The American 1st Cavalry Divisions History

#1
I thought that I would post this website link here, for those in the UK that served in Iraq, along side this division and may have an interest in it's history, etc. In any case, there are a lot of interesting things on site for military people to look at.

http://www.first-team.us/journals/
 
#4
Love the way it talks about the US Cavalry protecting settlers moving west into "largely unsettled territory" and "pioneering settlers" clinging to THEIR land in the face of attacks from Indians.

Funny thing, that. I was always under the impression that the Indians were on that land first and that the settlers and military stole it from them.
 
#5
CarpeDiem said:
Love the way it talks about the US Cavalry protecting settlers moving west into "largely unsettled territory" and "pioneering settlers" clinging to THEIR land in the face of attacks from Indians.

Funny thing, that. I was always under the impression that the Indians were on that land first and that the settlers and military stole it from them.
Details...mere details CarpeDiem.

Or 'history, smistory' as our Colonial cousins would no doubt say.
 
#6
Funny thing, that. I was always under the impression that the Indians were on that land first and that the settlers and military stole it from them.

We did, which is fortunate for both our nations as it afforded us the opportunity to become the industrial power-house we grew to be in the 1940's.
 
#8
John_Mosby said:
Funny thing, that. I was always under the impression that the Indians were on that land first and that the settlers and military stole it from them.

We did, which is fortunate for both our nations as it afforded us the opportunity to become the industrial power-house we grew to be in the 1940's.
Ohhhhhhhh

So it was for their own good that they were evicted from their lands, had their food stocks annihilated, women and children massacred, life style and culture destroyed and ended up stuck on tiny packets of land where once they roamed freely across the entire continent???
 
#9
CarpeDiem said:
John_Mosby said:
Funny thing, that. I was always under the impression that the Indians were on that land first and that the settlers and military stole it from them.

We did, which is fortunate for both our nations as it afforded us the opportunity to become the industrial power-house we grew to be in the 1940's.
Ohhhhhhhh

So it was for their own good that they were evicted from their lands, had their food stocks annihilated, women and children massacred, life style and culture destroyed and ended up stuck on tiny packets of land where once they roamed freely across the entire continent???
Yes. In return we gave them Casinos and Oklahoma. Fair trade.
 
#10
Trip_Wire said:
I thought that I would post this website link here, for those in the UK that served in Iraq, along side this division and may have an interest in it's history, etc. In any case, there are a lot of interesting things on site for military people to look at.

http://www.first-team.us/journals/
Why would ANYONE in the British Army who served along side this armoured clusterfcuk on tracks want to know anymore other than that banjo players are not only to be found in canoeing films!
 
#12
LineDoggie wrote: by the way when did Para's come into being?

Winston Churchill began the process that brought about the birth of the British Airborne movement when he issued his famous instruction to General Sir Hastings Ismay, his Chief of Staff in the War Cabinet Secretariat, on the 22nd June 1940:

"We ought to have a corps of at least 5,000 parachute troops, including a proportion of Australians, New Zealanders and Canadians, together with some trustworthy people from Norway and France. I hear something is being done already to form such a corps but only, I believe, on a very small scale. Advantage must be taken of the summer to train these forces, who can none the less play their part meanwhile as shock troops in home defence. Pray let me have a note from the War Office on the subject."

Another quote:

Whenever the maroon beret is seen on the battlefield, it at once inspires confidence, for its wearers are known to be good men and true"

Field Marshall Lord Montgomery

Didn't the 1st Cavalry stage a "Combat Refusal" in Viet Nam?

(In England we call it a mutiny)
 
#13
CarpeDiem said:
John_Mosby said:
Funny thing, that. I was always under the impression that the Indians were on that land first and that the settlers and military stole it from them.

We did, which is fortunate for both our nations as it afforded us the opportunity to become the industrial power-house we grew to be in the 1940's.
Ohhhhhhhh

So it was for their own good that they were evicted from their lands, had their food stocks annihilated, women and children massacred, life style and culture destroyed and ended up stuck on tiny packets of land where once they roamed freely across the entire continent???
Don't forget the blankets they were given- contaminated with Smallpox.
 
#14
crabtastic said:
CarpeDiem said:
John_Mosby said:
Funny thing, that. I was always under the impression that the Indians were on that land first and that the settlers and military stole it from them.

