The Arrse Twitchers thread

Goatman

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Ah Pembrokeshire...beautiful, also called locally The Englishry :)

re buzzards vs kites etc we have plenty of buzzards down here in the New Forest area, and I've only seen kites a couple of times.

( maybe the ravens keep them both away ? )

A mate who lives Canada Common way says that come summer he also sees a hobby locally - its on my 'To Twitch' list :)
 
Ah Pembrokeshire...beautiful, also called locally The Englishry :)
Very much so: almost like being in Surrey but with indifferent dentistry.

Woman and I are quite taken with it, tbh: the coastline is to die for and the off-shore cruising is superb. Seal, dolphin and whale (if you're lucky) with puffin, cormorant and curlew etc as a supporting cast. Up to the hills and it's Red Kite, Buzzard and Hawk.

Love the place.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Sailed in Dale as a lad, across the water from Milford Haven.....very pleasant bar a couple of lively moments :)
 
I have a few pics of what many might consider as ‘exotics,’ but living close to The Amazon they’re fairly common here...

As and when I’ll add more.

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A bit of a cheat with these two as I saw them yesterday in an aviary.
 
Black Vultures, are agreat bird to use as a beginners bird in falconry classes, easy to imprint, to put it into laymans terms ,when manned they are daft as a brush, of course absolutely no use for the hunt ,but are a great demo bird who will perch up between the crowd and not disturb other demo birds, personally I used to prefer flying vultures to eagles,flying the bald eagle was like flying a frozen turkey
 
brambling.jpg


An odd looking Chaffinch I said to the Mrs yesterday as I looked out the back window. I think it's a Brambling which I've never seen before. Open to correction on the ID.
 
I don't have a camera suitable to get photos, but my garden has been overrun by Fieldfares. When the first two turned up I was delighted, having never seen one before. But they are bullies, chasing all the regulars away from the food. Now there are over a dozen of the little avian nazis out there driving all the 'lesser' birds away.

Twats.
 
I don't have a camera suitable to get photos, but my garden has been overrun by Fieldfares. When the first two turned up I was delighted, having never seen one before. But they are bullies, chasing all the regulars away from the food. Now there are over a dozen of the little avian nazis out there driving all the 'lesser' birds away.

Twats.
Fieldfares are a little bit shitty, that is alright for birds in the turdus family well Turdidae, the same as thrushes and blackbirds.
I've had a couple in the garden while it's been snowy. So far they are sticking to the rosehips and the starling mob are keeping them under control around the feeders, although I've heard that they will stab other birds' skulls if food is scarce. 'My' fieldfares seem to be reluctant to use the feeder hanging on the edge of the holly bush so perhaps they prefer more open ground and the tits, finches and robins are still getting a chance.
 
It's strange that such a large number of birds migrate to us in winter from Scandinavia and northern europe whilst a large number of ours migrate further south. Amongst the winter migrants into our gardens and fields are blackbirds from Northern Russia replacing our softer local blackbirds who migrate southwards. The southern movement of Blackbirds is repeated throughout Europe, just as well for those Blackbirds arriving from the North. I do wonder why ours bother to move south if exactly the same species can manage to find food, perhaps it is a giant exchange program?
Edited to add that the fieldfares visiting here thrive on Cotoneaster berries.
 
It's strange that such a large number of birds migrate to us in winter from Scandinavia and northern europe whilst a large number of ours migrate further south. Amongst the winter migrants into our gardens and fields are blackbirds from Northern Russia replacing our softer local blackbirds who migrate southwards. The southern movement of Blackbirds is repeated throughout Europe, just as well for those Blackbirds arriving from the North. I do wonder why ours bother to move south if exactly the same species can manage to find food, perhaps it is a giant exchange program?
Edited to add that the fieldfares visiting here thrive on Cotoneaster berries.
Maybe the moving south and back north enables a genetic diversity? I don't know if the same blackbirds return to the same nest sites like ospreys, or if they settle in new areas with each migration.

Or maybe the imperative to head south is too strong, regardless of where they originate from?

One thing I have noticed is that the Russian birds have no traffic awareness!
 
It's strange that such a large number of birds migrate to us in winter from Scandinavia and northern europe whilst a large number of ours migrate further south. Amongst the winter migrants into our gardens and fields are blackbirds from Northern Russia replacing our softer local blackbirds who migrate southwards. The southern movement of Blackbirds is repeated throughout Europe, just as well for those Blackbirds arriving from the North. I do wonder why ours bother to move south if exactly the same species can manage to find food, perhaps it is a giant exchange program?
Edited to add that the fieldfares visiting here thrive on Cotoneaster berries.
I didn't know that Blackbirds migrate. Starlings do too I believe.
 
I didn't know that Blackbirds migrate. Starlings do too I believe.
Blackbirds from Scotland migrate to Ireland I believe. I don't know where the Irish ones go. All very strange. I know little about Starlings, except that according to #CivvyLurker, apparently they stab other birds through the skull. Here was I thinking that the birds were mainly harmless.
 
Blackbirds from Scotland migrate to Ireland I believe. I don't know where the Irish ones go. All very strange. I know little about Starlings, except that according to #CivvyLurker, apparently they stab other birds through the skull. Here was I thinking that the birds were mainly harmless.
I'd read that it was the fieldfares that can get a bit stabby in a food shortage, but having watched the resident starling tribe squabble over mealworms, I could believe it of them too!

I didn't know that Blackbirds migrate. Starlings do too I believe.
Some starlings do and some stay put. I never had them visit the garden until I had been hanging feeders for about a year. Now a decade on, they are here daily and the numbers visiting have gradually increased. Each year the parents bring their fat grey babies to sit in a line on the edge of the garage guttering to be fed, eventually progressing to crashing into the feeders and working out that they can't drill through plastic side. I assume that they are the same birds throughout the year as they seem to have the same familiar routines around the feeders. Perhaps feeding all year has persuaded them it's a reliable feed source?
 
I only feed the birds in the winter now. There has been some reporting that birds visiting feeders not only gain from the food provided but loose out on the viruses picked up. Greenfinches have been particularly badly affected, there has been a noticeable decline in their numbers in recent years.

Edited for they. there, their.
 
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