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The battle for Goose Green

wafubustard

War Hero
My boy is doing a school project and has chosen to cover the battle for Goose Geeen. I think he is looking at the general reasons we won despite the superior Argentine numbers.
I will be using some of the books previously mentioned on these pages and some books I have in my collection.
They are;
March to the South Atlanic, Nick Vaux.
Razors' Edge. The unofficial history of the Falklands War. Hugh Bicheno.
The Argentine fight for the Falklands. Martin Middlebrook.

I also have Sea Harrier over the Falklands and Two sides of Hell by Vincent Bramley.
Are there any other books that anyone else could recommend?

My boy will be reading the relevant threads to see what has been said and I may have to ask questions for him. (To protect the site from the general ramblings of a 14 year old)

Many thanks.
 
I find Mark Adkin's work very comprehensive.
IMG_20201018_140120.png
 
Won't go far wrong with any of the works mentioned (apart from 'Memoirs of a Bluffing Groundsman' by Spider, obvs).

There are some useful observations in RAF Historical Society Journal, perhaps Julian Thompson's on p115 being most pertinent. Also some of the key players commented in The Falklands War, an ICBH 'Witness Seminar' held at Shrivenham to mark the 20th anniversary of the war (p.55 or thereabouts has the rationale for the battle laid out).
 

Troy

LE
[snip]

My boy will be reading the relevant threads to see what has been said and I may have to ask questions for him. (To protect the site from the general ramblings of a 14 year old)

Many thanks.

More likely to protect a 14 year old from the crude and lewd ramblings from a site full of misfits...
 

Daxx

MIA
Book Reviewer
If I remember, I can ping the library at work. They're bound to have a tonne of stuff.
 
Bob Fox’s book ‘Eyewitness Falklands’ has a good section on Goose Green.
Bob was one of the Beeb radio correspondents on Corporate, and was one of two correspondents at Goose Green: the other my old mate Dave Norris, then one of the Daily Mail’s ‘firemen’, ie could be sent anywhere, any time.
The two of them had a different perspective on the battle, as neither had military experience and so looked at it through civvy eyes - while being on the spot throughout, and were present at the surrender negotiations. Bob Fox actually advised Chris Keeble as well.
 
That's some top draw stupidity on display. Thanks for the reminder.

Just realised I forgot Spiders topographical map of the assault on Mount Kent. The details amazing.
20201018_164622.jpg

Its coloured a bit with age
 

Yokel

LE
Did any members of 2 Para from 1982 write a book?

I would add another naval book to the must read list - Admiral Sandy Woodward's One Hundred Days. For overall coverage of the war I recommend Martyn Middlebrook's book - printed in various editions with different titles. He does not over focus on any single aspect of the war and the events proceeding it, not does he show favour or prejudice to any part of the task force.
 

philc

LE
Sunday Times, Insight team The Falklands War is very comprehensive.
 
Just realised I forgot Spiders topographical map of the assault on Mount Kent. The details amazing.
View attachment 513130
Its coloured a bit with age
I thought that was the MRI of his brain?

Forgot to suggest John Frost’s 2 Para Falklands. It was, of course, written within 18 months of the war ending and thus doesn’t contain some of the detail which has emerged since. That said, the book is based upon the late David Benest’s immediate post-action account, and DB wasn’t ever accused of a slapdash approach to accuracy (and as his Telegraph obit noted, he’d reworked some of the account in the light of information unknown to him in 1982/83).


Sunday Times, Insight team The Falklands War is very comprehensive.
Although its account of what Colour Sergeant Muir said to the Argentines is somewhat more polite than what he actually said...
 

Oyibo

LE
Link below gives a very good account from Phil Neame, OC D Coy (the reserve company), from Max Arthur's book Above all Courage.


A very honest account which pays tribute to both soldiers and officers - To quote but one, when Maj Neame was about to take the surrender of Argentinians at Boca House:

I decided that it was a moment of commitment when someone had to expose himself first and it looked like this time officers would earn their pay. I was about to start forward when Corporal Harley went dashing ahead of me, saying, 'This isn't your job, Sir, you're too valuable. This is toms' work.' So he was really the first guy to take the chance about the surrender.

OC B Coy, Maj John Crosland's account from the same book:


The reserve company's story is interesting because they, arguably, had a better view of the battle: A & B companies were in very difficult situations (A Coy's especially) and while memoires from their experiences are gripping, they tend to be focussed on a much narrower battlefront because they were so pinned down.

Chris Keeble's contribution was amazing IMO - supreme bluff to get the surrender.
 

wafubustard

War Hero
Theres some great info here. I can see my book shelf getting more books on it. Of course as they are going to be for educational purposes I cannot see mrs WB complaining that I have too many books.
It should keep the boy occupied for a fair bit.

One of the things the boy is looking at is how we pulled it off despite the number of Argentine troops. Explaining the difference between conscripts and a professional army has opened his eyes. I will try and ensure that he recognises the difference between the two and gives the due respect to both sides.
@Oyibo I think he is going to be looking into that bluff in some detail.

Thank you for all the help so far.
 
One of the things the boy is looking at is how we pulled it off despite the number of Argentine troops.
Apparently a lot of the Argentines who were captured when Goose Green surrended were Air Force Troops who played little or no part in the battle. The amount of infantry on both sides was roughly equal. I think it was in Martin Middlebrooks book.

However 2 Para only had two mortar tubes with them and limited ammunition as fire support. There was a frigate meant to provide Naval Gunfire support but its 4.5 gun went U/S at the start of the battle. Brigadier Thompson admitted afterwards they should have had a battery of 105 howitzers in support.

The Argies had dug in mortars, HMG, 105 Artillery and used AA guns in the ground role against 2 Para, so rather than look at numbers it might also be better if you look at how 2 Para prevailed despite having inadequate fire support.

If the battle had continued 2 Para would have had artillery and Harrier ground attack support that Thompson finally realised that they needed. Indeed Major Keeble used a Harrier strike as a firepower demonstration to show the Argentine Commander what was in store for him and his men if they did not surrender. A classic case of 'peace through superior firepower'.
 
Graham Bound's "Invasion 1982" gives a good account from the Islanders' perspective and interesting snippets into the mindset of the Argentine leadership at GG. Mike Norman's "There and Back" for more on Chris Keeble's leadership.
 

Daxx

MIA
Book Reviewer
Ok. I now have a huage list of books, access to DVD's and shortly papers and research articles. PM'd @wafubustard
 
This guy was Patrols Platoon and at the spear point during the Goose green battle.

1857825756.jpg

I may have a copy knocking about somewhere.
 

wafubustard

War Hero
Theres some great suggestions coming up here. Thank you.
 

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