Army Rumour Service

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

The 6 O'Clock swill ie Licensing hours in NZ for 50 years.

D

Deleted 60082

Guest
A passing Kiwi tells me that there was a referendum on this topic with every General Election up to 1987, which really is quite astounding
As I mentioned in my post above, the referendum was held at each General Election and local body elections. As a joke, I think I did vote for Prohibition once.
 
In my view, Uk pub opening hours weren't that much more liberal before they were modernised. There were some regional differences. Scotland for example took a more realistic approach to afternoon drinking. I recall going into an Edinburgh pub and think I possibly had 20 minutes to get two or three pints down my neck only to find that the pub wasn't closing for the afternoon like it's English equivalents did back across the border.

In London, pub opening hours were 11am until 2.30pm and the they reopened at 6pm until 11pm Monday to Saturday. Sunday hours were even more restrictive with midday until 2pm and 7pm until 10.30pm licensed hours.

People did binge drink. Sunday lunchtimes were almost a national sport to get as much drink consumed before the final bell. Hours in most pubs were rigidly enforced partly because it was the law but also because it was the knocking off time for bar staff who wanted to go home. The arguments I've witnessed between a pissed customer and bar men and bar maids over having an extra minute or two to drink up the last couple of inches of beer still in the glass.

In 1973, I was posted to Germany where bars were mostly open all day and only closed when the last customer had decided at 4am that they had finally had enough to drink and staggered out of the door. It was a first in a lifetime experience to walk into a bar in daylight, watch darkness set in through the windows as you and your mates were enjoying yourselves and yet when you finally left the bar, it was daylight again. And of course, you quickly discovered that most of Europe was like that.

It was an enormous change when the laws on UK drinking hours were finally liberalised. There were still limits on closing in the evenings but these were set by local authorities who decided on a case by case basis depending on the license application submitted by each pub etc. Most of them were extended until midnight or 1am and of course, nobody was forced to close in the afternoons anymore even on Sundays.

Is the health of the nation any worse off than before? I don't think so! There aren't groups of drunks wandering around our towns causing trouble. Of course you will always get some individuals who will not be able to drink sensibly but the vast majority of people drink responsibly, at least more responsibly than when the law obliged them to have to vacate pubs arbitrarily.

6pm closing does seem pretty draconian but we didn't have it that much better.

I was always baffled by the opposition to opening up the licencing laws in the UK.
I was trying to explain to a young lad in a pub the other week what it was like when pubs called last orders at 11pm and people tried to down 2 or 3 pints in the final half hour before an entire towns drinking population were put out on the streets all trying to get food and taxis at the same time.
And they wondered why there was trouble on the streets!
I remember when there used to loads of police on the streets at kicking out time to take care of the inevitable fights. Now I see about 4 and very rarely is there trouble now.
Since then people can spread out their drinking. Gone has the power drinking that went on before.
Many still drink the same amount but can spread it out until midnight and not have to fight for a ride home.
It seems like an age ago now, but we are much better off now than then.
 
This may be an urban myth but in the eighties Aberdeen City voted to allow pubs to decide which 12 hours in a day to open, the argument being that it being a port city there was always sailor types with time off looking for a pub at weird hours. It was voted so and in the 80's there was always a pub open round the quay sides.
It later transpired that the vote carried due to out-of-chamber discussions, the logic was that if there was always a pub open there would be no drunks littering the focal areas and thus making the City look civilised. Clever idea. If true.

On the subject of 70's opening hours, I remember going with mates and hanging round the pubs at chucking out time around 6 o'clock and, like the NZ topic, the streets would become busy with happy or aggressive drunks. The happy ones would hand out cash while the entertainment came with the aggressive types punching lumps out of each other. Ahhhh, the 70's. The sky was bluer, the winters were snowier it never rained during school holidays.
 

Ripiznutzov

Old-Salt
A rather nice lady I went out with when I was 18, early 80’s had an interesting older than normal father.

He couldn’t get out of the habit of buying a couple of crates once a week, and drinking them at home of an evening.

He would sit in the kitchen chair and drink quietly, the disconcerting thing was every twenty or so seconds his eyes would roll up and scan the roof.

The GF explained finally he had been in Burma, and when he drank he started looking for snipers automatically.

Hell of a nice guy once you got used to it.
 
Areas of Wales still Sunday dry until 1996. Until the 2003 act if 500 voters asked for it, the area had to have a ballot on Sunday drinking. Non-conformistism and Methordism run deep in Wales.

