THAT rifle

If you had paid attention to the movie, you would see that each soldier has a personal supply of rounds in the ammunition pouches of his 1871 pattern belt equipment. Even in a confined redoubt, it would not be feasible for the QMS and his staff to be feeding individual rounds to each man (you must have noticed that the Martini-Henry is a single shot weapon too).
You are making the common error that the cyclical rate of fire of a weapon is how many rounds can be put through it in a given time (an error that the twunk P. Morgan repeats often).
It would be stupid of any Rifleman or other soldier to just keep it squeezed until empty. He would very soon cease to exist, run up the curtain and join the choir invisible instead of pinin' for the fjiords and be unable to protect his squad, gun group, fire team or wotever.
Rate of fire is largely immaterial except in the case of support weapons (my role in my gun group, squad, patrol, fire team for much of the time) in which case the rest of the squad carries extra ammunition for that weapon's operator.
Just because an assault rifle may have a rate of fire of eg. 300 rds. per minute, there is NO WAY that anybody can put 300 rds. through it in 60 seconds.

Sent from my karzi while losing several pounds
Morning @JackSofty,
My bold. Michael Palin walt.
 
I remember when they introduced this Rifle, it was seen as a bit of a wonder weapon, by the boys as you didn't have to keep feeding the rounds in, for one thing and at 7.62 it had some loverly stopping power. The only gripe i can remember was that it being based on the FN, why didn't we have full auto? SQMS used to say 'To stop you bastards from wasting ammo' Also because it was built to last, it gave you a nice sense of balance if you were going to hit somebody, as in Northern Ireland. It was also easier to use drill wise, as it fitted better into the body, less dropping the thing on shoulder arms etc.
 
The hack-saw jobs on the AR-18 and the Stoner 63 were just prototypes for testing. They should have similarly hacked up an AK-47, CAL and a Galil (too early?) they might have had some different ideas.
I thought someone must have done it.



They both look more practical than Enfield's prototypes.
 
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Mufulira

Old-Salt
Did nobody consider supplying the SMG with pointy bullets?
IIRC having a truncated conical 9mm jacketed bullet that had no issues in feeding from a Sterling magazine and provided no end of conspiracy theories about being able to knock off 'Soft Skinned' vehicles because of the superior penetrating abilities of the bullet tip. The rounds were made up in the usual 50rd cardboard box with the legend "Suitable for use in Sten Guns only", curious as we were issued Sterlings and with the best 2 stack, roller platformed magazine and jolly glad we were too. As an aside, we liberated bin loads of 9mm ammo, ball and some tracer as well, therefore our scrupulously maintained and counted ammo was locked up in the bins and the liberated stuff was disposed of by sending some of it in the maliwongo's direction when they dared sending the odd angry shot in our direction.
 
Probably L Jim Sullivan....

They should have ripped off his Ultimax and done a proper job of it..
The Ultimax is this thing.

10 out of 10 from Gun Jesus has to be a very strong recommendation.

James Edmiston (former owner of Sterling Armaments) in his book 'The Sterling Years' said he brought one of those into the UK from Singapore and invited the MoD to test it, specifying that it was not to be tested by the RSAF. The LSW & SA-80 were then under development and he doubted that it would get a fair test. I'd imagine he would have got a commission on any sold.

The MoD collected it and sent it to RSAF, who tested it, broke bits and sent it back with no comments.

I believe the mags are complex, with two column of ammunition feeding the action. I've never seen one.
 
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Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
As a civilian, I've wondered about this - when a modern soldier goes into combat, where does he/she carry the ammunition for their gun.

Modern infantry guns can fire many rounds in a short time. So they must need reloading frequently.

Where are the re-loads kept? Is it in boxes or packets, carried in a soldier's uniform pockets? And, as a follow-on question, how many boxes or packets of ammunition, does each soldier get issued with before going into action?

Apologies if these seem naive questions!
the report from That Rifle is so awesome, it caused a siesmic shock that stuns any surviving enemy, throwing them into confusion and disarray allowing you to go to the stores to fetch abother round.
 
We had an almost free fire range day, at least once a month, virtually unlimited ammo.

When it was first converted I fired many rounds through it and everybody else was having a go, even our admin staff.
On the slowest range days I would get through about 180 - 240 rounds just on my SLR.

It was my way of getting rid of the bad adrenalin.

I don't recall getting a single stoppage or mag problem.

I do remember the odd round failing to fire, there would be a strike mark on the base, but I don't remember what weapon I was using at the time.
Training for Bisley in 84/85 . Spent months on the ranges , firing thousands of rounds. Most of the time we never “broke” the rifle to clean it, just kept on packing in “graphite” grease , used to come in a little tube like a small toothpaste tube. Cleaned the gas parts with spit, WD 40 and rubbing them in the soil . Never had a stoppage .
 

Bacongrills

On ROPS
On ROPs
The Ultimax was light years ahead of the LSW, I had a go on one once on a foreign weapons range day, can't claim I'm an expert from 5 mins on it but it impressed me.
 

tiv

War Hero
The Ultimax is this thing.

10 out of 10 from Gun Jesus has to be a very strong recommendation.

James Edmiston (former owner of Sterling Armaments) in his book 'The Sterling Years' said he brought one of those into the UK from Singapore and invited the MoD to test it, specifying that it was not to be tested by the RSAF. The LSW & SA-80 were then under development and he doubted that it would get a fair test. I'd imagine he would have got a commission on any sold.

The MoD collected it and sent it to RSAF, who tested it, broke bits and sent it back with no comments.

I believe the mags are complex, with two column of ammunition feeding the action. I've never seen one.
All the testing I recall was done fairly and without favour. I do recall a memo from the SA80 people saying certain stoppages constitued know problem and were no longer to be recorded. We, of course, carried on recording and reporting every one.

Don't recall actually breaking any bits on the Ultimax. There was a stoppage during a heating cycle and it cooked off with an unlocked breach which required a bit of straightening but no parts were replaced and the gun carried on working fine afterwards.

Nice gun to shoot, very controlable.

Around the same time the AUG was tested which also faired well. One of the few guns that went through blown sand and worked.
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
there was a bloke in 1GH who bought his own 8mm SMG and used to play with it on full auto causing much confusion until words were had.
 
Not Black-and-Decker-Black-and-Decker?
For an SMG? Get real.

If we were playing enemy, we might resort to shouting "Clank, clank".

Our Wombat crew took the p!ss though. "Boom, boom, boom, boom, boom, RELOAD, boom, boom, boom, boom, boom, RELOAD, boom, boom, boom, boom, boom..."
 

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