That went well

Just because he has worked with the police for years doesn't mean that every officer in the force would know him. I am in a similar sized force and couldn't tell you who our race relations advisors are, let alone recognise them in the street.
My other observation is that race relations.....indeed police/public relations is a two way street. I fully accept that no citizen is obliged to give their details to the police, but, 22 years of service tell me that most people are happy to.....particularly if it prevents them being arrested.
I don't think this officer handled the incident particularly well, but neither did Mr Adunbi.
Being a bit of a devils advocate:
I agree that he could have given his details, but both parties knew he didn't need to.
My thoughts on this situation is that if the female officer hadnt been involved and a more 'useful' male or female officer had been on scene the chap would have been detained for a search or similar and would have been secured/cuffed without the need for the taser.
 
Why is identifying yourself to a police officer a big problem? Why is submitting to a stop and search such a big problem? If you a are a honest citizen co-operate and get on with the rest of your day, it would appear to me that you either have something to hide or you're just being a left wing self righteous cock.
 
they only zapped him coz e woz a darkie.
they only employed him for the same reason.
shame it wasn't in America.
stupid people win stupid prizes. compo lottery player i suspect.
 
So you don't think the literally hundred of racial tension situations he sorted out count for anythng, of the years he spent working with the police as a race relations officer count for anything, or the work he did in the local community to improve the area?

Its worth remembering that Bristol has had some very nasty race riots in the past, but thanks to efforts from people like the chap in the video tensions have dropped massively and the police and local black communities have much closer ties..................he spent years working with the police to improve his community.
Perhaps you can have a guess as to whether this incident helped or hindered race relations with the police ;)
That sort of "community " tosser needs to be slapped down, and then slapped down again. Perhaps in that way the "entitled" will learn some responsibility towards the host country. At some point they must learn that they are here under sufference and they are not generally welcomed.
 
Why is identifying yourself to a police officer a big problem?
Because it's not required and any policeman acting as if it is is exceeding their powers.

Why is submitting to a stop and search such a big problem?
Because it's a pain in the arse when it happens repeatedly to perfectly innocent people.

If you a are a honest citizen co-operate and get on with the rest of your day, it would appear to me that you either have something to hide or you're just being a left wing self righteous cock.
If you've nothing to hide, you've nothing to fear? That's not an accurate reflection of real life.
 
That sort of "community " tosser needs to be slapped down, and then slapped down again. Perhaps in that way the "entitled" will learn some responsibility towards the host country. At some point they must learn that they are here under sufference and they are not generally welcomed.
Not welcomed by racist twats I supposed.
Are you one of those?
 
Being a bit of a devils advocate:
I agree that he could have given his details, but both parties knew he didn't need to.
My thoughts on this situation is that if the female officer hadnt been involved and a more 'useful' male or female officer had been on scene the chap would have been detained for a search or similar and would have been secured/cuffed without the need for the taser.
On what grounds would they detain him for a search or “similar”, whatever that means?
 
On what grounds would they detain him for a search or “similar”, whatever that means?
On the same 'grounds' they were insisting he gave his details, and the same grounds they entered his property and eventually tasered him.

I didn't say what they should have done but rather what they could have done.
Sorry if you thought I was quoting lawful procedure as part of my devil's advocate.

When I worked with young offenders I also noted the 'punch in the face' tactic that a few police used in similar circumstances wasn't correct proceedure earlier :)
 
Excellent to see that after being cleared at court of any criminal offence, the officer in question had also been cleared of Gross Misconduct.

Taser PC cleared of misconduct

Interesting and predictable to see the paragraph near the end:

Mr Adunbi's lawyer, Tony Murphy, said his client had been "allowed limited involvement" in the proceedings, and he would "play a full and active part" in civil proceedings, which he will now pursue against the force.
 
Great, Avon and Somerset have said the officer did nothing wrong, but have now made several procedure changes to make sure nothing like this happens again!

Why go to the time and expense to make changes if the officer acted correctly.

Bearing in mind she said on oath that she felt in danger (while her partner simply stood much closer next to the suspect and didn't feel in danger) maybe she should swap to a job like a lollypop lady or something.
 
Interesting and predictable to see the paragraph near the end:

Mr Adunbi's lawyer, Tony Murphy, said his client had been "allowed limited involvement" in the proceedings, and he would "play a full and active part" in civil proceedings, which he will now pursue against the force.
There'll be a sting in the tail to that ……...
 
Great, Avon and Somerset have said the officer did nothing wrong, but have now made several procedure changes to make sure nothing like this happens again!

Why go to the time and expense to make changes if the officer acted correctly.

Bearing in mind she said on oath that she felt in danger (while her partner simply stood much closer next to the suspect and didn't feel in danger) maybe she should swap to a job like a lollypop lady or something.
A & S took her to a Gross Misconduct hearing after she was cleared at a court of anything criminal. It’s the usual way with the police, 2 attempts to get you. She was found not guilty at both, I will accept that and hopefully after 18 months of being no doubt stressed out and apparently abused on social media, she can get on with her job.

The court and the hearing said she did nothing wrong, not A & S or The IOPC.
 
Whether he was or wasn't cooperative is irrelevant, the police don't have the right to expect cooperation, nor does lack of cooperation give them any additional powers - we don't live in America yet:
My bold but I think you would be surprised at the rights American citizens have when stopped by the Police while walking down the street. Police can ask for your name and you must give it (that's in some States where I live you don't) they can not ask for ID or ask you to prove that is your name. You can also tell them that you do not wish to speak to them and calmly walk away.

If they tell you to stop you must stop, you may ask if you are being detained and ask why and they must tell you why. You do not have to consent to a search or answer any questions they put to you. Finally the Police better have a damn good reason for stopping you in the first place.
 
A & S took her to a Gross Misconduct hearing after she was cleared at a court of anything criminal. It’s the usual way with the police, 2 attempts to get you. She was found not guilty at both, I will accept that and hopefully after 18 months of being no doubt stressed out and apparently abused on social media, she can get on with her job.

The court and the hearing said she did nothing wrong, not A & S or The IOPC.
How much of this story are you seeing or hearing?
As I've alluded to before, this is local to me and I thought she was no good on the streets before this event happened.

Perhaps you haven't seen or heard the comments from A and S.
 

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