BBC News - Time called on drink ban rule @Blogg later in Wales.


Those bastards in Anglesey voted against Sunday opening, because they enjoyed watching the english twats trudging past the social clubs in the pissing rain, while they enjoyed tenteen pints inside.
 
Those bastards in Anglesey voted against Sunday opening, because they enjoyed watching the english twats trudging past the social clubs in the pissing rain, while they enjoyed tenteen pints inside.
The locals went on a bus to "dog shows" over the border.
Years back one of the valley villages found a way for a Sunday drink. I think they hit on the dog show lark and thirsty traveller loop hole. Apparently the village was rammed by outsiders!
 

gafkiwi

War Hero
After 1994, all the 'old' laws went out the window.
24 hr a day boozing? No problem!
They tightened em up a few years back, though - hrs now 11am til wee-small hours. Some places licensed til 3am.
When you saw 'happy hour' from 10-11am, you worried. Double brandy and coke, only....
I remember being a young baggie (private) in the mid 90's getting kicked out of a bar in Palmy and walking out into morning sunlight. Quite happy they reigned that in. Some years later being a Pl Sgt, I was quite happy the guys got kicked out of bars before 3am and had a little time to eat Mac D's and sober up before I had to deal with them.
 
...I remember kids at primary school arriving, deathly pale, from the UK, having come out on immigrant ships such as the Rangitoto, and wearing shoes!...

No shoes here either till well into the teens. Rugger was played barefoot until about 14 or so, clutching a full size ball with both arms and trying to see over it while running. Got my first pair of shoes aged about ten or eleven and hated them. Still do.
 
In those days, the actual bars themselves were long generally wooden topped cabinet type pieces of furniture and a lot of the drinkers leaned on the bar (all the better to be served quicker). There were areas cordon off by rails, so drinkers not at the bar could be served unhindered. You would get served, then had to move away so the next drinker could move in.
The beer was poured into a heavy glass container known as a jug, of about 1.75lt, and then drunk from a glass.
There were two uses for the jug, first as a container for beer, then it was often used as a weapon, either thrown or used as a striking instrument. Deadly in all three guises as they were extremely heavy, think Once Were Warriors type behaviour, (nowadays they are made from a light plastic). Every town had a pub or pubs known as the flying jug.

The beer was delivered to the pub in bulk, by large tankers (think petrol tankers) and you would be close. It was stored in the pub basement in large vats until it was imbibed. The tanker would do a delivery of thousands of litres every four or five days, depending on the popularity of the pub.

In the bar, the beer was dispensed into glasses and jugs by a barman/maid via a long plastic hose with a tap on the end. They would start at one end of the bar as far as the hose would reach and just pour beer as fast as they could while pouring, taking the cash/giving change etc, down to the other end as far as the hose would reach.

There was at least one other barman doing the same thing from the other end. Once the hoses reached their extent, the would move back, doing the same thing in the direction from whence they came.

Rinse and repeat until the doors were slammed shut behind the mob on the way out.
Last beer was poured at 6pm, and the punters had 15 minutes to drink what they had and be out the door.

Then the fun started.
 
A dit.

1965 time, in a very small country town, one pub, one off license attached to the pub.
You could buy beer to take away in glass flagons containing 2.25lt of the amber liquid.
Five flagons would fit into a standard sized wooden crate that had once contained a dozen 750ml bottles.
A flagon, from memory would cost 2/6?. It doesn't sound much now, but it was a lot of money then.
Anyway, one Saturday evening, just before 6pm, a maori woman was obviously detailed to go into the bottle shop and fill the flagons for the nights party.

This mission she successfully completed and it was exactly 6pm as she staggered out the door.
As she left, the door was shut behind her and locked and barred.
She took two or three steps onto the footpath and the bottom fell out of the crate allowing the flagons to fall onto the pavement and all broke. There was piss and glass everywhere.

It was a major catastrophe as she could not at that time get them replaced.
She upended the crate, sat on it and started crying.
I should imagine that she received the bash for her efforts that night.
 
Last edited:
D

Deleted 60082

Guest
No shoes here either till well into the teens. Rugger was played barefoot until about 14 or so, clutching a full size ball with both arms and trying to see over it while running. Got my first pair of shoes aged about ten or eleven and hated them. Still do.
Absolutely the same for me. Found my Standard 4 (aged 10) Rugby Team photograph recently: cross legged, bare feet, all had skinned knees, and the captain clutching a full sized ball.

