The Anarchy: The Relentless Rise of the East India Company

The Anarchy: The Relentless Rise of the East India Company

They are a product of their cosy, naive, pampered left leaning , learning environment coupled with heir own ignorance due to never really having traveled or even spoken to the people of these countries .

When you combine the above with their rush to fall over and pay penance for something done by someone they never knew, to someone they never knew, it's not a surprise.

Not once were they taught about the vicious Tribal, Clan or Caste wars that was a general and regular occurrence, ...where those from smaller tribes/castes, had zero chance of advancement unless they fought for it or left to form their own communities. and or where your role in live depended on your tribe/surname or where you were born.

Did these continents use river water to power mills and then boil that water to create steam power and then fuel that with wood, then coal then gas or oil?

Did they refine any of the above to become a superpower? No...the reason being that their ancient systems had no incentive to find new ways of doing things as they were doing very well without it..


Many an argument by me with theses Libtards ....and it's at times like this, that i realize that verbal abuse and physical violence often has it's own effective learning curve.
My bold, so very true, as in my experience of Africa, the "woke" generation are often descendants of the sort of people that became missionaries in Africa and who begged the British Govt. to send out troops to guard them & their native flocks from other nasty African chiefs or Arab slave traders.
Our history has been so distorted/rewritten to suit the "woke" mentality, especially over Slavery, where it is conveniently forgotten/overlooked that from the 1830's onwards we used our navy to try & prevent it all around the African coast!
My own Police force, the NRP fought pitched battles against slavers up until the early 20th C.
These idiots really piss me off, very few if any have first hand experience of Africa/Africans!!
 
Any books you'd recommend on the empire?
A good question and not an easy one to answer, it would be career suicide in today's PC driven society for an historian to write a book highlighting the benefits of the British Empire. I once phoned up LBC and tried to explain that the empire can't be considered in terms of black and white.

For over 300 years the empire ruled over hundreds of millions of people, you can't simply write the entire thing off as being bad, but you can't write it off as being good either. The British shipped more slaves than any other nation in modern history, that is undoubtedly bad. However, they also stopped slavery across the world, which is undoubtedly good. Should that not also deserve recognition?

You have to remain impartial (which is why I refer to 'the British' instead of we) and be truthful to the evidence and sources, even if they go against the interests of Her Majesty's Government. That is, after all, the only fair way to study history.

How one judges the sources is biggest problem, modern universities, the BBC and SJW try to judge the past through the rose tinted lenses of the 21C. Personally, I think this is wrong because you can't hold a society at fault for something they're not even aware of.

Race is a perfect example, it's recently been highlighted that Churchill was a racist, this has delighted all the silly lefties and students who don't understand context. Churchill was definitely a racist by the standards of the 21 C, why should that be a surprise? So was Gandhi. Racism and eugenics were studied at universities and it was a widely held belief that some people were superior, similar ideas held sway about class. Nowadays we know this is nonsense, but at the time it was considered normal. How is it fair then to condemn what was a part of every day life?

Imho, the only way you can compare the empire is to do so against other things that were happening at the time. When one does that the empire generally doesn't come off too badly.

As for books, it's difficult because it's a huge topic and everyone has an agenda. Personally, I prefer to read biographies of people who were actually there. Churchill is great and you can find all his works here:


He would undoubtedly be pro empire though.

John Masters, Bugles and a Tiger is excellent from an army perspective.

If you wanted to get an idea of the other side then Burmese Days by Orwell is good.

I also recommend George MacDonald Fraser's Flashman series, although works of fiction, they are well researched and provide a glimpse of the darker parts of empire.

Niall Ferguson is modern historian and his outlook is more economic but worth checking out.

If you have a kindle you can get a lot of this stuff from b-ok.org
 
My bold, so very true, as in my experience of Africa, the "woke" generation are often descendants of the sort of people that became missionaries in Africa and who begged the British Govt. to send out troops to guard them & their native flocks from other nasty African chiefs or Arab slave traders.
Our history has been so distorted/rewritten to suit the "woke" mentality, especially over Slavery, where it is conveniently forgotten/overlooked that from the 1830's onwards we used our navy to try & prevent it all around the African coast!
My own Police force, the NRP fought pitched battles against slavers up until the early 20th C.
These idiots really piss me off, very few if any have first hand experience of Africa/Africans!!
One of my ancestors died trying to free black people from Arabian slavers. Slavery continued in Saudi Arabia until the 1960s.
 
