The Anglosphere Challenge.

#1
Just started ploughing through this book by James Bennett, mainly because it doesn't follow the usual narrative of the decline and evisceration of western civilisation, but offers a different perspective based on what I suppose is soft power and a form of what I am sure will be described as cultural imperialism by the usual suspects. I thought about putting this thread elsewhere but is definitely worth a run here.
The basic premise is that the communication revolution is based on Western thought, technology, and culture and must prevail eventually.
 
#3
Even if it does, that doesn't mean it will be to the benefit of the classic Western nations. How much advantage did Italy ultimately gain from the universalisation of Latin?

Economic heft is what counts and that's about productivity. In the absence of a superior production paradigm, that means it's about people. The future's Asian, folks.
 
#4
Even if it does, that doesn't mean it will be to the benefit of the classic Western nations. How much advantage did Italy ultimately gain from the universalisation of Latin?

Economic heft is what counts and that's about productivity. In the absence of a superior production paradigm, that means it's about people. The future's Asian, folks.
It might very well be, but it will be based on western technology catering to western thought and culture which will filter into even the Chinese mainstream, as it is already doing. It does work..modern Japan did not create itself...it took a bit of defeat, humble pie and western influence and an A bomb or two.
China has come a long way from the cultural revolution to state capitalism, real capitalism in all but name is not far away.
On your views on productivity, you are absolutely right. Even after the shock of 2008 most CEO's haven't learned anything important and are still focussed on personal gain. Share buy-backs will be the next scandal...a shameless device to shore up a share price to meet bonus criteria for the next quarter at the expense of the investment that is integral to the operation of real capitalism. I would shoot the bastards but that would make me a totalitarian lefty.
 
#5
It might very well be, but it will be based on western technology catering to western thought and culture which will filter into even the Chinese mainstream, as it is already doing.
If you mean economic and cultural players will borrow off each other, sure. They always have. That's not to say they'll imitate one model - Meiji Japan was very unlike contemporary US or European societies and today's Japan isn't much like those it's borrowed from either.

To take just one example, consider the internet. It's been hailed for decades as the greatest tool for undermining authoritarianism the world has ever seen and all we needed to do was introduce it then sit back and watch the spread of apple-pie restaurants across the globe.

It hasn't worked out quite according to plan, though. Internet penetration in the PRC has reached over 52% of the population - higher then most of Korea outside the major cities - and it's actually aided the CCP's rule by providing a means of venting harmlessly while also allowing citizens to bypass traditional information controls between levels of government and provide an unprecedented level of public supervision.

Economically, the PRC is one of the most dynamic Internet marketplaces in the world, taking online sales of goods and services to extremes we've not begun to experience. We think Amazon's A Big Firm but Taobao blows it out of the water by just about any measure - that's before taking into account the other online activities of the parent Alibaba group.

So, in the sense that the internet was invented in the West, you're right. My question is, what practical difference will that make to the West's position in a world dominated by scale?
 
#6
If you mean economic and cultural players will borrow off each other, sure. They always have. That's not to say they'll imitate one model - Meiji Japan was very unlike contemporary US or European societies and today's Japan isn't much like those it's borrowed from either.

To take just one example, consider the internet. It's been hailed for decades as the greatest tool for undermining authoritarianism the world has ever seen and all we needed to do was introduce it then sit back and watch the spread of apple-pie restaurants across the globe.

It hasn't worked out quite according to plan, though. Internet penetration in the PRC has reached over 52% of the population - higher then most of Korea outside the major cities - and it's actually aided the CCP's rule by providing a means of venting harmlessly while also allowing citizens to bypass traditional information controls between levels of government and provide an unprecedented level of public supervision.

Economically, the PRC is one of the most dynamic Internet marketplaces in the world, taking online sales of goods and services to extremes we've not begun to experience. We think Amazon's A Big Firm but Taobao blows it out of the water by just about any measure - that's before taking into account the other online activities of the parent Alibaba group.

So, in the sense that the internet was invented in the West, you're right. My question is, what practical difference will that make to the West's position in a world dominated by scale?
Not much methinks. Or maybe as much as inventing gunpowder did for the Chinese; steam power for the west; radio, tv, stainless steel and etc. All of which became mundane eventually
 
#8
.... In the absence of a superior production paradigm, that means it's about people. The future's Asian, folks.
For a half century or so. People are becoming redundant. The future is about the people that can build the best robots.
 
#9
The Anglosphere nations continue to lower their average national IQs by importing large numbers of immigrants ....
They have no choice since our birth rates are falling. Without immigrants, the populations of western countries will fall dramatically over the next century. For instance, without immigration it is projected that the population of Germany would fall from 81 million today to 68 million by 2060.
 

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#15
I thought about putting this thread elsewhere but is definitely worth a run here.
Again: there is supposed to be at least some analysis beyond 'I've just read a book'. I'm moving it to the Int Cell.
 
#16
For a half century or so. People are becoming redundant. The future is about the people that can build the best robots.
This. But not only robots, the best algorithms too.

Doctors will be replace by computer programs. It costs a lot to train one doc, but one expensive computer program diagnosing illnesses will work out far far cheaper and will probably be more effective. For example a network of them would spot outbreaks of illnesses pretty much instantaneously.

Same goes for stockbrokers, if it's not already happening; replaceable with a clever algorithm.

We're going to have a lot of redundant folk knocking about and a super-elite at t'other end of the scale.
 
#17
Again: there is supposed to be at least some analysis beyond 'I've just read a book'. I'm moving it to the Int Cell.
Tyr.... Ahhh can't be arrsed

I miss Viro
 
#18
The future is about the people that can build the best robots.
I would say it's more about who can most effectively utilise their factors of production in a comprehensive way. Any government woth pretence to a balanced economy has to grasp first that the ultimate aim of production is not to create output at the factory end but satisfy input at the consumer end.

Robots may indeed be able to outproduce humans in most fields but what use is production without consumption?
 
#20
The Anglosphere nations continue to lower their average national IQs by importing large numbers of immigrants from regions with low average IQ's China and Japan, which have higher average IQs in any case (105) do not do this.

https://iq-research.info/en/page/average-iq-by-country

If knowledge and intelligence are the key to success in the 21st century, then the future is indeed East Asian.
All IQ tests prove is who is better at doing IQ tests.
What is more relevant is who is producing skilled staff with the skills required.
A good generalist education may in the longer run be more productive and give a more flexible, innovative thinker than one focussed on hothousing examination passes.
 

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