nobody came out of Battle of the Bulge with an enhanced reputation.
Made this song popular again!

 

Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer
Possibly of interest but certainly not worthy of it's own thread:

Please see the phot below, shamelessly nicked from another forum I'm on:

440714+Americans+holding+sign+.jpg


The caption tells me, 'Soldiers of the U.S. 3rd Armored Division standing in front of a hedgerow, holding a sign shaped like a German Cross that says, "Soldiers surrender - you are surrounded."
14 July 1944, northwest of Saint-Lô.

. . . and yet at least 2 are armed with M1903 Springfields as a personal weapon-and these examples would seem to be of WWI vintage, as the rear sight is mounted on the top of the forestock just in front of the receiver.

Whilst they all appear to be tooled up and loaded fer b'ar, I'm still left with the impression that these may be support troops taking a few 'Look At Me, Mom' happy snaps. Even so, I would have expected them to be carrying M1 Carbines.

If they are NOT support elements, then I find it surprising that front line troops, at this stage of the war, have still to receive an issue of the Garand.

@ugly - maybe you have a view on this?

. . . anyway, just an idle moment wasted.
 
Possibly of interest but certainly not worthy of it's own thread:

Please see the phot below, shamelessly nicked from another forum I'm on:

440714+Americans+holding+sign+.jpg


The caption tells me, 'Soldiers of the U.S. 3rd Armored Division standing in front of a hedgerow, holding a sign shaped like a German Cross that says, "Soldiers surrender - you are surrounded."
14 July 1944, northwest of Saint-Lô.

. . . and yet at least 2 are armed with M1903 Springfields as a personal weapon-and these examples would seem to be of WWI vintage, as the rear sight is mounted on the top of the forestock just in front of the receiver.

Whilst they all appear to be tooled up and loaded fer b'ar, I'm still left with the impression that these may be support troops taking a few 'Look At Me, Mom' happy snaps. Even so, I would have expected them to be carrying M1 Carbines.

If they are NOT support elements, then I find it surprising that front line troops, at this stage of the war, have still to receive an issue of the Garand.

@ugly - maybe you have a view on this?

. . . anyway, just an idle moment wasted.
Until late 44 and the introduction of the M7 Grenade launcher attachment for the garand, the M1903 was the platform for grenade launching and 1 man per squad was armed with a M1903 variant.

Also Col Hurley Fuller Regimental OC US 23 INF had his men armed with the 03 over the garand at Normandy. (He later was infamous for his capture during the bulge at Clervaux with US 110th INF amd subsequent time at Hammelburg POW camp) then finally the US overstrength for the landings were mostly armed with 03's. Some units took garands away from support units to rearm these new men
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Possibly of interest but certainly not worthy of it's own thread:

Please see the phot below, shamelessly nicked from another forum I'm on:

440714+Americans+holding+sign+.jpg


The caption tells me, 'Soldiers of the U.S. 3rd Armored Division standing in front of a hedgerow, holding a sign shaped like a German Cross that says, "Soldiers surrender - you are surrounded."
14 July 1944, northwest of Saint-Lô.

. . . and yet at least 2 are armed with M1903 Springfields as a personal weapon-and these examples would seem to be of WWI vintage, as the rear sight is mounted on the top of the forestock just in front of the receiver.

Whilst they all appear to be tooled up and loaded fer b'ar, I'm still left with the impression that these may be support troops taking a few 'Look At Me, Mom' happy snaps. Even so, I would have expected them to be carrying M1 Carbines.

If they are NOT support elements, then I find it surprising that front line troops, at this stage of the war, have still to receive an issue of the Garand.

@ugly - maybe you have a view on this?

. . . anyway, just an idle moment wasted.
What Goldbricker said, remember the M1 rifle and Carbines were needed by teeth arms although even teeth arms support troops would be armed with whatever was available. The M1C sniping rifle wasnt available at that time, many 03's were retained for sniping work. Just a note some M1917 rifles were also seen in NW Europe oddly enough in the hands of UK troops as well as P14 rifles. Us troops guarding prison of war cages would sometimes be armed with M1917 rifles too!
 
I'm sure there are more recent Normandy threads than this, but site search didn't find them, so I m parking this here.

Reading in a back issue of Sunday Times culture supplement from the oldays (15 March 2020) a Max Hastings review of a serious (as in 975 page, 35 quid a go) second volume of an academically robust piece of work by Daniel Todman, entitled Britain's War: A New World, 1942-47, and Max has helpfully dropped into his piece a coupla snippets from the book, which are worth filing in your memory banks. They start with a Normandy fact, hence this is my chosen parking place.

At Mortain in August 1944 pilots claimed to have destroyed 90 tanks, and damaged another 59. Operational researchers, however, could find on the battlefield only seven that had been destroyed by aircraft - far more had been stopped by antitank guns.​
Far more Frenchmen bore arms in support of Vichy (fighting the allies in Syria, Madagascar and N Africa) than ever lifted a finger for the Resistance.​
Britain was one of the few belligerent societies in which more soldiers perished than civilians.​
Right then, back to some serious social distancing.
 

offog

LE
I'm sure there are more recent Normandy threads than this, but site search didn't find them, so I m parking this here.

Reading in a back issue of Sunday Times culture supplement from the oldays (15 March 2020) a Max Hastings review of a serious (as in 975 page, 35 quid a go) second volume of an academically robust piece of work by Daniel Todman, entitled Britain's War: A New World, 1942-47, and Max has helpfully dropped into his piece a coupla snippets from the book, which are worth filing in your memory banks. They start with a Normandy fact, hence this is my chosen parking place.

At Mortain in August 1944 pilots claimed to have destroyed 90 tanks, and damaged another 59. Operational researchers, however, could find on the battlefield only seven that had been destroyed by aircraft - far more had been stopped by antitank guns.​
Far more Frenchmen bore arms in support of Vichy (fighting the allies in Syria, Madagascar and N Africa) than ever lifted a finger for the Resistance.​
Britain was one of the few belligerent societies in which more soldiers perished than civilians.​
Right then, back to some serious social distancing.
That last statement I can't get my head round. So more US civilians perished than soldiers?
 
That last statement I can't get my head round. So more US civilians perished than soldiers?
Was the USA, as a society, belligerent?
 

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