Tesco next down the pan?

ExREME.TECH

War Hero
I went to our local butcher. Brilliant. Excellent meat, some lovely dry cured bacon and the news that he's having to give more hours to the temporary butcher he's had to recruit because of the increase in trade over the last two months.
I use my local butcher and farm shop. Slightly more in cost than the supermarket but most better quality
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
I use my local butcher and farm shop. Slightly more in cost than the supermarket but most better quality
Local butcher and local veg box for me. 40 years of being a Sainsbury's customer down the pan when no delivery slots available for us. Used the delivery service for years too!
 
Local butcher and local veg box for me. 40 years of being a Sainsbury's customer down the pan when no delivery slots available for us. Used the delivery service for years too!
Being on the government vulnerable coffin dodger list the wife and I are well looked after by Sainsbury's for home deliveries..
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
Being on the government vulnerable coffin dodger list the wife and I are well looked after by Sainsbury's for home deliveries..
It took me two weeks to get us onto the Sainsbury's vulnerable list (himself awaits neurosurgery, takes steroids, blah blah) and since then I have managed to get one delivery. Just one.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
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I went to our local butcher. Brilliant. Excellent meat, some lovely dry cured bacon and the news that he's having to give more hours to the temporary butcher he's had to recruit because of the increase in trade over the last two months.
I have a very good pal, he has run a butcher shop for years but recently came to the conclusion he simply couldn't continue. Just him and a part-timer trying to run a shop 8.30-5.30 six days a week, it was killing him and he simply wasn't making any money. He was on the point of calling it a day earlier this year then COVID-19 struck. The bloke is now working flat out, he has never been busier in his life. He is making sales on a Tuesday that he would never have dreamed of lifting in an entire week previously.

The reasons he gives are many, people reluctant to drive to supermarkets and be stopped by the police, then stand queuing for the one-in-one-out policy, customers preferring to walk to the local shop, it gives them an excuse to be out of the house each day and a bag of meat is your get out of jail free card if the peelers stop you.

But far and away the big factor was the closure of all the bars and restaurants. Most people, he said, had given up cooking at home, why would they when they could get fantastically cooked dishes served to them by low-paid immigrants and then walk away and leave them to wash up? Even if they didn't eat out, you could order any amount of take away food. That's largely at an end.

Worse yet, the kids are all off school and the little blighters need to be fed three times a day. Women are suddenly buying cuts of meat their mothers used to buy 30 years ago, no more chicken terriyaki or pork loin in Thai sauce, they're buying lamb shoulder or brisket, shin beef for soup and buying a bag of spuds for peeling too, no more expensive bags of frozen chips.

Times are hard now, there's no denying it, even those supermarkets that do survive will look different, vast swathes of specialist products will be dumped, mostly the basic lines will be stocked. As our online purchases take us into the 21st century we will be returning to the seventies in bricks and mortar retail.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
All of that supported by my chap in Sturminster Newton, apart from his cynicism that people will revert to old habits once all this is over. I hope he's wrong, as I love shopping locally and getting to know suppliers. We always used the brilliant Kiwi Butcher in Dorchester before we moved. A superb butcher selling great meat and game, a genuine Kiwi, part-time Sergeant in the Rifles with a couple of hot tours under his belt, conversation often revolved around THAT rifle or other matters that confused the other people in the shop!
 

TamH70

MIA
Oh, oh, I've got a contribution.

Hertz has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, putting thousands of jobs at risk:


"Hertz joins other large American companies in filing for COVID-19 related bankruptcy actions, including J.C. Penney and Neiman Marcus. No Hertz locations in the U.S. are expected to close, including subsidiaries such as Dollar, Thrifty and Hertz Car Sales. "


"Despite being allowed to stay open as an "essential business", the firm was forced to close the majority of its branches across the UK and Ireland when COVID-19 hit.

The company lost all its revenue soon after the UK went into lockdown and plunged £15.3bn into debt by the end of March, court documents reveal."
 
