THAT rifle

I got to fire an shit-ton of ammunition through the SLR, SMG and (mostly) the GPMG. I admit I have a crap memory, but I can't recall anything ever breaking on any of those in normal use; abuse and accidents are excluded.
I had the feed pawls on a GPMG fall to bits once. And the firing pin on a SMG wore down to the point where it didn't always fire the round - that took a bit of working out as the percussion cap was indented. Blame was being placed on the ammo until it was realised that only one weapon wasn't performing. But no problems ever with the SLR. These were weapons that would have been 18 years old when I started using them and 33 years old when we stopped using them. (Obviously, we had tea breaks in between).
 
In our shooting team we did have a few SLRs break on us (one was at Bisley in TASAM). By the extractor on the bolt there is a cut in which goes to quite a sharp point. This proved to be a fatigue point. One of our team did non-destructive testing on aircraft components for a living. He brought his kit in and we tested all of our weapons for cracks at that point. We found 3 dodgy ones so swapped them out - no more problems. This became part of our regular checks after that. The old style 5 bar flash eliminators were known to break as well - hence they were replaced with the 3 bar ones.
 

BopBopBop

War Hero
Thousands?
We had an almost free fire range day, at least once a month, virtually unlimited ammo.

When it was first converted I fired many rounds through it and everybody else was having a go, even our admin staff.
On the slowest range days I would get through about 180 - 240 rounds just on my SLR.

It was my way of getting rid of the bad adrenalin.

I don't recall getting a single stoppage or mag problem.

I do remember the odd round failing to fire, there would be a strike mark on the base, but I don't remember what weapon I was using at the time.
 

tiv

War Hero
I've fired three rounds from the L85A1. Each shot broke a firing pin. Others fared no better. The range part of the range weekend lasted an hour, most of which comprised putting up/returning the targets and reboxing the ammo.

Somewhere along the way, the plastic button of the hold-open device went walkies.

This was in 1991. Did somebody think that our rifles would be any better than those issued elsewhere in the preceding 5 years?
I have a vague memory of the L1 breaking firining pins way back. It was cured by going to a two piece firing pin.
 
Not sure what your point is ?

You seem to be saying that the SA80 and AR18 are just similar, or Enfield designed it and came to the same result ?

The SA80 upper is an AR18 upper nothing more nothing less, its not based on it, shares some aspects of it or by coincidence looks like it, it is it. The only difference is minor dimensions ( wrong ones )View attachment 474673
It's not though. You should read the rest of that article that you got the picture from. I suspect you may be pretending to be dim to get a bite out of me.

"Both Sterling and Enfield were free to copy aspects of Stoner/ArmaLite’s design, there being no patent protection on the relevant assemblies. Stoner himself was quite open about using Melvin Johnson’s multi-lugged rotating bolt (M1941) and Sergei Simonov’s short-stroke gas piston (SVT-40)."

The hack-saw jobs on the AR-18 and the Stoner 63 were just prototypes for testing. They should have similarly hacked up an AK-47, CAL and a Galil (too early?) they might have had some different ideas.

The people who conspicuously didn't wail about Enfield 'copying' were the ex-Armalite Engineers; they knew the rules of that game.
 
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JackSofty

War Hero
Eeh by eck, I remember back in't day.
The first time that I shot with the L85A1 was at the Bt. shoot not long after basic.
I made a rather good fist of it (coming second, huzzah, silvery medal jobby).
Very soon afterwards I was 'given' the job of section gunner and handed LSW no.7.
Of course I thought that it was because of my ability and skill. Very soon I realised that it was a case of 'Give it to the nig who is least likely to moan about it.'
Thankfully, operationally, LSW no.7 was exchanged for Jimpy no.4 but I have to say, having nursed her through many stoppages and other shortfalls, I missed her a bit. Call me a softy, whatever but...


Sent from my karzi while losing several pounds
 
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It's not though. You should read the rest of that article that you got the picture from. I suspect you may be pretending to be dim to get a bite out of me.

"Both Sterling and Enfield were free to copy aspects of Stoner/ArmaLite’s design, there being no patent protection on the relevant assemblies. Stoner himself was quite open about using Melvin Johnson’s multi-lugged rotating bolt (M1941) and Sergei Simonov’s short-stroke gas piston (SVT-40)."

The hack-saw jobs on the AR-18 and the Stoner 63 were just prototypes for testing. They should have similarly hacked up an AK-47, CAL and a Galil (too early?) they might have had some different ideas.

The people who conspicuously didn't wail about Enfield 'copying' were the ex-Armalite Engineers; they knew the rules of that game.
I've never claimed Enfield stole the design or infringed any patents, you're arguing against points I never made .

I've only claimed your original post that it was a "feeble myth that Enfield copied the AR18 bolt" is incorrect, if you read the ARES research you cited it confirms that they did.
 

JackSofty

War Hero
Apologies, I have pudgy fingers, a small keyboard (fnarr) and I am full of gin, rum and good vino.


Sent from my karzi while losing several pounds
 

mcphee1948

War Hero
As a civilian, I've wondered about this - when a modern soldier goes into combat, where does he/she carry the ammunition for their gun.

Modern infantry guns can fire many rounds in a short time. So they must need reloading frequently.