40 years on my wife still goes bonkers at me going around the house/garden/out to the car in bare feet. My son is now in Auckland and beginning to learn to do the same.
 
D

Deleted 60082

Guest
In those days, the actual bars themselves were long generally wooden topped cabinet type pieces of furniture and a lot of the drinkers leaned on the bar (all the better to be served quicker). There were areas cordon off by rails, so drinkers not at the bar could be served unhindered. You would get served, then had to move away so the next drinker could move in.
The beer was poured into a heavy glass container known as a jug, of about 1.75lt, and then drunk from a glass.
There were two uses for the jug, first as a container for beer, then it was often used as a weapon, either thrown or used as a striking instrument. Deadly in all three guises as they were extremely heavy, think Once Were Warriors type behaviour, (nowadays they are made from a light plastic). Every town had a pub or pubs known as the flying jug.

The beer was delivered to the pub in bulk, by large tankers (think petrol tankers) and you would be close. It was stored in the pub basement in large vats until it was imbibed. The tanker would do a delivery of thousands of litres every four or five days, depending on the popularity of the pub.

In the bar, the beer was dispensed into glasses and jugs by a barman/maid via a long plastic hose with a tap on the end. They would start at one end of the bar as far as the hose would reach and just pour beer as fast as they could while pouring, taking the cash/giving change etc, down to the other end as far as the hose would reach.

There was at least one other barman doing the same thing from the other end. Once the hoses reached their extent, the would move back, doing the same thing in the direction from whence they came.

Rinse and repeat until the doors were slammed shut behind the mob on the way out.
Last beer was poured at 6pm, and the punters had 15 minutes to drink what they had and be out the door.

Then the fun started.
I have a jug which I collected in my student days in Auckland; tends to be used for Pimms these days.

Interesting to think how crap a lot of those bulk beers from Lion and DB (Dominion Breweries) must have been, compared with the plethora of craft beers (starting with Mack's 30 years ago) that are now available. Do DB and Lion still do the quart bottles?


 
Ex GF would throw a wobbler whenever she asked me to grab something from the market and I came bimbling back in barefoot while clutching said item. She wasn't even there so no idea why so traumatised. Took to checking me for shoes before going out but didn't stop me kicking them off under the table or in the car.

Sat here right now typing this, rugger shorts, one bollock swinging gently in the breeze and shoeless.

Internet cafe owner doesn't look happy...
 
D

Deleted 60082

Guest
A dit.

1965 time, in a very small country town, one pub, one off license attached to the pub.
You could buy beer to take away in glass flagons containing 2.25lt of the amber liquid.
Five flagons would fit into a standard sized wooden crate that had once contained a dozen 750ml bottles.
A flagon, from memory would cost 2/6?. I doesn't sound much now, but it was a lot of money then.
Anyway, one Saturday evening, just before 6pm, a maori woman was obviously detailed to go into the bottle shop and fill the flagons for the nights party.

This mission she successfully completed and it was exactly 6pm as she staggered out the door.
As she left, the door was shut behind her and locked and barred.
She took two or three steps onto the footpath and the bottom fell out of the crate allowing the flagons to fall onto the pavement and all broke. There was piss and glass everywhere.

It was a major catastrophe as she could not at that time get them replaced.
She upended the crate, sat on it and started crying.
I should imagine that she received the bash for her efforts that night.
1957 - a chap on a typical NZ street with four flagons:
 

gafkiwi

War Hero
I have a jug which I collected in my student days in Auckland; tends to be used for Pimms these days.

Interesting to think how crap a lot of those bulk beers from Lion and DB (Dominion Breweries) must have been, compared with the plethora of craft beers (starting with Mack's 30 years ago) that are now available. Do DB and Lion still do the quart bottles?


Yup, they're still alive and kicking. They still the measure of a big shot with coin to spare in a lot of towns on the East Coast.
 
I have a jug which I collected in my student days in Auckland; tends to be used for Pimms these days.

Interesting to think how crap a lot of those bulk beers from Lion and DB (Dominion Breweries) must have been, compared with the plethora of craft beers (starting with Mack's 30 years ago) that are now available. Do DB and Lion still do the quart bottles?



That crate you showed was the one that held the 5 flagons that I spoke about in another dit.

I think that you can get those sized bottles still, but I don't think they are as popular now.
There is a programme running in bottle stores called swap a crate.
 
Top