Tesla tanks and Quorn sausage.

sunny james

War Hero
Forget about the Russian menace, Climate Change is the next big threat. Electric tanks and a veggie diet will be part of the armies arsenal in the future.
 
Forget about the Russian menace, Climate Change is the next big threat. Electric tanks and a veggie diet will be part of the armies arsenal in the future.
Well. It will bring a whole new meaning to the cavalry mounting their chargers...
 
Forget about the Russian menace, Climate Change is the next big threat. Electric tanks and a veggie diet will be part of the armies arsenal in the future.

Well that's good news.

In tank design there is no reason why we can't use hybrid drives, indeed it would seem to offer some improvements. Equally, it means that the Army are now committed to designing our own new MBT.

However, I have many many pages of documents from the 60's through to the 80's of why a 20-ton MBT is a bad idea and won't work. Where such small UGV's could be useful is as an adjunct to proper MBT's.
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
Well that's good news.

In tank design there is no reason why we can't use hybrid drives, indeed it would seem to offer some improvements. Equally, it means that the Army are now committed to designing our own new MBT.

However, I have many many pages of documents from the 60's through to the 80's of why a 20-ton MBT is a bad idea and won't work. Where such small UGV's could be useful is as an adjunct to proper MBT's.


Ferdinand Porsche was ahead of the curve


admittedly it was petrol powered generators with electric drive and wasn't very reliable.
 
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Isn't electric drive, at least on paper, a good idea - no requirement for a gearbox and immediate peak torque?

Yup, it also means you can play silly buggers with the location of the engine, and it'd make (theoretically) four track tanks easier to control and simple enough to operate.
On the down side you might have some trouble with the minimum speed. IIRC one AFV that they tried it with as an experiment had a minimum speed of 7mph, which was judged too fast to accompany infantry.
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
Isn't electric drive, at least on paper, a good idea - no requirement for a gearbox and immediate peak torque?

also can be easier to route a cable to a motor at the wheel/drive sprocket than a shaft from a gearbox, can have drive on a traditional vehicle at each wheel, control the power to each wheel,
 
IIRC one AFV that they tried it with as an experiment had a minimum speed of 7mph, which was judged too fast to accompany infantry.
Any idea why that was? To the uninformed (holds hand up) it would seem to run against how motors work.
 

PhotEx

On ROPS
On ROPs
Veggie food makes you fart, a lot.
will they duct the air from the fighting compartment to fuel the engines?
It would be very green, a closed cycle tank.
 
Any idea why that was? To the uninformed (holds hand up) it would seem to run against how motors work.

It was just a test bed AFV.

I think it was a problem based on the level of input control the operators had (IE: Try getting your car to do 1mph, using just clutch and accelerator). Now you could stick a limiter in, but in combat that's another thing to control (or switch on at the wrong time), and if you need a burst of speed, you need it now, not after the driver's had to think about it and disengage a limiter.

Honestly, this was mentioned in idle conversation with an engineer, so it could all be bollocks, or misremembered.
 
In tank design there is no reason why we can't use hybrid drives, indeed it would seem to offer some improvements. Equally, it means that the Army are now committed to designing our own new MBT.

Refuelling a tank with diesel is quick and easy compared to recharging one. Google tells me that a Tesla weighs in at 1.6 tons, and takes 30-60 minutes to recharge from a 75-150 kilowatt source. That will give you a range of around 300 miles. A Challenger 2 weighs in at 62.5 tons and interestingly also has a range of around 300 miles. A tank squadron is presently 18 tanks. How do you move enough electrical power forwards to to recharge them all in a timely manner? A truck with a massive diesel generator? A truck with massive batteries of its own? And if the latter, how and where do you charge that truck? And can you keep your formation static for as long as it takes? There are no good answers to these questions at this time.
 
Refuelling a tank with diesel is quick and easy compared to recharging one. Google tells me that a Tesla weighs in at 1.6 tons, and takes 30-60 minutes to recharge from a 75-150 kilowatt source. That will give you a range of around 300 miles. A Challenger 2 weighs in at 62.5 tons and interestingly also has a range of around 300 miles. A tank squadron is presently 18 tanks. How do you move enough electrical power forwards to to recharge them all in a timely manner? A truck with a massive diesel generator? A truck with massive batteries of its own? And if the latter, how and where do you charge that truck? And can you keep your formation static for as long as it takes? There are no good answers to these questions at this time.
Electric drive doesn't mean battery powered.
 
Refuelling a tank with diesel is quick and easy compared to recharging one. Google tells me that a Tesla weighs in at 1.6 tons, and takes 30-60 minutes to recharge from a 75-150 kilowatt source. That will give you a range of around 300 miles. A Challenger 2 weighs in at 62.5 tons and interestingly also has a range of around 300 miles. A tank squadron is presently 18 tanks. How do you move enough electrical power forwards to to recharge them all in a timely manner? A truck with a massive diesel generator? A truck with massive batteries of its own? And if the latter, how and where do you charge that truck? And can you keep your formation static for as long as it takes? There are no good answers to these questions at this time.

Note I said hybrid.
 
Refuelling a tank with diesel is quick and easy compared to recharging one. Google tells me that a Tesla weighs in at 1.6 tons, and takes 30-60 minutes to recharge from a 75-150 kilowatt source. That will give you a range of around 300 miles. A Challenger 2 weighs in at 62.5 tons and interestingly also has a range of around 300 miles. A tank squadron is presently 18 tanks. How do you move enough electrical power forwards to to recharge them all in a timely manner? A truck with a massive diesel generator? A truck with massive batteries of its own? And if the latter, how and where do you charge that truck? And can you keep your formation static for as long as it takes? There are no good answers to these questions at this time.

Think Prius rather than Tesla. Or think how a diesel-electric submarine works

and think also about how a submarines ability to run on battery power only, for a limited duration, is used tactically.

I have wondered before how possible it might be to sandwich together battery cells with other materials as part of the tanks armour
 
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Think Prius rather than Tesla. Or think how a diesel-electric submarine works

and think also about how a submarines ability to run on battery power only, for a limited duration, is used tactically.

I have wondered before how possible it might be to sandwich together battery cells with other materials as part of the tanks armour

Indeed. A diesel-electric sub uses its batteries as ballast too. The best battery chemistry at the moment is lithium which is unsuitable for armour unfortunately, it easily catches fire.

A formation of tanks moving in complete silence would be pretty terrifying!
 
Indeed. A diesel-electric sub uses its batteries as ballast too. The best battery chemistry at the moment is lithium which is unsuitable for armour unfortunately, it easily catches fire.

A formation of tanks moving in complete silence would be pretty terrifying!

Yup, a tank might only need to be able to run on battery power at full pelt for a few minutes, but from the point of view of both noise and thermal signature, it could be a huge game changer.
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
Indeed. A diesel-electric sub uses its batteries as ballast too. The best battery chemistry at the moment is lithium which is unsuitable for armour unfortunately, it easily catches fire.

A formation of tanks moving in complete silence would be pretty terrifying!

silent apart from the noise of the tracks... assuming we don't have some new silent version yet
 

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