Where are the re-loads kept? Is it in boxes or packets, carried in a soldier's uniform pockets? And, as a follow-on question, how many boxes or packets of ammunition, does each soldier get issued with before going into action?

Apologies if these seem naive questions!
 
As a civilian, I've wondered about this - when a modern soldier goes into combat, where does he/she carry the ammunition for their gun.

Modern infantry guns can fire many rounds in a short time. So they must need reloading frequently.

Where are the re-loads kept? Is it in boxes or packets, carried in a soldier's uniform pockets? And, as a follow-on question, how many boxes or packets of ammunition, does each soldier get issued with before going into action?

Apologies if these seem naive questions!
This has to be a wind-up...


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This has to be a wind-up...


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Really?;)
The bit about the re-loads amuses me. I always used issued ammo. Are things now so bad that cases have to be collected for re-loading? o_O
 

mcphee1948

War Hero
Well, I must say the above replies to my genuine request for information about where soldiers keep their bullets, are a little disappointing.

You see, I was thinking about the film "Zulu". In that film, as you'll recall, the bullets were apparently kept in wooden crates. Which were sealed at the top, by what I assume was lead-foil. And a confirmatory scene in the film showed the foil being peeled off, to disclose a plentiful supply of bullets contained therein. To be distributed to the soldiers.

That's all well and good for a static, defensive battle like at Rorke's Drift. But what about a battle of movement, where the soldiers are advancing against the enemy.

Obviously, the soldiers can't keep stopping to wait for fresh supplies of bullets to be brought to them, from the rear. The soldiers will have to carry their own supplies, and my question was only where they kept them.

BTW, I'm using the term "bullets", because Drlilgaf saw fit to find fault with my employment of the term "re-loads", for reasons obscure to me. But out of civilian deference to superior military knowledge of correct nomenclature, I have amended my terminology. I hope this is satisfactory.
 
Well, I must say the above replies to my genuine request for information about where soldiers keep their bullets, are a little disappointing.

You see, I was thinking about the film "Zulu". In that film, as you'll recall, the bullets were apparently kept in wooden crates. Which were sealed at the top, by what I assume was lead-foil. And a confirmatory scene in the film showed the foil being peeled off, to disclose a plentiful supply of bullets contained therein. To be distributed to the soldiers.

That's all well and good for a static, defensive battle like at Rorke's Drift. But what about a battle of movement, where the soldiers are advancing against the enemy.

Obviously, the soldiers can't keep stopping to wait for fresh supplies of bullets to be brought to them, from the rear. The soldiers will have to carry their own supplies, and my question was only where they kept them.

BTW, I'm using the term "bullets", because Drlilgaf saw fit to find fault with my employment of the term "re-loads", for reasons obscure to me. But out of civilian deference to superior military knowledge of correct nomenclature, I have amended my terminology. I hope this is satisfactory.
Don't you find it tiring posting crap as both Gluesniffer and mcphee1948. Why didn't you stick to the avatar of 'Scarborough'.
 
As a civilian, I've wondered about this - when a modern soldier goes into combat, where does he/she carry the ammunition for their gun.

Modern infantry guns can fire many rounds in a short time. So they must need reloading frequently.

Where are the re-loads kept? Is it in boxes or packets, carried in a soldier's uniform pockets? And, as a follow-on question, how many boxes or packets of ammunition, does each soldier get issued with before going into action?

Apologies if these seem naive questions!
I keep them in my prison wallet. You can get at least 500 rounds of link up there.

I just feed them directly into the gun from there too in one long belt. Feels divine.
 
BTW, I'm using the term "bullets", because Drlilgaf saw fit to find fault with my employment of the term "re-loads", for reasons obscure to me. But out of civilian deference to superior military knowledge of correct nomenclature, I have amended my terminology. I hope this is satisfactory.
Apart from the fact that I reckon you're having a giraffe, the term re-loads is usually reserved for ammunition that has been made from used cases that have been cleaned, reprimed, filled with the appropriate powder and then the bullet is seated on top. Not something that the military does, but civvy shooters re-load ammo by the shed load.
 

JackSofty

War Hero
You see, I was thinking about the film "Zulu".
If you had paid attention to the movie, you would see that each soldier has a personal supply of rounds in the ammunition pouches of his 1871 pattern belt equipment. Even in a confined redoubt, it would not be feasible for the QMS and his staff to be feeding individual rounds to each man (you must have noticed that the Martini-Henry is a single shot weapon too).
You are making the common error that the cyclical rate of fire of a weapon is how many rounds can be put through it in a given time (an error that the twunk P. Morgan repeats often).
It would be stupid of any Rifleman or other soldier to just keep it squeezed until empty. He would very soon cease to exist, run up the curtain and join the choir invisible instead of pinin' for the fjiords and be unable to protect his squad, gun group, fire team or wotever.
Rate of fire is largely immaterial except in the case of support weapons (my role in my gun group, squad, patrol, fire team for much of the time) in which case the rest of the squad carries extra ammunition for that weapon's operator.
Just because an assault rifle may have a rate of fire of eg. 300 rds. per minute, there is NO WAY that anybody can put 300 rds. through it in 60 seconds.

Sent from my karzi while losing several pounds
 
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