The Baltics: should Britain be rushing to their defence?

No idea but I’d imagine not if they’re only buying 4! I would hazard a guess that they’ll be sending their chaps to a European operator who may have invested in a sim such as Sweden or the US Army in Europe. Much will depend on what variant they’re buying.

Regards,
MM
I posted earlier on. The latest as I understand it; Poland having signed a Polish production contract may very well being buying a sim - which if they do, there are now a fair few operators, e.g. Austria, that might also benefit from the Sim.

Edit to add - if the US are sending that number of platforms at what point do they bring in a Sim? Questions way beyond my knowledge.
 
I was under the impression that the Latvian AF were looking to use the UH-60M for SAR, which would seem to imply that they would be generating two airframes at readiness daily e.g. primary at 15 mins NTM and secondary at 45 mins NTM by day and both on 60 mins NTM by night.

This does not preclude either the aircraft or crews from being dynamically retasked, but will be a considerable burden for a (very) small air force.
Your second point is of interest - given the investment for a population of 1.6m and plummeting (2m in 2013 and 2.6m in the 90s) it is a huge investment from one perspective. Hence, earlier on, I suggested that Estonia, Lithuania and Latvia invest in a joint force, tacked on to the Polish order, it would have made sense.
 
...if the US are sending that number of platforms at what point do they bring in a Sim?...
The US Army will already have UH-60 sims in Europe.

Regards,
MM
 
Prefer Slovaks or Latvians, but on a cold Sunday morning, wouldn't be so shabby. @Condottiere ? Your views on Polish womanhood? @Fuchs66 shut up!
The whole spectrum of female looks and behaviour is there in Poland as in most other countries.

As regards me, being a London Pole of the generation born and brought up here from parents settled post-WW2, I had little exposure to Poles in Poland post-puberty as I had already then decided that I wanted a career in the forces so stopped going on (extended) family visits and holidays which I did in my younger years.

Since the end of Communism I was back several times with UK training missions and on holiday, but I was already married (to non-Poles) so not sampling the local delights. LHG no.2 and I almost bought a house there, but the local females definitely didn't come into consideration when making the purchase decisions.

The house purchase was ultimately decided against because of the accession of the current (PiS) government to power in Warsaw (bigoted, xenophobic, ultra-religious, nationalists with massive chips on their shoulders and penchant for conspiracy theories) and by the fact that I had landed a great job abroad for several years, from where it would be difficult to maintain and utilise a second home in Poland as well as our London pied-a-terre.
 
There are plenty of towns along the German Baltic coast with names of Slavic or Swedish origins, which does not make them any less German than the other towns. There's even a Slavic minority in the southern part of what was East Germany, the Sorbs, complete with their own language, they're still German citizens.
Movement of peoples over the last 2000 years has led to considerable language mixing and adoption of differing surnames and place names throughout the lands from the Elbe to the old marchlands north of the Black Sea (the word "Ukraine" comes from old Slavic "u krajinie" meaning "at the edge of").

In relation to the Sorbs/Lusatians, these are the remnants in modern Germany of the much greater expanse of western Slav tribes which had settled up to and along the Elbe (itself a twist of the Slav word "Laba" as in current Czech) and all along the Baltic coast up to the current Danish peninsula. The German word "Pommern" or "Pomerania" in English is a twist on the Slavic "po more" meaining "along the sea" ("Pomorze" in modern Polish). The German "Drang nach Osten" since early mediaeval times encroached on and absorbed these territories.

It is highly likely (with some evidential support) that before the Slavonic peoples colonised these lands they had been settled by Germanic tribes as they moved west, but with the huge move of Germanic peoples westward and southward during and after the collapse of the (western) Roman Empire these lands were mostly abandoned and the Slavonic tribes moved in from the East.

There is linguistic evidence that Germanic and Slavonic tribes have existed alongside each other since ancient pre-history. The terms "Slav", "Slavonic" and "Slavic" come from the word the Slavs use to describe themselves "Sloviani" meaning people of the "slovo" ("word" in English), i.e. people who can speak (to each other). The Slav word for Germans is "Nemtsi" meaning the mute people i.e. people who cannot speak (to us). The word "nemi" means "mute". It is also revelatory that "ne mi" means "not us".

It is quite noticeable that many modern Germans have surnames of Slavonic origin. While there is a certain amount of relatively recent admixture (e.g. the famous football striker "Lewandowski") many have ancient roots from when the "Polabians" (the people along the Elbe), the Pomeranians, the Lusatians, etc. were absorbed into Germany. This whole process ridicules the race theories of Nazi Germany, wherby Slavs were considered "sub-human". Giving rise to such anomalies as SS General Bach-Zelewski who brutally crushed the Warsaw Uprising and SS special forces leader Otto Skorzeny whose name harks back to an old Pomeranian (i.e. Slav) land-holding family.