We did, which is fortunate for both our nations as it afforded us the opportunity to become the industrial power-house we grew to be in the 1940's.
Ohhhhhhhh

So it was for their own good that they were evicted from their lands, had their food stocks annihilated, women and children massacred, life style and culture destroyed and ended up stuck on tiny packets of land where once they roamed freely across the entire continent???
Don't forget the blankets they were given- contaminated with Smallpox.
For the record, I believe that was done by the British Military when the states were still colonies.

Anyway, while not exactly the finest hour of the US, it is something that can never be undone. All we can do is make movies that show the Indians killing Custer over and over again.
 
#15
Kevin is right:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Population_history_of_American_indigenous_peoples

Deliberate infection?

One of the most contentious issues relating to disease and depopulation in the Americas concerns the degree to which American indigenous peoples were intentionally infected with diseases such as smallpox. Despite some legends to the contrary, there seems to be no evidence that the Spanish ever attempted to deliberately infect the American natives.[8]

However, there is at least one documented incident in which British soldiers in North America attempted to intentionally infect native people. During Pontiac's Rebellion in 1763, a number of Native Americans launched a widespread war against British soldiers and settlers in an attempt to drive the British out of the Great Lakes region. In what is now western Pennsylvania, Native Americans (primarily Delawares) laid siege to Fort Pitt on June 22, 1763. Surrounded and isolated, and with over 200 women and children in the fort, the commander of Fort Pitt gave representatives of the besieging Delawares two blankets that had been exposed to smallpox in an attempt to infect the natives and end the siege.

British General Jeffrey Amherst is usually associated with this incident, and although he suggested this tactic in a letter to a subordinate, by that time the commander at Fort Pitt had already made the attempt. While it is certain that these officers attempted to intentionally infect American Indians with smallpox, it is uncertain whether or not the attempt was successful. Because many natives in the area died from smallpox in 1763, some writers have concluded that the attempt was indeed a success. A number of recent scholars, however, have noted that evidence for connecting the blanket incident with the smallpox outbreak is doubtful, and that the disease was more likely spread by native warriors returning from attacks on infected white settlements.

[9]
A disputed incident is Ward Churchill's claim that in 1837 the United States Army deliberately infected Mandan Indians by distributing blankets that had been exposed to smallpox. Most other historians who have looked at the same event disagree with Churchill's interpretation of the historical evidence, and believe no deliberate introduction occurred at this time and place.

http://hal.lamar.edu/~browntf/Churchill1.htm
 
#16
Crabtastic, Yes, I do remember the lectures we both sat through at univ on the origins of germ warfare and yes, I remember who was responsible and in no way do I condone that action.

However, it was completely irrelevant to the point of my post which was in reference to the US Cavalry's website.
 
#17
So it was for their own good that they were evicted from their lands, had their food stocks annihilated, women and children massacred, life style and culture destroyed and ended up stuck on tiny packets of land where once they roamed freely across the entire continent???
Actually, it was for OUR own good as a new nation, which is, unfortunately a lesson lost to many governments.

Civilizations change and evolve, sometimes violently so, and the aquisition or loss of traditional territory and culture is just a part of change. Trying to moralize change is pointless, as anything that has been done in the past can have it's roots traced to practices done even further in the past. One can only hope to be on the winning side of change, but that is not always the case.
 
#18
John_Mosby said:
So it was for their own good that they were evicted from their lands, had their food stocks annihilated, women and children massacred, life style and culture destroyed and ended up stuck on tiny packets of land where once they roamed freely across the entire continent???
Actually, it was for OUR own good as a new nation, which is, unfortunately a lesson lost to many governments.

Civilizations change and evolve, sometimes violently so, and the aquisition or loss of traditional territory and culture is just a part of change. Trying to moralize change is pointless, as anything that has been done in the past can have it's roots traced to practices done even further in the past. One can only hope to be on the winning side of change, but that is not always the case.
It's all about the Liebensraum!!!

Remember this?

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.
...as long as you're white.
 
#19
In 1492 (ish) Christopher Columbus discovered America.
This was a complete surprise to the Indians who had been living there for thousands of years.
 

Auld-Yin

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#20
Trip_Wire said:
Kevin is right:
Kev - this must be a seminal moment for you. You should be so proud that you have put up a post which has not been sabotaged byTW, but has agreed with you.

Well done 8)

(I think)
 

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