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The battle for Goose Green

I think the boy has a lot of reading to do. This is a subject that I feel could lead into something for him as once he gets his teeth into it he doesn't let go.
I will ensure that he is respectful throughout his project.
He Is very grateful for the help and advice so far and is amazed at all the help for his homework from people who he doesn't know and they don't know him.

Thank you.
 
Jesus here do I start, just about every page has corrections in the margins and I had to rewrite whole pages and insert them. It was written in 1991 so plenty of us were still around and easy to find. Universally panned by all that were there.

I have to confess I am surprised and a not a little dissapointed to hear that. I thought it was quite good at the time.
 
In the photo below he appears to be wearing medal ribbons, probably from WW2

View attachment 514047
Mention is made that he was a 33 year Merchant mariner so 1949 if continuous to 82.

I also found this

Perhaps the loveliest tribute to him comes from Captain Jorge Colombo, the commanding officer of the very effective Super Etendard squadron which sank the Atlantic Conveyor as well as HMS Coventry. He has written “Captain North was a real sea-dog with his snowy beard, he was a great and brave man. And when I think of him, I think of these lines by the English poet John Masefield:”

“I must go down to the sea again,

to the lonely sea and sky,

and all I ask is a tall ship,

and a star to steer her by.

And the wheel’s kick,

and the wind’s song,

and the white sails shaking,

and a grey mist on the sea’s face,


and a great dawn breaking …”
 

Hippohunter

War Hero
I have to confess I am surprised and a not a little dissapointed to hear that. I thought it was quite good at the time.
Yep, so were we, there was a lot of hype about this upcoming definitive account of the battle for Goose Green and all we got was this work of fiction. The book refers to incidents I personally witnessed and a couple I was intimately involved in and I do not recognise Adkins accounts of them. While I concede that you can have 4 people standing at each corner of a crossroads and witness the same accident but give different accounts of what happened due to each’s perspective. All 4 can at least agree two vehicle hit each other. This is not the case with our recollections and Adkins accounts.

There is a film being made about Goose Green and I know one of the advisors to the film very well. This can only be an improvement.
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
I've read this thread with interest, during 'the great lockdown' I read Cedric Delves book about SAS Ops in relation to the Falklands (some great background on the war and the high-level decision making) along with the story of NP8901 - which has some deserved bitterness for the UK Gov't and particularly the FCO of the time.
Years ago I bought a DVD, mostly a reproduction of a collection of interviews, historic footage and a small amount of 'dramatised re-enactment' plus some good animated maps of the actions - It seems to have been produced by / for the History Channel. One of the discs specifically covers Goose Green, the 'experts' are not afraid to criticise and praise decisions made as appropriate.

@wafubustard I'm happy to lend it to you if you think it'll be of use.

ETA - typo corrected thanks @par avion for highlighting it :)
 
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merchantman

War Hero
Mention is made that he was a 33 year Merchant mariner so 1949 if continuous to 82.

I also found this

Perhaps the loveliest tribute to him comes from Captain Jorge Colombo, the commanding officer of the very effective Super Etendard squadron which sank the Atlantic Conveyor as well as HMS Coventry. He has written “Captain North was a real sea-dog with his snowy beard, he was a great and brave man. And when I think of him, I think of these lines by the English poet John Masefield:”

“I must go down to the sea again,

to the lonely sea and sky,

and all I ask is a tall ship,

and a star to steer her by.

And the wheel’s kick,

and the wind’s song,

and the white sails shaking,

and a grey mist on the sea’s face,


and a great dawn breaking …”

Yes I saw that, there are also other quotes which suggest he was a sea during ww2 and sunk on a couple of occasions. I'm not sure which is correct. See here:

Recalling one of the Falklands war major logistic losses

Ironically, Captain North was serving on a merchant ship during the Second World War, which sunk after being torpedoed by a German U-boat, but sadly he did not survive the sinking of the Atlantic Conveyor.

I never met the man myself but did hear various stories about him, he was very well liked by all accounts. I remember one story I was told, perhaps apocryphal, that on one ship he had a window put into the door of the bridge toilet so he could see what was going on while he was having a shit.

In the late '90's - 2000 ish I sailed on the replacement Atlantic Conveyor, built in 1984, for a short trip from Liverpool to Antwerp. By that time the ship was registered under a flag of convenience. Her senior officers were Swedish and her junior officers and crew Filipino.
 
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OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
Pedantic head on. Do you mean NP8901, the RM Detatchment on the FI prior to the 1982 invasion?
Yes - sorry, right numbers - wrong order!
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
Samuel L. Jackson as Col. H. Jones
Really? a male ?
I imagine Whoopi Goldberg would be a shoe-in for the good Colonel...
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
Really? a male ?
I imagine Whoopi Goldberg would be a shoe-in for the good Colonel...
Fair's fair, all the Argies will be played by Brits, as the natural Hollywood bad guys.
 
I've read this thread with interest, during 'the great lockdown' I read Cedric Delves book about SAS Ops in relation to the Falklands (some great background on the war and the high-level decision making) along with the story of NP8901 - which has some deserved bitterness for the UK Gov't and particularly the FCO of the time.
Years ago I bought a DVD, mostly a reproduction of a collection of interviews, historic footage and a small amount of 'dramatised re-enactment' plus some good animated maps of the actions - It seems to have been produced by / for the History Channel. One of the discs specifically covers Goose Green, the 'experts' are not afraid to criticise and praise decisions made as appropriate.

@wafubustard I'm happy to lend it to you if you think it'll be of use.

ETA - typo corrected thanks @par avion for highlighting it :)
That would be brilliant if you could thank you.

PM sent.
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
Fair's fair, all the Argies will be played by Brits, as the natural Hollywood bad guys.
And the back story cameo's will have them driving Jag-Waaarrs....
 

Oyibo

LE
And the back story cameo's will have them driving Jag-Waaarrs....

Well the Scimitars were Jag powered, so a bit of artistic license...

(Yes, I know they weren't at Goose Green, but..)
 
Well the Scimitars were Jag powered, so a bit of artistic license...

(Yes, I know they weren't at Goose Green, but..)
Julian Thomson said in his book on the Falklands War that he should have deployed them at Goose Green but at that time he was unaware of their capablities. They were deployed later on in the campaign, apparently to very good effect.
 

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