Thanks and Respect

#1
Without suggesting I am becoming too "kind and gentle" I felt compelled to post my heartfelt appreciation to my UK cousins for their standing in the breach until we finally woke up in the early and hard going of WWII.

My wife and I just finished watching a biographical series on Winston Churchill and while(st) I know he provokes some debate, especially in our post-modern (and too often revisionist) perspectives of those momentous days, I am always thoroughly impressed by the (for me not you, divine Providence) that put him in the frame at the right time and place in your history.

Watching the series reminded me vividly of my days as a lad when my late father (and WWII veteran of the PTO but whose brother was a decorated airborne infantry officer and veteran of Bastogne) would have the family gather round the "entertainment center" (a massive piece of furniture containing a Stromberg Carlson phonograph and radio) to listen to his collection of Winston's speeches.

My father was quite a fan and taught us to respect such leadership, which I suppose planted the seeds for my later career. Of course in those days, he still enjoyed the afterglow of appreciation for his role in the war and there was no sniping at him for his all too human peccadilloes and eccentricities.

In any event, since I am feeling especially nostalgic, I thought I must convey the appreciation of at least this Septic for the "bulldog" spirit of Churchill and his countrymen and women in those very discouraging days. Too many of us seem to be so blissfully unaware of those times and the profound lessons about the dangers and narcotic effect of appeasement.

Those who have family or friends still living from that time, let them know some of us will not forget.

I am raising my Tardis inspired force shields again so you can slag away now....
 
#3
m
Without suggesting I am becoming too "kind and gentle" I felt compelled to post my heartfelt appreciation to my UK cousins for their standing in the breach until we finally woke up in the early and hard going of WWII.

My wife and I just finished watching a biographical series on Winston Churchill and while(st) I know he provokes some debate, especially in our post-modern (and too often revisionist) perspectives of those momentous days, I am always thoroughly impressed by the (for me not you, divine Providence) that put him in the frame at the right time and place in your history.

Watching the series reminded me vividly of my days as a lad when my late father (and WWII veteran of the PTO but whose brother was a decorated airborne infantry officer and veteran of Bastogne) would have the family gather round the "entertainment center" (a massive piece of furniture containing a Stromberg Carlson phonograph and radio) to listen to his collection of Winston's speeches.

My father was quite a fan and taught us to respect such leadership, which I suppose planted the seeds for my later career. Of course in those days, he still enjoyed the afterglow of appreciation for his role in the war and there was no sniping at him for his all too human peccadilloes and eccentricities.

In any event, since I am feeling especially nostalgic, I thought I must convey the appreciation of at least this Septic for the "bulldog" spirit of Churchill and his countrymen and women in those very discouraging days. Too many of us seem to be so blissfully unaware of those times and the profound lessons about the dangers and narcotic effect of appeasement.

Those who have family or friends still living from that time, let them know some of us will not forget.

I am raising my Tardis inspired force shields again so you can slag away now....
My dog called you a puff
.
 
#4
Look, Winston was an officer, there was no way he was going to let a jumped up full screw talk to him like that !

That's how wars start you know.
 
#5
I somehow feel strangely better now that the usual ARRSeing has resumed. PLAY ON...... ;-)
 
#9
Without suggesting I am becoming too "kind and gentle" I felt compelled to post my heartfelt appreciation to my UK cousins for their standing in the breach until we finally woke up in the early and hard going of WWII.

My wife and I just finished watching a biographical series on Winston Churchill and while(st) I know he provokes some debate, especially in our post-modern (and too often revisionist) perspectives of those momentous days, I am always thoroughly impressed by the (for me not you, divine Providence) that put him in the frame at the right time and place in your history.

Watching the series reminded me vividly of my days as a lad when my late father (and WWII veteran of the PTO but whose brother was a decorated airborne infantry officer and veteran of Bastogne) would have the family gather round the "entertainment center" (a massive piece of furniture containing a Stromberg Carlson phonograph and radio) to listen to his collection of Winston's speeches.

My father was quite a fan and taught us to respect such leadership, which I suppose planted the seeds for my later career. Of course in those days, he still enjoyed the afterglow of appreciation for his role in the war and there was no sniping at him for his all too human peccadilloes and eccentricities.

In any event, since I am feeling especially nostalgic, I thought I must convey the appreciation of at least this Septic for the "bulldog" spirit of Churchill and his countrymen and women in those very discouraging days. Too many of us seem to be so blissfully unaware of those times and the profound lessons about the dangers and narcotic effect of appeasement.

Those who have family or friends still living from that time, let them know some of us will not forget.

I am raising my Tardis inspired force shields again so you can slag away now....
Sigh hand on hips "You soft Bastard"
 

Biped

LE
Book Reviewer
#11
Well said that (mmm, seems a bit effeminate, but it goes with the territory - you can take the boy out of the sea, but you can't take the seamen out of the boy) man!
 
#13
JJH
There is a song specially for you you big nancy :ufo: :smooch:

Hey Mr. Jim I can see the shape youre in
Finger on your eyebrow
And left hand on your hip
Thinking that youre such a lady killer
Think your so slick!


With thanks to Spanish Stroll
 
#15
I'll give you a big hug of 'across the pond' friendship in a 'bloke' sort of way. Not man love of course. You big soft merkin Jesse, now pull yourself together and pass the salted peanuts. The weekend beckons and I feel a thirst for beer developing. Beer I said, not that Budweiser nonsense...
 
#16
I've sussed it.

JJH is down for a Holiday to our fair and pleasant shores and he's after a bed/tourist guide/gaping arse/servant/pick-up from the airport* and he's smooching up to everyone first before he starts asking around for favours.

(*-Delete as applicable)

As I said before, you'll get no Favours here, Colonel Sir :wink:
 

the_boy_syrup

LE
Book Reviewer
#17
Dam it's dusty in here

Rip Sir Winston Stand down sir your jobs done
 
#18
#19
well said JJH.....all kidding aside....
 
#20
JJH,

Now, if only Washington had said some kind things about King George 111, and vice versa (Churchill was pretty complimentary about America), just think of the aggro and misunderstandings we would have avoided!

Anyway thanks for the comment.
 
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