That went well

I was once told a long time ago, that with human rights comes human responsibilities. Unfortunately not enshrined in legislation.

Trite argument . Human rights protect individual people from the excesses of the state. Where it's people with rights weighed against other people with rights you don't need responsibility to tip the scales.





Wets.
Actually it's....You do not have to say anything. But, it may harm your defence if you do not mention when questioned something which you later rely on in court. Anything you do say may be given in evidence.”
I have to put my hands up to that one and take it on the chin I suppose. Hopefully it's less volts than than a Brizzle Rasta.

though same shit - different words m'lud
By the way, an arrested person is under no more responsibility to provide their details than before they were arrested.

Wets.
but they can be searched, fingerprinted and DNA sampled while locked up and kept from minding their own business until their innocence is realised (usual time limits apply). That's quite a liberty to take with someone who you should still be assuming is innocent.
 
He hasn't had a haircut in 50 years. What he really needs is some of that shampoo for grotty ***** "Go & Wash"!
Or as the Old Bill probably heard in their heads, "Watch and Shoot, watch and shoot..."
 
The PC concerned was found not guilty at court today of assault.
Yes, her defence was she thought he was possibly going for a weapon, who'd have thought that the fact he had both hands on show by his sides was an indicator of that!

I'm sure she really did feel it was 'self defence' due to the fact he was some distance from her at the time and it was her closing towards him.
 
Yes, her defence was she thought he was possibly going for a weapon, who'd have thought that the fact he had both hands on show by his sides was an indicator of that!

I'm sure she really did feel it was 'self defence' due to the fact he was some distance from her at the time and it was her closing towards him.
That’s a substantially diffrent interpretation of the Police Officer’s account than that reported in the Independent.

Giving evidence at her trial, Ms Boddie said: “I was not sure it was Mr McCalla. I wanted to give him the opportunity to identify himself and calm him down.

“If he wasn’t Mr McCalla, then the incident would be resolved there and then. If a person is wanted by police, very often they will deny who they are.”

She later admitted she had met McCalla during an earlier police operation, adding: “I could not say for definite that [Mr Adunbi] was or was not him.”

In a statement made after the incident, which was read to the court, she described Mr Adunbi as “hostile from the start”.

In the witness box, she described the sequence of events as “dynamic” and “volatile”, claiming Mr Adunbi was “very agitated and angry”.

In footage captured on the officers’ body-worn cameras, Mr Adunbi can be heard becoming increasingly angry. He shouts and swears, telling them to leave him alone and it is his right to withhold his identity.

He is heard shouting: “Why you coming to torment me? Go f*** off about your business and don’t follow me. Stop, stop, if you put your hand on me I’m gonna f*** you up.

“I’m not threatening you. I’m telling you if you put arms on me I’m going to defend myself. This is not the first time you have done this.”

She said she was aware McCalla’s file had a warning for violence and weapons, so was concerned Mr Adunbi had keys in his hand.

Police sergeant who tasered her force's own race relations adviser found not guilty of assault
 
That’s a substantially diffrent interpretation of the Police Officer’s account than that reported in the Independent.

Giving evidence at her trial, Ms Boddie said: “I was not sure it was Mr McCalla. I wanted to give him the opportunity to identify himself and calm him down.

“If he wasn’t Mr McCalla, then the incident would be resolved there and then. If a person is wanted by police, very often they will deny who they are.”

She later admitted she had met McCalla during an earlier police operation, adding: “I could not say for definite that [Mr Adunbi] was or was not him.”

In a statement made after the incident, which was read to the court, she described Mr Adunbi as “hostile from the start”.

In the witness box, she described the sequence of events as “dynamic” and “volatile”, claiming Mr Adunbi was “very agitated and angry”.

In footage captured on the officers’ body-worn cameras, Mr Adunbi can be heard becoming increasingly angry. He shouts and swears, telling them to leave him alone and it is his right to withhold his identity.

He is heard shouting: “Why you coming to torment me? Go f*** off about your business and don’t follow me. Stop, stop, if you put your hand on me I’m gonna f*** you up.

“I’m not threatening you. I’m telling you if you put arms on me I’m going to defend myself. This is not the first time you have done this.”

She said she was aware McCalla’s file had a warning for violence and weapons, so was concerned Mr Adunbi had keys in his hand.
Police sergeant who tasered her force's own race relations adviser found not guilty of assault
Have you not watched the full video of the event?
 

Sixty

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She later admitted she had met McCalla during an earlier police operation, adding: “I could not say for definite that [Mr Adunbi] was or was not him.”
Her defence was 'they all look the same to me'? That has to be career-limiting.
 
Her defence was 'they all look the same to me'? That has to be career-limiting.
You would have to think that being charged and tried for assault, even if acquitted, would be equally career limiting.
 
Is the account given in the Independent report inaccurate, then?
See what you think :)
I think the female officer here is a bit crap and is more suited to office duties than being out on the streets. There are some outstanding officers in A and S police, but there are also some complete tw*ts who undo the hard work and patience that the good officers do.
Tasering a very well known race relations person who spent years working with the police to ease racial tensions in the area wasnt the best course of action here.
The chap could have given his details, but knew he didnt need to, and if you look up the details of the man the police were looking for you might think the acting sergeant needs a trip to specsavers!

As an aside, even if he had of been the man they wanted what kind of markswomen manages to hit someone in the face from that close up!!

 
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Miserable, mouthy, useless old enricher gets his just reward for being such. Ffeerrck him.
So you don't think the literally hundred of racial tension situations he sorted out count for anythng, of the years he spent working with the police as a race relations officer count for anything, or the work he did in the local community to improve the area?

Its worth remembering that Bristol has had some very nasty race riots in the past, but thanks to efforts from people like the chap in the video tensions have dropped massively and the police and local black communities have much closer ties..................he spent years working with the police to improve his community.
Perhaps you can have a guess as to whether this incident helped or hindered race relations with the police ;)
 
Just because he has worked with the police for years doesn't mean that every officer in the force would know him. I am in a similar sized force and couldn't tell you who our race relations advisors are, let alone recognise them in the street.
My other observation is that race relations.....indeed police/public relations is a two way street. I fully accept that no citizen is obliged to give their details to the police, but, 22 years of service tell me that most people are happy to.....particularly if it prevents them being arrested.
I don't think this officer handled the incident particularly well, but neither did Mr Adunbi.
 
@lastwalt

Heres another short vid of a different tasering from A and S.
The topless chap who was tasered has a learning disability. The police wanted to speak to him about something very minor.
They knew he had a learning disability, knew he was living in a sheltered/supervised scheme and there were signs explaining that CCTV was monitoring the area.
They also knew his support worker was close by but chose not to ask for the support workers help.
The chap has Autism and he says he was scared by the police and so tried to run away. The police account tells of a violent struggle that the officers sustained injuries from the man and that they used the taser to protect themselves...............see what you think :)

 

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