Tesla tanks and Quorn sausage.

On the down side you might have some trouble with the minimum speed. IIRC one AFV that they tried it with as an experiment had a minimum speed of 7mph, which was judged too fast to accompany infantry.

Must have been a flawed design.

Most modern electric vehicles use AC traction motors whose output torque can be controlled by voltage and frequency to a very granular level. For example, railway locomotives use controlled wheel-slip to apply massive amounts torque to crawl along at < 2 mph when offloading coal.
 
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bob231

War Hero
Any idea why that was? To the uninformed (holds hand up) it would seem to run against how motors work.
There is a phenomenon called static friction, which means you have to apply a certain amount of torque to get the motor to move at all.

However, more likely and as discussed it was not having anywhere to dump the power output from the generator. Type 45 has a similar problem.
 

2000AD

Old-Salt
I have wondered before how possible it might be to sandwich together battery cells with other materials as part of the tanks armour
Given the current battery technology of lithium ion to burn ferociously due to lithiums volatility when exposed to air, I don't think it's likely to be much use in composite armour. It's all but impossible to extinguish a fire in an electric vehicle. The fire brigade currently have a policy of allowing them to burn out naturally.

The very high voltages involved also make approaching and dealing with damaged vehicles very interesting.

Damaged batteries can remain a danger for weeks afterwards. A recent incident of a fire at a research facility occured 2 weeks after a vehicle had been crash damaged, parked up and spontaeously combusted due to damaged cells in the battery pack.

There are huge developmental and safety issues to overcome before such vehicles will become properly viable on the battlefield.
 
The next big thing appears to be "Massless Batteries"

This technology would have the power storage as the structure of the vehicle.
 
Hydrogen fuel cell will be the way to go, MBT are large enough in their hull to only require refuelling with water. The hydrogen generator, its tank and power train would easily fit. And the tanks for the water, well wouldn’t need to be in special tanks. Could be stored in the hull bottom and even used as part of the armour.
 

Chef

LE
As long as it has a BV.
 
Hydrogen fuel cell will be the way to go, MBT are large enough in their hull to only require refuelling with water. The hydrogen generator, its tank and power train would easily fit. And the tanks for the water, well wouldn’t need to be in special tanks. Could be stored in the hull bottom and even used as part of the armour.

Fuel cells run off pressurised hydrogen - not water.
 

Tyk

LE
Yup, it also means you can play silly buggers with the location of the engine, and it'd make (theoretically) four track tanks easier to control and simple enough to operate.
On the down side you might have some trouble with the minimum speed. IIRC one AFV that they tried it with as an experiment had a minimum speed of 7mph, which was judged too fast to accompany infantry.

Indeed, plus if they argue for "hybrid" vehicles (in the same vein as diesel electric trains) a well designed and efficient genset that runs off whatever fuel you chose can be reliable and pretty compact, both of which are vital to AFV's.
Speed shouldn't be a hard issue to solve, basically electronics control problem and that's easy enough engineering.
There's a lot of benefits to electric drive, the problem we have is recharging if it's battery powered plus batteries weigh a LOT.
 
I know that, that’s why I said Hydrogen Generator along with tank, which I should have said pressurised.

you don't think that trying to transport large volumes of pressurised cryogenic hydrogen both to and around the battlefield is likely to offer logistic challenges somewhat in excess of that offered by diesel?
 

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