It would be a great piece of research to look into the etymology of the namings; indeed when you consider skruve is Latvian for screw, stacija - station, snieks VERY similar to the old anglo saxon word for snow, there can be a some commonality of language origin.
The root language of all of these languages is proto-Indo-European, way back when in the mists of time. It goes some way to explaining base similarities, Then there are loan words from foreign languages (dating back to ancient and church Latin and Greek) which are readily adopted as they give a precise name to something for which there is no equivalent in the receiving language.

Comparative linguistics is a fascinating subject which I dabble in. It is very easy to get out of one’s depth in this subject matter.
 
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As for the so named “Baltic Nations”, ethno-linguistically the Estonians or Ests differ from the Latvians, Lithuanians and the original Prussians (wiped out by the Teutonic Knights by the end of the 12th Century) in being of non Indo-European origin, but of Finno-Ugric descent like their close relatives the Finns and more distant cousins the Magyars or Hungarians. The other three “Baltic” peoples are ethno-linguistically related to the Slavs, but split off much earlier.
 
As for the so named “Baltic Nations”, ethno-linguistically the Estonians or Ests differ from the Latvians, Lithuanians and the original Prussians (wiped out by the Teutonic Knights by the end of the 12th Century) in being of non Indo-European origin, but of Finno-Ugric descent like their close relatives the Finns and more distant cousins the Magyars or Hungarians. The other three “Baltic” peoples are ethno-linguistically related to the Slavs, but split off much earlier.
Where is that evidenced?
 
Where is that evidenced?
Don’t have the material to hand. But comparative linguistic studies point to evidence that Slav and Baltic languages share certain linguistic traits that differ from the other Indo-European branches. However, the split between Slav and Baltic peoples happened relatively a short time after the previous branching off and then they diverged considerably.

IIRC, there have been studies of genetic haplogroupings that appear to add support to this thesis.
 
Apache and Wildcat to touch down in Estonia as UK bolsters its commitment to NATO
I know it’s on the MoD RSS, but better here imo:
Wildcat and Apache helicopters will be deployed to Estonia this year, Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson announced at a meeting of NATO Defence Ministers in Brussels.

The Army aircraft will provide aviation training opportunities to NATO allies on Estonia’s annual Exercise Spring Storm as well as to the UK-led battlegroup on NATO enhanced Forward Presence.

The helicopter deployment will boost our contingent to around 1,000 personnel in the Baltics, making the UK the largest contributor to NATO’s Enhanced Forward Presence - further reinforcing the Alliance’s deterrence and defence posture.
 
Well the previous head of the anti-corruption office KNAB has been arrested on... corruption charges.

Get ready for more unloading on the Latvian system as just this Saturday, Mayor of Riga Nils Ušakovs took to the podium in front of a crowd numbering several thousand (who to believe) and although he is under investigation for corruption among other things, with his first words said ''I am proud to be Russian.''

Spring could warm up pretty quickly.
 
Well the previous head of the anti-corruption office KNAB has been arrested on... corruption charges.

Get ready for more unloading on the Latvian system as just this Saturday, Mayor of Riga Nils Ušakovs took to the podium in front of a crowd numbering several thousand (who to believe) and although he is under investigation for corruption among other things, with his first words said ''I am proud to be Russian.''
Sure, it would be better to show any evidence of his guilty (exept that obviouse fact that he is Russian) to calm people. But, on the second thought, there are little doubts, that he was arrested only for being Russian and the Nazies have no any evidence.

Spring could warm up pretty quickly.
Thats true.
 
It would be a great piece of research to look into the etymology of the namings; indeed when you consider skruve is Latvian for screw, stacija - station, snieks VERY similar to the old anglo saxon word for snow, there can be a some commonality of language origin.
A very clever but sadly late relative once told me of rescuing a boat load of Latvians from the Baltic early in the war and he went on to explain it was a good thing as they were Ethnically very close to the English!

At the time I thought the daft old welsh bugger was err, daft?
 
A very clever but sadly late relative once told me of rescuing a boat load of Latvians from the Baltic early in the war and he went on to explain it was a good thing as they were Ethnically very close to the English!

At the time I thought the daft old welsh bugger was err, daft?
@Condottiere does raise a good point but in terms of settling in Slovakia, the Czech Republic or Latvia, with Latvian Latvians, it is easier - maybe it was the Hansa League, maybe it was the historic viking villages on the coast of the Baltic Sea and perhaps some of them went to Normandy and eventually the UK, however, in Central Europe I stood out. Here, if I am asking simple questions they answer without the bat of an eyelid - the Central Europeans knew I was not one of them. Strange one. Time for DNA test :)
 
I thought we already had a 1000 bods in Estonia? Is this a rotation or an increase?
Baltics
We had about 900, now about 1,000:
About 900 British personnel will rotate on a continuous basis alongside Danish, French, and host nation Estonian forces, with 1 YORKS currently providing the bulk of the combat capable infantry force.
The Americans increasing their presence in Latvian should I think myself lucky that I am coming home on Saturday? :)
:) it’s just Gavin et al saying we’re doing more despite what’s going on at home
 

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