The Army - Did you get what you wanted out of it?

#1
I was watching telly this evening, and saw the current Army adverts with all the stuff on action, adventure, camaraderie etc, and it made me wonder - did those who joined get what they joined for, or did they get what they wanted out of it, maybe not what the recruiters promised but something deeper that turned their lives around for the better (or for the worse)
Was it everything you wanted?
 
#3
I joined the Infantry at 17 and it was a short sharp shock to growing up fast ! Sure at time's there was alot of "Get on the Bus Get off the Bus" and a bit of "Hurry Up and Wait" but from time to time i do have to confess to missing it alot ! What i missed the most was the Mates i made,i would also say that the majority of others that leave would also say the same ! The stuff you go through together,Good/Bad,it binds you for life.I have plenty of friends in Civi Street,good people,but none can really compare to the lads i used to serve with,Celer et Audax Fellas wherever you are.(in answer to your question,Yes)
 
#4
Boys clothes and shite boots. I would elaborate about shite green WRAC knickers that cut your circulation off, but hey, it's late.
 
#6
I'm about to start my last 6 months and was dined out of the Mess last week. Read these extracts from my dine-out speech and see if 22 years were worth it :)

...Bodie and Doyle weren’t recruiting so I had to tell the crusty old Woofer’s CSgt that I wanted to be a tank driver and drive Chieftains. This was probably something to do with the fact that I was an Army Cadet in the Queens Own Hussars. I soon had that dream beaten out of me and I ended up in a cellar wearing a brown dustcoat fixing guns and sharpening my growing knife collection...

...Although I took a pay-cut, McDonalds didn’t quite have the same sports and travel opportunities. In the last 21 and half years, the Army has sent me to Northern Ireland 4 times; the first time in 1987 and the last time when peace broke out and ended again 18 months later. I’ve been to Bosnia twice, went to the Falklands when the war was starting, and most recently I took advantage of the chance to invade Iraq. I’ve lived in Germany for the last six years and also been sent to Italy, Spain, Florida and twice to California.

I’ve walked up hills and skied down mountains; climbed cliffs and abseiled off bridges. I’ve canoed across lakes and down rivers. I’ve sailed dinghies on lakes and yachts on oceans; I’ve windsurfed on the Mediterranean and scuba-dived under it. I’ve skydived out of 32 types of aircraft and 7 types of helicopter at heights ranging from 300 to 23,000 feet in 13 different countries.

At work I’ve fixed and fired .22” pistols and 155mm AS90 artillery pieces and most things in between. I’ve ridden motorbikes, driven a range of cars, armoured cars, small trucks, big trucks, little tanks, big guns, snowmobiles and ambulances. I’ve flown gliders, Chipmunks and Gazelles and even driven a steam train...

...I can’t have my moment without mentioning the support I’ve had along the way from both alcohol and amongst others Big Jackie, Judy the Moose, Christine the rabbit, Homer Simpson woman, Freddy Krueger fingers, and the bloke-smoking, buster-sucking, sperm-swallowing, starfish-licking stumpy sex-dwarf...

...Everybody has dreams. I’ve lived most of mine and I’m working on the rest. What’s your dream?
 
#7
All things considered i suppose so but if i had my time again i'd have joined a different corps, int or AAC. Maybe even put some effort into school and tried for a commission.
 
#8
Yes - and a lot more. Like the man said it would, it made a man of me. Again and again, when I am not instinctively sure what to do in a situation I fall back on (the wrong way, the right way) The Army Way.
 
#9
I gained an inbuilt compulsion to turn up on time, finish everything I was asked to do, look smart at all times, look after my muckers, not accept defeat, be a devious and cruel b*stard when it comes to revenge, to improvise when things aren't going right, to adapt to a situation that changes in the middle, to overcome problems put in the way and not to whine like a girl when somebody more important than you asks you to do something you don't like.

The downsides were that I still hate most fcuking civvies, have no "off" switch when it comes to drinking, sometimes forget that violence is not necessarily the answer to every argument and still have a compulsion to occasionally live in a hole in the ground for months at a time.

So on the whole, yes.
 
#10
Boxingmad said:
I was watching telly this evening, and saw the current Army adverts with all the stuff on action, adventure, camaraderie etc, and it made me wonder - did those who joined get what they joined for, or did they get what they wanted out of it, maybe not what the recruiters promised but something deeper that turned their lives around for the better (or for the worse)
Was it everything you wanted?

I joined an Army that became a Police Force; I miss the former.......
 
#14
No complaints here. Made some fcuk ups but glad I did, if I could do it again I would, even the fcuk ups. I'd change a couple of things I suppose. I didn't join for the promotion/career aspiration though I wanted a trade and a full 22 year career, that I was certain from day one. Made the SNCOs Mess, I got the trade and full career and with it comes friends and memories. Days to do now. So definately no complaints here.
 
#15
Aunty Stella you took the words right out of my mouth
 
#16
I got what I got - I wanted to be a soldier - I still am - just don't have an army to fight for.
Leaving the army doesn't make you a civvi - If you keep the attitude and standards you were taught you'll always be a soldier and viewed that way by those who know you.

The world isn't black and white - having been a soldier enabled me to read the grey bits. - Priceless.
 
#17
sprjim said:
I gained arthritis.and ability to scare people at work with strange behaviour and innapropriate responses
That makes two of us then. Nice one 8)
Three of us... except I'm only 25! Still, I feel an element of pride when I explain to people I got it as a result of training for deployment to Iraq. Although I always get funny looks when I tell people I was disapointed that I couldn't deploy because of it.

And I love the surge of pride I get on November the 11th, I'm sure no civvie feels it as strongly as us ex-squaddies.
 
#18
amazing__lobster said:
sprjim said:
I gained arthritis.and ability to scare people at work with strange behaviour and innapropriate responses
That makes two of us then. Nice one 8)
Three of us... except I'm only 25! Still, I feel an element of pride when I explain to people I got it as a result of training for deployment to Iraq. Although I always get funny looks when I tell people I was disapointed that I couldn't deploy because of it.

And I love the surge of pride I get on November the 11th, I'm sure no civvie feels it as strongly as us ex-squaddies.
Me too but I remember for two reasons. The war dead and also it is my Nan's birthday, born 11th November 1906. Sadly she passed away in 2003 aged 96. Her 96th and final b'day in 2002 was followed by the birth of my daughter a couple of days later. This year Nan would have been 100, the significnace of all this is very personal to me. I leave the mil next year and will spend every Armistice Sunday flying to England, tube to the Cenotaph to join the nation in mourning and then visit my Nan's grave later that day for personal mourning.
 
#19
Nor often I get involved in non-admin stuff these days, but you lot have struck a chord.

I was ready to leave and have no regrets in doing so. That said I would change very little other than my fk ups. Amazing experience and I got a huge amount from it - no, not just destroyed relationships, knackered knees and liver cirrhosis!
 
#20
dsmtb said:
I got what I got - I wanted to be a soldier - I still am - just don't have an army to fight for.
Leaving the army doesn't make you a civvi - If you keep the attitude and standards you were taught you'll always be a soldier and viewed that way by those who know you.

The world isn't black and white - having been a soldier enabled me to read the grey bits. - Priceless.
Echo this post, nail on head. Also Aunty Stellas previous post,less the violence mind, Iam a grown up now :D

He also lies about always lookign smart, he's from Dudley
 

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