The 6 O'Clock swill ie Licensing hours in NZ for 50 years.

#61
Whereas in New Zealand - Auckland (Waikaraka park - which was very boggy) - we just coughed up mud. Risk assessments? Bah!

edited to add: I am really surprised that some kids didn't drown there, whilst playing rugby.
Waikaraka Park with the stone wall around and the cemetery.
I told you we were bros and that was Dad walking down Queen St with his supplies.
I grew up in Mangere Bridge and went to Onehunga High and then left to go for a solja.
 
#64
Waikaraka Park with the stone wall around and the cemetery.
I told you we were bros and that was Dad walking down Queen St with his supplies.
I grew up in Mangere Bridge and went to Onehunga High and then left to go for a solja.
We lived next to Penrose High School in Ellersile/Penrose; moved to Mangere Bridge when 15. My father's business was in Nielson Street. And that photo was taken before Queen Street was controversially pedestrianised in the early 1970s.

Left NZ in 1990 on transfer to the RAF.

And , of course, 'them' moved into the ITTS Hanger at Hobsonville, from Papakura, about then.
 
#65
Waikaraka Park with the stone wall around and the cemetery.
I told you we were bros and that was Dad walking down Queen St with his supplies.
I grew up in Mangere Bridge and went to Onehunga High and then left to go for a solja.
Crack up, small world. I grew in Mangere Bridge till Intermediate age (Manukau Intermediate) and then moved to the other side of Mangere Mountain, to the more "Colorful" Mangere proper.
 
#66
This may be an urban myth but in the eighties Aberdeen City voted to allow pubs to decide which 12 hours in a day to open, the argument being that it being a port city there was always sailor types with time off looking for a pub at weird hours. It was voted so and in the 80's there was always a pub open round the quay sides.
It later transpired that the vote carried due to out-of-chamber discussions, the logic was that if there was always a pub open there would be no drunks littering the focal areas and thus making the City look civilised. Clever idea. If true.

On the subject of 70's opening hours, I remember going with mates and hanging round the pubs at chucking out time around 6 o'clock and, like the NZ topic, the streets would become busy with happy or aggressive drunks. The happy ones would hand out cash while the entertainment came with the aggressive types punching lumps out of each other. Ahhhh, the 70's. The sky was bluer, the winters were snowier it never rained during school holidays.
I remember in Aberdeen city centre, must have been around summer 1980 or 81, pubs only selling shorts and mixer drinks in the last half hour before the 11PM kick out. That wasn't a recipe for disaster at all.
 
#68
Simple theory, “we didn’t go through all that over there so you miserable bastards can tell us not to have a drink”
Which is also why for years the legal drinking age was 20, except in the military, where it was 18, “old enough to fight, old enough to drink”.
Now, where did I leave my liver?
That always cracked me up. As a young 18yr old Soldier in the 90's, I could drink all I wanted at the Baggies bar in camp but wasn't even allowed into a bar/club in town at night. At least it did lead to some entertaining adventures and exploits with my Section and Platoon plotting how to get the 3 or 4 baby faced guys into bars. A few became solid life skills for use later on.
 
#70
Rugby in mud fooking luxury. My local pitch is "Black patch" grass on top of coal slag, go home like a miner as a minor.
Later in my school days, we moved to the coast. And started wearing boots.
Go on tour 'to the Old Transvaal', and back to what was described above - rock hard pitches etc.
Try playing a full game on concrete-like ground with six or eight x 1" studs.
 
#71
Later in my school days, we moved to the coast. And started wearing boots.
Go on tour 'to the Old Transvaal', and back to what was described above - rock hard pitches etc.
Try playing a full game on concrete-like ground with six or eight x 1" studs.
Coal has ummmmm edges and not soft! When back home will get a picture of the pitch, WRU sanctioned matches still played on it. Rain makes it softer but you get stinking.
 
#72
Coal has ummmmm edges and not soft! When back home will get a picture of the pitch, WRU sanctioned matches still played on it. Rain makes it softer but you get stinking.
Yep.
I played on a 'cinder' based pitch once. Old railway town. Field got torn up after a whole day of matches and rain. We were rolling about in what looked like lava!
And you tell the young people of today that etc etc etc
 
#74
See them in the bar after and..................... laugh :)
I had a book once - dunno what happened to it - of local rugby anecdotes.
Lots of bar stories.
One involved a visiting team in a pretty rough part of SA in the 60s.
Big irish bloke playing tighthead for the visitors.
Home side decides to 'soften him up'.
Every scrum, bang-bang-bang.
This lad does nowt.
Afterwards, in the bar, the lad walks in - sandals and habit! He's a 'brother' teaching at one of the de la salle schools.
Says to the opposite number 'All afternoon, I've been turning this (points to cheek)... Now I'm not going to."
 
#75
I had a book once - dunno what happened to it - of local rugby anecdotes.
Lots of bar stories.
One involved a visiting team in a pretty rough part of SA in the 60s.
Big irish bloke playing tighthead for the visitors.
Home side decides to 'soften him up'.
Every scrum, bang-bang-bang.
This lad does nowt.
Afterwards, in the bar, the lad walks in - sandals and habit! He's a 'brother' teaching at one of the de la salle schools.
Says to the opposite number 'All afternoon, I've been turning this (points to cheek)... Now I'm not going to."
A habit and sandals good bit of pulling kit when commando(not marine type) it works miracles.
 
#76
Under 21 rugby in Auckland, played for Glenfield. We started with 32 in the squad and near season end we’re strugling to field a team with injuries.

4 of us were told not to play rugby again, 20minutes lying still thinking my neck was broken convinced me. Never played again, went and joined the military six months later, but never played rugby.

Takapuna had a hard mongrel on the wing, one Frank Bunce, Glenfield under 20 team had a cracker by the name of Walter Little.

Happy days across the years bumping into them at various bars and inevitable hangovers following.
 
#77
I lived in Geraldine, South Island, for a year in 2005/2006 after I broke up with the missus and ejected from Sydney. Coming from the big smoke it was a total contrast, people didn't lock their doors at night and you'd see things that were from yesteryear like old style pint milk bottles. I found a few nice little pubs and some good beers (Speights and Monteiths I liked). My uncle (ex RNZAF) showed me around the RSAs, and I had the privilege to drink with some of his WW2 mates, some of whom had seen places like Sidi Barrani and El Alamein, and Yugoslavia as well (on the run after the Italian armistice). Quiet, but lovely people, lovely countryside and tramping (bushwalking) paradise, a good place to enjoy.
 
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