It took me two weeks to get us onto the Sainsbury's vulnerable list (himself awaits neurosurgery, takes steroids, blah blah) and since then I have managed to get one delivery. Just one.
Got an email from Sainsbury's a week or so after getting the letter from the NHS, telling us we were on their priority delivery list, since then we have booked a delivery every week - with plenty of day/time options.
The first couple of weeks a number of items were unavailable but since then no problems.
When this is all over we will stick with Sainsbury's - they are looking after us, we will return the favour :)
 
You don't know how right you are, i have just been told by No 2 daughter, that Barclays is closing, that leaves Lloyds, Nat west, and nationwide in the village
Three banks? Even our local town - Rye, East Sussex - just has a Nationwide BS. All the others Lloyds,Nat West, Barclays, HSBC, Halifax all long gone. That said, I see why. The Manager of HSBC in Tunbridge Wells was telling me that a village near here had 16 customers in the quarter prior to it being closed down. That's not viable is it?
 
Debenhams again... death by a thousand cuts.

28th May - hundreds' of its head-office staff axed

and from the Beeb today we have...


The sooner this ‘in administration‘ fast track to failure finally vanishes off the face of the earth the better. An appalling situation for all of it’s workers to be in, just waiting for the call to tell them they will be losing their jobs.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
Debenhams again... death by a thousand cuts.

28th May - hundreds' of its head-office staff axed

and from the Beeb today we have...


The sooner this ‘in administration‘ fast track to failure finally vanishes off the face of the earth the better. An appalling situation for all of it’s workers to be in, just waiting for the call to tell them they will be losing their jobs.
Smells a bit fishy to me. Has the law around 90 days' notice changed?
 
Smells a bit fishy to me. Has the law around 90 days' notice changed?
The BBC article is the usual mish mash of contradictory and ill informed statements...
  • Staff say they will not receive redundancy pay from the company and will not have paid notice periods.
  • In a separate email, staff were told that claims for redundancy payments would have to be made through the UK government.
  • "I've looked into it and because of my age I'll only be getting one and a half weeks' worth of redundancy pay - half a week for each year I've worked there.
Reading the BBC article, it is perhaps a reasonable assumption that Debenham’s restaurant staff will generally be fairly transient and of short service - not too many long service employees affected. That may inform the view that (within the bounds of a redundancy process) the employees are being treated unfairly. I imagine the administrators will know and will be acting exactly to the letter of the law.


Anyway, on the 90 day notice thing...

There is no statutory requirement to give an employee 90 days notice of termination.

The statutory redundancy notice periods are:
  • at least one week’s notice if employed between one month and 2 years
  • one week’s notice for each year if employed between 2 and 12 years
  • 12 weeks’ notice if employed for 12 years or more
You may be thinking of consultation periods prior to termination which again are not required to be of 90 days duration.

and on consultation periods

There’s no time limit for how long the period of consultation should be, but the minimum is:​
  • 20 to 99 redundancies - the consultation must start at least 30 days before any dismissals take effect
  • 100 or more redundancies - the consultation must start at least 45 days before any dismissals take effect.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
Whenever I have worked for a company who started 'managing the workforce' that lovely euphemism for redundancy, I must have been lucky as there was always a 90 day consultation/notice period.

That includes engineering manufacture, banking, and software houses. I assumed it was the law. Obviously just born lucky, as in addition I only got redundancy when I wanted it and could turn it to my advantage.
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
The BBC article is the usual mish mash of contradictory and ill informed statements...

  • In a separate email, staff were told that claims for redundancy payments would have to be made through the UK government.
I may be being a bit thick here, but why should the Govt pay redundancy for employees that Debenhams have made redundant, they don't work for the Govt and if they can't afford to pay the redundancies, should they even consider re-opening stores?
 
I may be being a bit thick here, but why should the Govt pay redundancy for employees that Debenhams have made redundant, they don't work for the Govt and if they can't afford to pay the redundancies, should they even consider re-opening stores?
The only ‘thick’ aspect may be taking the BBC article as fact rather than a poorly researched, poorly written pile of shite.

Insolvency law say administrators have 14 days to make staff redundant in order to avoid liability for their employment and wages. After 14 days the staff are effectively deemed to have been TUPEd into the 'new business’, Dogshit Is Us (in administration) Ltd or whatever.

In the case of Debenhams, the latest fall into administration was in Mid April so on the face of it, the still trading company should/will pick up the redundancy costs. (My current understanding)

The BBC does not let fact get in the way of a story. Remember the BBC’s big story of the director of a large unnamed NHS trust who phoned the BBC for the phone numbers of Burberry and Barbour. That was fact free too insofar as it never actually happened?
 
I thought I'd have some lunch today.
And then I thought I'd maybe pass.
This is not for the first time.
Tesco own label so called pink salmon.
Its deaf aid beige and stinks like whores knickers on dockland pay day.
Apparently.
 
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