Morning @Auld_Yin,
Got mine in D(sm)elhi last year, only R/s700(about six'n'thruppence;)), along with the other two titles. Been after 'The Anarchy...' and 'John Company' since I 1st heard about them. Haven't even got around to un-wrapping 'The Anarchy...' yet as both other titles are on the go along with two other books(not India related).
'Thug'(pronounced 'Tug'), is excellent reading.
I'm saving 'The Anarchy...' until last.View attachment 474087

My history master recommended this chaps novels for information of early raj india
Nightrunners of Bengal in particular.
 
If you can get hold of this there's the whole history These forces were the predecessors to the NRP which also fought the Germans in WW1
This link gives you some details FIGHTING THE SLAVERS
sorry amazon link not showing any chance of a title and author?
 

4(T)

LE
Jan Morris' "Pax Britannica" trilogy is worth a read.

Heaven's Command
Pax Britannica
Farewell the Trumpets
 

4(T)

LE
One of my ancestors died trying to free black people from Arabian slavers. Slavery continued in Saudi Arabia until the 1960s.

My father worked for the UN in East Africa in the 60s and 70s.

Apart from his normal job, there was also some sort of secretive voluntary unit tasked with gathering data about tribal practices (cannibalism, etc) and slavery. I'm not sure if this unit was sponsored by the UN and its agencies, or by western embassies, but it was staffed only by anglosphere (Brit, Can, Aus, NZ, US) and one or two Skando countries.

IIRC they had loads of photo evidence of slave convoys (in Mercedes trucks) en route from central and west Africa up to the horn of Africa.
 
My bold, so very true, as in my experience of Africa, the "woke" generation are often descendants of the sort of people that became missionaries in Africa and who begged the British Govt. to send out troops to guard them & their native flocks from other nasty African chiefs or Arab slave traders.
Our history has been so distorted/rewritten to suit the "woke" mentality, especially over Slavery, where it is conveniently forgotten/overlooked that from the 1830's onwards we used our navy to try & prevent it all around the African coast!
My own Police force, the NRP fought pitched battles against slavers up until the early 20th C.
These idiots really piss me off, very few if any have first hand experience of Africa/Africans!!
Morning @ex-colonial,
Ref: The slavery bit of your post. Had that very 'discussion' with a w@nk/'woke' person earlier today.
I insisted they 'Google' certain parts of their 'truth'.
Cue one now educated but pissed off 'w@nk' person:).

E2a: Removed an un-intentional ? Added '....'. Changed, a to @.
 
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My history master recommended this chaps novels for information of early raj india
Nightrunners of Bengal in particular.
Morning @ex_colonial,
Haven't read a novel since ?, but until 4 days ago(blame Covid), I had an un-read copy of 'Catch-22' on my limited bookshelf, which I bought from 1 of the 2 book limited shops here, about 7 years ago.
Will check out his recommendations. Thanks.
 

ydb

Swinger
Awesome thanks guys will definitely have a read of a few of them suggested sources, need to finish my uni dissertation first though haha. Good to get a bit more of balanced view, biased historians aren't worth reading imo.

Cheers!
 
sorry amazon link not showing any chance of a title and author?
The History of the Northern Rhodesia Police Paperback – 1 Nov. 2001



by Tim B. Wright (Author)
This is the first comprehensive account of this unique colonial force, from its roots in the last decade of the nineteenth century and supression of the Slave Trade , to the birth of the Republic of Zambia, in the shadow of the Lumpa rebellion of 1964. Until 1932 the police were Northern Rhodesia's first line of defence, and the author extensively covers the NRP's service in the East African Campaign of 1914-1918. The author shows how, from early days, the aim was to build a modern civil police force and how, despite wars and recession, this was achieved. Accounts of criminal investigations and civil disturbances after 1932 illustrate the different, but equally crucial, role that the force played in these tumultuous years. With comprehensive biographical details of officers of the force and many of the officials, settlers, politicians and military personnel mentioned in the text, this history should be read by anyone interested in colonial administration, the military and police history of the British Empire in Africa, medal collectors and anyone who has lived in or has connections with Zambia.
 
I consider the African missionaries of old to be no different than the idiot backpackers that go to places I wouldn't be seen dead in for their gap years. I often wonder if it's purely naive stupidity/ignorance, or whether there's an element of courage in there? I'm surprised more don't disappear.

Travelling to Darkest Africa on a voyage of discovery is one thing. Going with the intention of converting the indigenous population to Christianity is borderline mental. I wonder if anyone has done a study on the casualty rate for missionaries in Africa? My gut feeling is that survivability wasn't particularly high, initially at any rate.
 

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