THAT rifle

mso

LE
THAT rifle

1954: The British Army got new rifles, which they clearly couldn't wait to show everybody.
 

MrBane

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Reviews Editor
I'll be honest. That got me a little bit hard.
 

anglo

LE
THAT rifle

1954: The British Army got new rifles, which they clearly couldn't wait to show everybody.
I took the queens shilling in 1960 and first fired "that rifle" in 1967, I think
they thought they were to technical for the crabs, Mind I wasn't in the elite
mob
[Didn't the elite RAF regiment get them before the army so the best get to
test them first, so I heard]
 
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So simple and easy to strip, but forgot to mention cleaning the gas plug will take about a week so it's far easier to have a spare.
 

DaManBugs

LE
Book Reviewer
The rifle in the filum isn't what we were issued, though, is it? It's got a typical FN FAL sticky-out cocking handle, instead of the fold-down type used by the British Army. I also noticed that the sight-pipe thingy is mounted on the top cover and not on the metal bit where the wooden butt is attached. Were those changes made before the rifle was on general issue or were the first ones given out like that? I only got my hands on one at the beginning of 1966, but all the ones I handled after that were the same (that was long before they started replacing the wooden furniture with plastic).

MsG
 

4(T)

LE
The rifle in the filum isn't what we were issued, though, is it? It's got a typical FN FAL sticky-out cocking handle, instead of the fold-down type used by the British Army. I also noticed that the sight-pipe thingy is mounted on the top cover and not on the metal bit where the wooden butt is attached. Were those changes made before the rifle was on general issue or were the first ones given out like that? I only got my hands on one at the beginning of 1966, but all the ones I handled after that were the same (that was long before they started replacing the wooden furniture with plastic).

MsG

Its the British trials-pattern version of the FAL.

Enfield took the FAL drawings, converted them to imperial units, and then made some initial design modifications. Enfield or FN then made several thousand of this test model. Apart from appearing in Pathe newsreels, the trials pattern rifles were used on active service in Cyprus and Malaya. This rifle has a fixed cocking handle, no flash suppressor and a charger loading bridge on the top cover. It also had full-auto capability..

Australia, Britain and Canada (the "ABC" group) got together to jointly develop the rifle. After a few more modifications (such as the folding cocking handle, different sights, sand cuts, flash suppressor, semi-auto only selector, improved magazine locking lip, etc), the end result was the general issue L1A1.

Until a few years ago, many of the Trials FALs still existed as DP (deactivated) rifles that were used for, among other things, SF selection.
 

1&12

LE
It is so nice to hear some one speak clearly
Was the Sarnt Major RASC ?
I think he's SASC cap badge / 'SASC' titles by the looks, with the yellow dog in a basket on red and blue square WO Controlled Units patch.
The officer is Northants Regt with the white on red or yellow on blue Vikings head patches I think, I can't remember exactly what they are without a look at the books.
The guys plinking may be Wiltshire Regt?
The yellow viking head on blue shield was the East Anglian Brigade Training Group, worn about 1948- 1958.
The East Anglia District badge was white on red.
Depending on certain circumstances, they could both be worn at the same time, the blue on left, the red on right arm, but I think this officer is wearing the WO Controlled Unit patch on his right arm, yellow on blue Viking on his left.
 
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still staggin

War Hero
I think he's SASC cap badge / 'SASC' titles by the looks, with the yellow dog in a basket on red and blue square WO Controlled Units patch.
The officer is Northants Regt with the white on red or yellow on blue Vikings head patches I think, I can't remember exactly what they are without a look at the books.
The guys plinking may be Wiltshire Regt?
The yellow viking head on blue shield was the East Anglian Brigade Training Group, worn about 1948- 1958.
The East Anglia District badge was white on red.
Depending on certain circumstances, they could both be worn at the same time, the blue on left, the red on right arm, but I think this officer is wearing the WO Controlled Unit patch on his right arm, yellow on blue Viking on his left.
I take it you have quite a bit of spare time ....
Probably said this before but here goes, I did like the s l r because I always felt if you hit someone with a round fired from it they would fall over or stop what they were doing.
 

1&12

LE
I take it you have quite a bit of spare time ....
Probably said this before but here goes, I did like the s l r because I always felt if you hit someone with a round fired from it they would fall over or stop what they were doing.
I collect the insignia. Somebody asked a question, they got an answer.
I liked the because it allegedly blew soup plate holes in people.
PIRA complained that it was unsuitable for urban warfare as it would knock holes in brickwork. Seems a great idea to me.
 
I take it you have quite a bit of spare time ....
Probably said this before but here goes, I did like the s l r because I always felt if you hit someone with a round fired from it they would fall over or stop what they were doing.
The important bit made bold. The L85/L86 meant that far more firers became far more capable at "hitting". Because misses don't count.
 
Its the British trials-pattern version of the FAL.

Enfield took the FAL drawings, converted them to imperial units, and then made some initial design modifications. Enfield or FN then made several thousand of this test model. Apart from appearing in Pathe newsreels, the trials pattern rifles were used on active service in Cyprus and Malaya. This rifle has a fixed cocking handle, no flash suppressor and a charger loading bridge on the top cover. It also had full-auto capability..

Australia, Britain and Canada (the "ABC" group) got together to jointly develop the rifle. After a few more modifications (such as the folding cocking handle, different sights, sand cuts, flash suppressor, semi-auto only selector, improved magazine locking lip, etc), the end result was the general issue L1A1.

Until a few years ago, many of the Trials FALs still existed as DP (deactivated) rifles that were used for, among other things, SF selection.
Also, the designer of the FAL, Dieudonné Saive, was working at the RSAF Enfield during WW2, developing his automatic rifle designs. His design work produced the FN-49 rifle, which I believe (never seen one) is similar internally to the FAL, but the gas system isn't easily adjustable. This was further developed into the FAL.

It would be interesting (to me, anyway) to see how much of the Enfield-Saive SLEM-1 was later morphed into the FN-49 &/or the FAL.
 
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There’s enough crap threads on this shitcünt tool, populate them with your dullery rather than bothering the professional soldiers with the endless caq.
 
I think he's SASC cap badge / 'SASC' titles by the looks, with the yellow dog in a basket on red and blue square WO Controlled Units patch.
The officer is Northants Regt with the white on red or yellow on blue Vikings head patches I think, I can't remember exactly what they are without a look at the books.
The guys plinking may be Wiltshire Regt?
The yellow viking head on blue shield was the East Anglian Brigade Training Group, worn about 1948- 1958.
The East Anglia District badge was white on red.
Depending on certain circumstances, they could both be worn at the same time, the blue on left, the red on right arm, but I think this officer is wearing the WO Controlled Unit patch on his right arm, yellow on blue Viking on his left.
The chaps plinking are Wiltshire Reg. The Wiltshire's were demo battalion at Warminster 54/55. See my post below.

Search for an *Ally* star
 

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